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MFH 1/12 '64 Ferrari 250 GTO


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5 hours ago, Octavian said:

Danibear,

 

Thank you so much for taking the time to register just to share this! That is very kind of you, and I truly appreciate it. I had found it odd that it ended up that rough; I am very relieved to hear about the proper way of doing it; I have quite a lot of it, so I was disappointed to think that I wouldn't get to use it. So there is no need to thin with any other sort of thinner, is that right? Just extra thinning with the hardener?

 

Thanks again,

Andrew

Correct, just add somewhat more hardener liquid functioning as thinner. Always work for me. 

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Hello Andrew,

 

Just want to share with you how I the treat the white metal parts and rivets of MFH.

 

After treating the white metal parts with model knife and wire brush, I prime them with Mr Metal Primer with brush.  It dries quickly and provides a smooth finish for subsequent air brushing.  The paints I use is Mr Color solvent based paints.  It provides a more durable finishes than that of acrylics but you have to bear with the unpleasant smell of the paints and thinner and should use them in a well-ventilated area.  Tweezers with smooth jaws in later handling help protect the paint from scratches.

 

For MFH’s rivets, I guess 3mm is the standard length of the stem of the rivets.  Actually, 1-1.5mm is enough to attach the rivets firmly into the model with holes of the same diameter.  I shorten the stem of each rivets to be inserted.  Sufficient lighting is required as you are pointing a small pin to a small hole.

 

Hope this help.

 

Looking forward to your next update.

 

Best regards,

Kenneth

 

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Sound advice and thoughts from Nick :)

 

These are the type of tips he mentions.....https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/252527346856?hash=item3acbcd84a8:g:tk0AAOSw9IpXzdRK

 

For working with the thin CA I use these.....https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/324189901970?epid=1344244881&hash=item4b7b395492:g:GUoAAOSwMNhe23L0

 

It would also help you to get some of this.....https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/193855988862?epid=1823154964&hash=item2d22b7a47e:g:h2QAAOSwOEZgBu1f

 

Nick is also correct about roughing the surfaces to be bonded...especially when working with photo etch.

Pinning pieces is vital when working with mixed media...resin/plastic/metals...although in 1/12 I tend to use 0.5 mm brass rod...dressmakers pins...or 0.6 mm nickel silver rod.

 

Another aspect to cover is a good quality pin vice...such as this.....

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/363172997776?_trkparms=aid%3D555023%26algo%3DHOMESPLICE.SIMRVI%26ao%3D1%26asc%3D232900%26meid%3D2fcb0f38e3ff47fb99f8f4114f6a5252%26pid%3D101112%26rk%3D5%26rkt%3D24%26sd%3D322264545862%26itm%3D363172997776%26pmt%3D1%26noa%3D0%26pg%3D2563228%26algv%3DSimplAMLv5hPointwiseWebNoToraCoCoViewsNoHighIdfOrRoundRobinBlenderWithPromotedViewItems%26brand%3DUnbranded&_trksid=p2563228.c101112.m1982&amdata=cksum%3A3631729977762fcb0f38e3ff47fb99f8f4114f6a5252|enc%3AAQAGAAACQJADiyuaPMlj3o20EnNBneSUGTAjbRytt1rzj%2FLDVbmUyKnSM98XeypQGU1WAAClLLhgtSR4wv2XPLRsrPcldLUFKXebDcqHdsf2Ml4%2FdwyO3qOt%2Fg79dqvE0nJK0RJHestqjXSASZM5v7ZTMI4uPy%2BSZgck8OMZk51eZeOIXKSnNjRBxFLA5VRkY8hD2g0ufGahN43g2eIUTpnqm3rOOrfj176TT%2FvDOtYtHGCIUOl9liPmCUPizFAMz3WBhYiZLJyHzstJbdnSVxnMJBAfqU6Cj6lBBsop1CNcJzg3Q4tBoviYqBXWhb4r658lPsi4HLntSmgCfPYw9u7SRF551u5wKIIpoYsYI6kqvoGO9h4RwHbF9gevco4KY3Z90BSwSr3jYH9xvJ9PxSEGEPOdCzT%2B6Rktv9AAgrZtcrN%2F0BMl08aHPYQ4LrbO8iDkccg6PG1MC7PhZ1Llq8IFicN8Q%2BFMWu8eUIfHGjwSQY3SpBKAkQ82SAOLl%2BXYCJiuhowYoujHNRyoNQ0S2ZPTjWffej7TEQqKsq8lDFd4K6LJGnDCOpzAbCOl0SrX1CZoJTXmoNC5TljNhmJju3zxQVrhLU3hbU%2F7F9kn%2Fk%2FtTRyYlPbu%2BcRBTxsMZET5cMtgbChrJPKCuoM4Bl6oSws%2F8YsL5pTzxFEyRYgfDZOR0%2Fp7GLBxKCRtkaDk8lkwuxH9MkiPDvIUKFZ7qhKEpBCppVZVO0WdJ7BM8x0nKSWMq3YmDg6XMQnvhIonuUqD0WyA%2FQZgqg%3D%3D|ampid%3APL_CLK|clp%3A2563228

