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MFH 1/12 '64 Ferrari 250 GTO


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Hello,

 

I am a new member here at Britmodeller, having joined up after several months of benefiting from the wealth of knowledge and expertise on this site. I have been getting back into scale modelling over the past year or so; I loved the hobby as a boy, and have found myself longing for a return. I have been working on a few Fujimi Enthusiast kits over the past year, and then I happened to discover Model Factory Hiro online. The detail and beauty of the kits astonished me, so I made the plunge and purchased the 1/12 scale 1964 250 GTO, which I have begun working on this past week, with no small amount of fear and trembling. I am creating this WIP in the hopes that the more seasoned modellers here will be willing to give any and all advice; this kit represents a big upward shift in sophistication and difficulty over anything I have previously done, and I want to try and realize the kit as it deserves. I have little doubt that I will make many mistakes.

 

To jump in, here are a few preliminary pics of the kit:

 

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Lovely box.

 

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Initial page of the instructions manual.

 

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Superb resin body.

 

After staring wonderingly at the contents of the kit for several days, I worked up the nerve to begin. Per my usual habit, and the instructions, I am starting with the engine.

 

20210513-154849.jpg

 

The camshaft and pistons were the first things to come together. A good bit of drilling and very careful application of CA later, and I had these six completed elements. Below are the two halves of the engine block.

 

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I opted not to paint the pistons or block, as I thought this would likely impede the movement of the pistons (which is such a cool feature of this kit). I washed the parts with mild dish detergent, cleaned up the molding lines, and scrubbed them with a brass wire brush. Here is the assembled block, which I soldered together with low-melt solder and a phosphoric acid-based flux:

 

20210516-135027.jpg

(It still needs a bit of clean-up)

 

At this point I made a mistake for which I am still cursing the day I was born. I carefully glued together the pieces of the camshaft, following the visual details of the instructions with (as I thought) extreme care and caution. However, I very stupidly glued the assembled piston units to the guide pieces meant to align the camshaft into the block (pictured below). The shaft cannot turn at all in the block if these are not left free to spin around the shaft, an obvious fact that I realized too late.

 

20210516-141704.jpg

 

Exceedingly vexed with myself, I took the assembled bits apart with the help of some acetone, but even still, many of the small pieces were bent or warped slightly in the process of taking them apart. A day or so, and much self-castigation later, I had the pieces apart, and set about trying to straighten any warping to the small pieces of the camshaft, in which I was partially successful. The whole thing came back together, but imperfectly, fitting into the engine block with some difficulty:

 

20210516-134913.jpg

 

As you can see, the pieces designed to hold the shaft to the block, over the small flanges in the block, do not line up after the third from the right. As a result, the pistons turned, but only a bit, and the block is a bit off on the left side, which may cause some difficulties down the line, but I don't think they will be severe. In any event, I am hard pressed to explain how I could have made so simple and ridiculous a mistake, but I did. I was hesitant to include this part of the tale, but I want to improve, so I decided to leave nothing out.

 

I will stop here for now; I have begun airbrushing other components with primer, but I will save those pictures and details for the next post.

 

I would be grateful for any and all feedback.

 

Respectfully,

Andrew

 

 

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Nothing wrong with making mistakes...just so long as you learn from them.

Even the high part count Fujimi Enthusist kits are a long way from the complex 1/12 MFH...and white metal is a whole different ball game to plastic...where clean up is usually minimal in comparison...with better OOB fit.

You have certainly done the right thing in posting a WIP thread...there are some MFH enthusiasts here you can call on...all will be willing to share your pain.

I look forward to seeing how you tackle this beautiful car.

 

Best of luck and welcome aboard :)

 

Ron

 

 

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Hi Andrew; Ron says it perfectly above; Fujimi is a long way from MFH. But I see you are quite comfortable with techniques, tools and most materials. And you're doing fine with the always difficult white metal.

Do not be so aggressive on yourself with the mistake. We've made thousands of them here. And it seems you've saved it rather well. I realize part of the joy of building a MFH can be working parts but I for one avoid them as I did on my Rolls. You honestly don't want anyone twirling tiny parts on a 2000 hour kit build - especially parts unseen when finished. However I do appreciate the 'moneys-worth' philosophy many have for an expensive kit.

Ron is also correct that we have some enormously talented MFH builders here who I am sure will stop by. Speaking of Ron, his is the work you should seek for fantastic finishes for 'realism'.

I will only add that some white metal builders have success using metal etching primers on that material. Surely you can ask and test to your satisfaction.

Best luck and thanks for a new thread to learn from. / C:wicked:

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2 hours ago, Malc2 said:

Welcome to BM!

Will be watching progress with interest.

 

M.

Malc,

 

Many thanks; I hope that I do the kit justice.

 

All best,

Andrew

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Posted (edited)
59 minutes ago, silver911 said:

Nothing wrong with making mistakes...just so long as you learn from them.

Even the high part count Fujimi Enthusist kits are a long way from the complex 1/12 MFH...and white metal is a whole different ball game to plastic...where clean up is usually minimal in comparison...with better OOB fit.

You have certainly done the right thing in posting a WIP thread...there are some MFH enthusiasts here you can call on...all will be willing to share your pain.