 

And...of course...drill bits.....

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/144036950063?_trkparms=aid%3D1110006%26algo%3DHOMESPLICE.SIM%26ao%3D1%26asc%3D232900%26meid%3D35e650a975d8473c802cadd4caa5a2ed%26pid%3D101195%26rk%3D5%26rkt%3D12%26sd%3D194040227201%26itm%3D144036950063%26pmt%3D1%26noa%3D0%26pg%3D2047675%26algv%3DSimplAMLv9PairwiseUnbiasedWeb&_trksid=p2047675.c101195.m1851&amdata=cksum%3A14403695006335e650a975d8473c802cadd4caa5a2ed|enc%3AAQAGAAACEPJUVVGP5SkrYcDd6NzcsQWkCknbOp8WkCP77%2FN7G%2BK9vVsTBaMZMRTP4KOiUSQiLIszcgQfu8UIz3pKXR9niYVW0x0mSsxBo%2Bt0zQ1Q%2Brh1W7nZZ34ezIAyYn9P7oq3K%2FfJjxIZm9%2BX7EykvdVT7ASHkW%2FGryXpkoABtb%2Bubz9xv942VmVkPoSTEjV1z8llttKSlC1zN6Cqfcep15hvi6DCAyZQ5S7L5X0YKO53t7%2BgU4vodR36B7bXdceTDP%2FdpglanKOM6Uoh5K2ACmvFoNn7ks9xZ34OlucXLpIgyf1xn%2FXswU7xs%2FP7m8oXFionsKFz9JsdtZOMsjWrn1vjlw171UdpSnmBRBu%2BeeNJZImZ87mHF227Oyt6kD58G4VifiVoKdzaDPLxyG%2FF6RJGfqdXqBQuon3QmvTy20iH8lDNmWt2VHjsru1PSQZK%2FCdNgC5s8VunHU6AqARZikfdz0GvFBfipAOZsX60aWkCMRI6TMGEdQkk%2BKLhiM3HNOz6JxoKGqfIB%2BAwrvwlYjNKbbEwg%2B2yOWFnP3fbLneZe2s34uN%2Byh5aCcUYMneLe5%2F8y65NjvAMJEJOcHiJFaT%2BrZrv6ZtBCl40bHhcZmnKVIKh747zZf%2B9wyfLQpKK1R7PqtE%2BR05zibkdK%2BqX1RA2Sd3cjsTO0cRlAx2SCoBQ7LJ1rl0uJWmK%2Btcc0MfFx%2B5jww%3D%3D|ampid%3APL_CLK|clp%3A2047675

 

The deeper you get into the build...the more techniques you will develop...and skills you will acquire...along with the knowledge gained from asking for help and advice...which I applaud you for asking for...that show's a genuine desire to improve.

 

You are building this kit for enjoyment...and that shows through in the quality of your work...nice one mate :clap2:

 

Respect

 

Ron

 

 

 

 

 

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16 hours ago, Stickframe said:

Hi Andrew, 

 

There's another CA option - Gap Filling Medium CA.  Not at all runny, and less likely to have the big blobs you can get with gel.  Also, you can get special tips for your CA bottle, that are about an inch long, and end at a relatively fine point.  With some practice, you can get pretty good at letting out the "right" amount of glue pretty close to where you you want it.  I don't use the thin type CA either - just can't keep it under control!  Another feature of the gap filling medium CA is that it doesn't stick instantly, leaving you a few seconds to locate and set the object you are gluing in place - I usually use the point on a fine file or knife to tap the part down, and "set it".   You can also get an odorless type, which I do - it turns out, I use a lot of CA, and might be allergic to the smell!!  no odor, no more runny nose when I'm building models - It took me a long, long time to figure that out!  😁🤧  I'm glad I figured that out - 

 

As you experiment with more types of CA on various surfaces, you'll figure out other tricks.  When I'm gluing two etch pieces together, and sometimes one piece of etch onto resin or plastic, I'll sand/rough up the etch mating surfaces with coarse sand paper.  This seems to help, giving the CA something to "bite", reducing the possibility of the etch part "flicking" off.   For white metal parts that are structural, I'll drill out the connecting points and insert short, small diameter brass rod - using a #72 drill bit and .020" or .025" rod.  This task can seem tedious, but I found it to pay off on suspension parts, which are usually subject to lots of handling during a build, and increased chances of breaking the glue joint.    

 

Hope this is some help!

 

Looking forward to your next update,

 

Cheers

Nick 

 

Nick,

 

Many thanks for this. I will go pick up some of the medium CA; that sounds like a good thing to experiment with. The gel is a bit thicker than is optimal, so I will definitely give the medium stuff a try. I appreciate all of the tips, and I will incorporate them into my technique; thanks so much.

 

All best,

Andrew

14 hours ago, danibear said:

Correct, just add somewhat more hardener liquid functioning as thinner. Always work for me. 

 

Great, thank you!

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11 hours ago, LKF1130 said:

Hello Andrew,

 

Just want to share with you how I the treat the white metal parts and rivets of MFH.

 

After treating the white metal parts with model knife and wire brush, I prime them with Mr Metal Primer with brush.  It dries quickly and provides a smooth finish for subsequent air brushing.  The paints I use is Mr Color solvent based paints.  It provides a more durable finishes than that of acrylics but you have to bear with the unpleasant smell of the paints and thinner and should use them in a well-ventilated area.  Tweezers with smooth jaws in later handling help protect the paint from scratches.

 

For MFH’s rivets, I guess 3mm is the standard length of the stem of the rivets.  Actually, 1-1.5mm is enough to attach the rivets firmly into the model with holes of the same diameter.  I shorten the stem of each rivets to be inserted.  Sufficient lighting is required as you are pointing a small pin to a small hole.

 

Hope this help.

 

Looking forward to your next update.

 

Best regards,

Kenneth

 

 

Kenneth,

 

Thanks for this; I found myself shortening the rivet shafts as well, so I didn't have to drill as aggressively; as you say, about 1.5 mm was plenty to get a secure insertion. As far as paints go, I am using a variety; some Tamiya acrylic, some Vallejo metal color acrylic, and for the body, Zero Paints. I am always open to experimenting with different types, however, so I keep the Mr. Color option in mind. Many thanks.

 

Best,

Andrew

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10 hours ago, silver911 said:

Sound advice and thoughts from Nick :)

 

These are the type of tips he mentions.....https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/252527346856?hash=item3acbcd84a8:g:tk0AAOSw9IpXzdRK

 

For working with the thin CA I use these.....https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/324189901970?epid=1344244881&hash=item4b7b395492:g:GUoAAOSwMNhe23L0

 

It would also help you to get some of this.....https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/193855988862?epid=1823154964&hash=item2d22b7a47e:g:h2QAAOSwOEZgBu1f

 

Nick is also correct about roughing the surfaces to be bonded...especially when working with photo etch.

Pinning pieces is vital when working with mixed media...resin/plastic/metals...although in 1/12 I tend to use 0.5 mm brass rod...dressmakers pins...or 0.6 mm nickel silver rod.

 

Another aspect to cover is a good quality pin vice...such as this.....

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/363172997776?_trkparms=aid%3D555023%26algo%3DHOMESPLICE.SIMRVI%26ao%3D1%26asc%3D232900%26meid%3D2fcb0f38e3ff47fb99f8f4114f6a5252%26pid%3D101112%26rk%3D5%26rkt%3D24%26sd%3D322264545862%26itm%3D363172997776%26pmt%3D1%26noa%3D0%26pg%3D2563228%26algv%3DSimplAMLv5hPointwiseWebNoToraCoCoViewsNoHighIdfOrRoundRobinBlenderWithPromotedViewItems%26brand%3DUnbranded&_trksid=p2563228.c101112.m1982&amdata=cksum%3A3631729977762fcb0f38e3ff47fb99f8f4114f6a5252|enc%3AAQAGAAACQJADiyuaPMlj3o20EnNBneSUGTAjbRytt1rzj%2FLDVbmUyKnSM98XeypQGU1WAAClLLhgtSR4wv2XPLRsrPcldLUFKXebDcqHdsf2Ml4%2FdwyO3qOt%2Fg79dqvE0nJK0RJHestqjXSASZM5v7ZTMI4uPy%2BSZgck8OMZk51eZeOIXKSnNjRBxFLA5VRkY8hD2g0ufGahN43g2eIUTpnqm3rOOrfj176TT%2FvDOtYtHGCIUOl9liPmCUPizFAMz3WBhYiZLJyHzstJbdnSVxnMJBAfqU6Cj6lBBsop1CNcJzg3Q4tBoviYqBXWhb4r658lPsi4HLntSmgCfPYw9u7SRF551u5wKIIpoYsYI6kqvoGO9h4RwHbF9gevco4KY3Z90BSwSr3jYH9xvJ9PxSEGEPOdCzT%2B6Rktv9AAgrZtcrN%2F0BMl08aHPYQ4LrbO8iDkccg6PG1MC7PhZ1Llq8IFicN8Q%2BFMWu8eUIfHGjwSQY3SpBKAkQ82SAOLl%2BXYCJiuhowYoujHNRyoNQ0S2ZPTjWffej7TEQqKsq8lDFd4K6LJGnDCOpzAbCOl0SrX1CZoJTXmoNC5TljNhmJju3zxQVrhLU3hbU%2F7F9kn%2Fk%2FtTRyYlPbu%2BcRBTxsMZET5cMtgbChrJPKCuoM4Bl6oSws%2F8YsL5pTzxFEyRYgfDZOR0%2Fp7GLBxKCRtkaDk8lkwuxH9MkiPDvIUKFZ7qhKEpBCppVZVO0WdJ7BM8x0nKSWMq3YmDg6XMQnvhIonuUqD0WyA%2FQZgqg%3D%3D|ampid%3APL_CLK|clp%3A2563228

 

And...of course...drill bits.....

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/144036950063?_trkparms=aid%3D1110006%26algo%3DHOMESPLICE.SIM%26ao%3D1%26asc%3D232900%26meid%3D35e650a975d8473c802cadd4caa5a2ed%26pid%3D101195%26rk%3D5%26rkt%3D12%26sd%3D194040227201%26itm%3D144036950063%26pmt%3D1%26noa%3D0%26pg%3D2047675%26algv%3DSimplAMLv9PairwiseUnbiasedWeb&_trksid=p2047675.c101195.m1851&amdata=cksum%3A14403695006335e650a975d8473c802cadd4caa5a2ed|enc%3AAQAGAAACEPJUVVGP5SkrYcDd6NzcsQWkCknbOp8WkCP77%2FN7G%2BK9vVsTBaMZMRTP4KOiUSQiLIszcgQfu8UIz3pKXR9niYVW0x0mSsxBo%2Bt0zQ1Q%2Brh1W7nZZ34ezIAyYn9P7oq3K%2FfJjxIZm9%2BX7EykvdVT7ASHkW%2FGryXpkoABtb%2Bubz9xv942VmVkPoSTEjV1z8llttKSlC1zN6Cqfcep15hvi6DCAyZQ5S7L5X0YKO53t7%2BgU4vodR36B7bXdceTDP%2FdpglanKOM6Uoh5K2ACmvFoNn7ks9xZ34OlucXLpIgyf1xn%2FXswU7xs%2FP7m8oXFionsKFz9JsdtZOMsjWrn1vjlw171UdpSnmBRBu%2BeeNJZImZ87mHF227Oyt6kD58G4VifiVoKdzaDPLxyG%2FF6RJGfqdXqBQuon3QmvTy20iH8lDNmWt2VHjsru1PSQZK%2FCdNgC5s8VunHU6AqARZikfdz0GvFBfipAOZsX60aWkCMRI6TMGEdQkk%2BKLhiM3HNOz6JxoKGqfIB%2BAwrvwlYjNKbbEwg%2B2yOWFnP3fbLneZe2s34uN%2Byh5aCcUYMneLe5%2F8y65NjvAMJEJOcHiJFaT%2BrZrv6ZtBCl40bHhcZmnKVIKh747zZf%2B9wyfLQpKK1R7PqtE%2BR05zibkdK%2BqX1RA2Sd3cjsTO0cRlAx2SCoBQ7LJ1rl0uJWmK%2Btcc0MfFx%2B5jww%3D%3D|ampid%3APL_CLK|clp%3A2047675

 

The deeper you get into the build...the more techniques you will develop...and skills you will acquire...along with the knowledge gained from asking for help and advice...which I applaud you for asking for...that show's a genuine desire to improve.

 

You are building this kit for enjoyment...and that shows through in the quality of your work...nice one mate :clap2:

 

Respect

 

Ron

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ron,

 

Thanks for this; I appreciate the links. I have a Tamiya pin vise that is working well for me, though some of the drill bits I have seem to be very sub-par. I will pick up some tungsten bits; I imagine those hold an edge longer. Some of the ones I have are being eaten up quickly working through the white metal. Thanks, as always, for the words of encouragement.

 

Best,

Andrew

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Hi Andrew,

be aware...carbide drills can be brittle...use a drop of dish soap (over here called washing up liquid)...just dip the drill bit in a drop to stop the white metal binding around it...reason you don't use oil being it will prevent the CA from bonding.

 

This set is very good value for money...and means you can relax knowing you have spares...https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/274305252956

 

 

Ron

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22 minutes ago, Octavian said:

Many thanks for this. I will go pick up some of the medium CA; that sounds like a good thing to experiment with. The gel is a bit thicker than is optimal, so I will definitely give the medium stuff a try. I appreciate all of the tips, and I will incorporate them into my technique; thanks so much.

 

 

Well Andrew I'm late to the party as usual. But you can see, as advertised, the lads here are a fountain of first class tips and info. And they're all superb builders.

I have had great success with gel, medium and thin CA's. But NO success keeping those %#$@(! bottle tips clean ! So I try to minimize using those right from the bottle.

One of my go-to techniques is wicking thin CA along tight fitting joins. That and 'tacking' with a dab just to hold position on two parts and then comprehensive adhering when fit is perfected.

To that end here's my 2 US cents contribution to the CA-use database. I think of it as my 'neanderthal method' - for it is really crude.

An age ago, I fashioned  a scrap of PE, 2 mm or so wide and sandwiched it between two craft sticks to make a handle. Actually made a couple of these in different widths but the key is they are about .010" thick and RIGID. I take a now-ubiquitous plastic spoon and support it on a block with a weight to hold it down.  I pour a small puddle of thin CA into the spoon, dip the PE in and apply a well-controlled amount where I need it. The CA has a very good working time before hardening on the spoon and the bottle is capped closed all the while - insuring freshness.

The really good part is that the flame of a small lighter will quickly burn off the PE  completely clean again. The one shown is about ten years old.

Works with the other CA's also.

Best / C

7.jpg

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Ron,

 

Thanks for the link to the drill bits; I will order a set (spares are definitely a necessity).

 

Codger,

 

From one Yankee to another, many thanks for these tips; I like the Neanderthal method, and it should be a good counterpoint to the Cro Magnon approach I have been taking! Yours is high-tech compared to my caveman technique, which consists of pouring out a puddle of gel and applying with a toothpick. Lots of new things to try out!

 

All best,

Andrew

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1 hour ago, Octavian said:

 

Ron,

 

Thanks for this; I appreciate the links. I have a Tamiya pin vise that is working well for me, though some of the drill bits I have seem to be very sub-par. I will pick up some tungsten bits; I imagine those hold an edge longer. Some of the ones I have are being eaten up quickly working through the white metal. Thanks, as always, for the words of encouragement.

 

Best,

Andrew

 

Just be aware Andrew...make sure the chuck on your Tamiya pin vice can accept the shaft of the carbide bits...if it's the slimmer version it may not.

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Ron,

 

Thanks for the heads up. The one I have has four different chucks, including a 3.2 mm, so it should be no problem.

 

All best,

Andrew

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2 hours ago, Octavian said:

Ron,

 

Thanks for the heads up. The one I have has four different chucks, including a 3.2 mm, so it should be no problem.

 

All best,

Andrew

 

Perfect mate...that covers all the bases :)

 

Ron

 

Edited by silver911
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I'm glad to learn from this build that I'm not the only person to have trouble with Tamiya drill bits. Cheap disposable Chinese bits have proven much easier to use on white metal and resin. 

 

Great work on the GTO! Thanks for sharing your progress. 

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8 hours ago, Michael Church said:

I'm glad to learn from this build that I'm not the only person to have trouble with Tamiya drill bits. Cheap disposable Chinese bits have proven much easier to use on white metal and resin. 

 

Great work on the GTO! Thanks for sharing your progress. 

 

Michael,

 

Thanks for the post, and the kind words. With such small bits, breakage is all but inevitable. What is more irritating is how quickly some of them lose their sharpness, just worn down by the white metal. You may be right that quantity over quality proves a more economically sound plan.

 

Best,

Andrew

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6 hours ago, Octavian said:

 

Michael,

 

Thanks for the post, and the kind words. With such small bits, breakage is all but inevitable. What is more irritating is how quickly some of them lose their sharpness, just worn down by the white metal. You may be right that quantity over quality proves a more economically sound plan.

 

Best,

Andrew

Try getting a block of beeswax and "stabbing" the drill into it before drilling. If you don't want to be aggressive then cosmetic beeswax works too. Also good on saw blades.

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7 hours ago, Jo NZ said:

Try getting a block of beeswax and "stabbing" the drill into it before drilling. If you don't want to be aggressive then cosmetic beeswax works too. Also good on saw blades.

 

Jo,

 

Thanks for the tip! Ron mentioned using dish soap as an option as well; I will experiment with these options.

 

Best,

Andrew

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Airbrush 'lube'...such as this works well...and will not prevent the glue from bonding.....https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/124709774065?epid=691352641&hash=item1d094822f1:g:IBsAAOSwNJ1gkd51

 

Or this one.......https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/303972173248?hash=item46c62745c0:g:A54AAOSws8FgeGKJ

 

And...as you use an airbrush...you probably already have some...if not...you really should get some anyway Andrew :)

 

Ron

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Ron,

 

I do have some Iwata brand lube that I use on the airbrush; good to know it's multi-functional!

 

Thanks,

Andrew

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Hello everyone,

 

I have made a bit of progress on the engine, some of which I am pleased with, other bits not so much.

 

Here is the engine as it currently stands:

 

11.jpg

 

I have mainly been working on the wiring; getting the HT leads in place was exceptionally difficult, and I had to start over a couple of times after bad initial attempts. I'm not entirely pleased with how they look right now. They don't look terrible from a distance, but closer up:

 

htleads2.jpg

 

ht-leads.jpg

 

They look a bit of a mess. The leads coming out of the distributors look worse, I think, than those going from the tube to the engine block. Part of this can be remedied with some clean-up (which I haven't done yet, as evidenced by the gunk on that right distributor and on the wires), but part of me wants to rip the leads out and start over. They are from the MFH box, and are .6 mm wrapped wire. Is there any easier type of cording or wire to use for this sort of thing? The rigidity of the wire made it more difficult, it seemed to me, rather than less. Honestly, I struggled with this part of the build; it was the most difficult part for me so far, by a wide margin. Any advice on how to do this better would be greatly appreciated.

 

I needed a break from engine work after that, so I have just begun the intricate process of making the Borrani wire wheels:

 

wheel.jpg

 

These should prove stress-free... (ha).

 

 

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On 6/14/2021 at 9:49 AM, danibear said:

 

Hey Andrew, 

       I just registered just for you!..... to try to reply your confusion about the Zero Paint metal/resin etching prime.  Since I used a lot and I can guarantee you I know your issue applying it!

 

       You didn't thin it enough, I know the bottle say thin it 1:1 with prime "mud" and hardener "liquid". However, most of the case, 1:1 is not enough, you will have to add more "liquid" to make it flowing more (say 1: 1.3). Test spray with a spoon until you can smooth finish. 

 

      ZP metal/resin etching prime is the best I used for metal and resin, and yes, I always get smooth finish, as matter of fact, the smoothest grey prime I ever had second to Finisher's grey prime (but it is for plastic only). If you polish the white metal surface good, you have get very smooth finish. 

 

     By looking at your images I guess you didn't thin as needed.  MFH white metal cast is low quality (or all white metal is like that?), but won't be that coarse.    

 

 

 

Danibear,

 

To follow up, I tried out the Zero etch primer again, thinning further as you suggested, and I got great results. Thanks again for the info!

 

Best,

Andrew

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Hi Andrew...don't get despondent with the wiring issues...I find it can be harder than dealing with 'solid' (metal or resin) pieces...MFH wires are known to be somewhat stiff.

 

I know it's based inn this country...but have a look...they are some of the best I have ever used on kits...and I have pointed others here towards them.....https://www.componentshop.co.uk/cable/ultra-thin-connecting-wire.html

 

Wheels are looking good mate :)

 

Ron

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Ron,

 

Thanks for this. The biggest ones I am seeing on the site are .28 mm; do you think that will be too thin? That is less than half the width of the ones I am using now. It would likely be easier to work with, but I'm worried it would not be substantial enough and would look out of proportion. Perhaps not, though. I have never worked with components like this before, so it is all new to me.

 

Best,

Andrew

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My mistake; I was in the "ultra thin insulated wires" section, and .28 was the largest it was showing me.

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