I look forward to seeing how you tackle this beautiful car.

 

Best of luck and welcome aboard :)

 

Ron

 

 

Ron,

 

Thank you for your reply. I rarely maintain any sort of online presence, but I knew immediately that a WIP would be a smart move here, as I am in brand new territory and there is so much to learn. I have read through many of your threads and tried to absorb your techniques, especially when it comes to painting, which I have been hugely impressed by. I am certain that I will have many occasions to call on your advice.

 

All my best,

Andrew

Edited by Octavian
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24 minutes ago, Codger said:

Hi Andrew; Ron says it perfectly above; Fujimi is a long way from MFH. But I see you are quite comfortable with techniques, tools and most materials. And you're doing fine with the always difficult white metal.

Do not be so aggressive on yourself with the mistake. We've made thousands of them here. And it seems you've saved it rather well. I realize part of the joy of building a MFH can be working parts but I for one avoid them as I did on my Rolls. You honestly don't want anyone twirling tiny parts on a 2000 hour kit build - especially parts unseen when finished. However I do appreciate the 'moneys-worth' philosophy many have for an expensive kit.

Ron is also correct that we have some enormously talented MFH builders here who I am sure will stop by. Speaking of Ron, his is the work you should seek for fantastic finishes for 'realism'.

I will only add that some white metal builders have success using metal etching primers on that material. Surely you can ask and test to your satisfaction.

Best luck and thanks for a new thread to learn from. / C:wicked:

Codger,

 

Thank you for the warm welcome and for your kind words. I appreciate your thoughts on moveable parts; that makes sense, and, in any event, those pistons will be locked up and invisible very soon as the rest of the engine comes together around the block, so it is less a tragedy than if I had screwed up on the body of the car, say. I have definitely studied Ron's threads extensively over the past few months, as I mentioned in my reply to his comment. If my work ends up looking a quarter as good as his does, then I will account my efforts a great success. Regarding etch primers, I am using Zero etch primer for metal/resin, and my experience with it so far has been good. There's more to say there, but I'll leave it for my next update.

 

Thanks again.

 

All best,

Andrew

 

p.s. As a general question to anyone, I am uncertain if there is a way to post individual replies to posts on this thread directly beneath the post itself, without the rather cumbersome "quote" option; I couldn't see anything about that in the site's FAQ, so I thought it worth asking here. If there is a cleaner way of managing individual replies, I would be grateful to hear what it is.

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Posted (edited)

In case it helps, I use a well-worn piece of Scotchbrite to buff white metal parts before priming them, and nothing else (I don't wash them at all). Then for primer I use Mr Hobby's Mr Primer Surfacer 1000. I use the same primer for resin and it works fine and with no risk of being pulled off by masking tape etc.

 

This is in sharp contrast to a different manufacturer's dedicated modelling 'metal primer' which I tried a while back: it didn't adhere to the metal at all, which given its product name was a bit of an epic fail.

 

Incidentally, I also have a rattle can of Mr Metal Primer-R, which I'm sure is equally good. But since the Surfacer is so good, I've yet to use it.

 

I adore MFH kits and it almost seems a shame to build them. I do often spend time just opening the boxes and (as you have) gazing at the parts in wonder. And though the initial outlay seems a lot, in terms of modelling per buck/quid/euro, I don't think they can be beaten.

Edited by Sabrejet
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Sabrejet,

 

Many thanks for your post; I am stoked about the kit. I found that the brass wire brush did a great job of cleaning up the white metal pieces, then I gave them a quick wash and scrub with Scotchbrite and a drop of dish soap in warm water, though perhaps the wash is unnecessary. As far as priming goes, here are some pics of a few of the engine parts I have primed with the Zero Metal/Resin Etch Primer. I'm not quite sure how to feel about the results:

 

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Closer detail:

 

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It looks (and feels) fairly rough to me, certainly moreso than the Tamiya fine surface primer I usually use. Apparently it is supposed to be a bit rough, to help 'key' paint to it, but I don't know if that is specifically for painting with Zero paints afterwards. I have used the Zero paint system before, but only on a car body, which yielded superb results. With the engine parts, though, my plan was to paint with Vallejo acrylic air paints from their metal colors, and I wonder if the slight roughness of the primer will be less than optimal when following it with other paints. Obviously I can simply sand the primer down a bit, but there's no point in making extra work for myself if there's no benefit.

 

If you, or anyone else, is familiar with Zero paints, I'd be interested for perspectives. For reference, I am using an Iwata Eclipse HP-CS with a .35 mm needle, spraying at between 15 and 25 psi.

 

Thanks again for your post.

 

Best,

Andrew

 

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8 hours ago, Octavian said:

Ron,

 

Thank you for your reply. I rarely maintain any sort of online presence, but I knew immediately that a WIP would be a smart move here, as I am in brand new territory and there is so much to learn. I have read through many of your threads and tried to absorb your techniques, especially when it comes to painting, which I have been hugely impressed by. I am certain that I will have many occasions to call on your advice.

 

All my best,

Andrew

 

Hi Andrew,

First off...thank you for your kind words about my techniques.

Secondly...feel free to ask as many questions about said techniques as you need to...but don't feel constrained to follow them to the letter...adapt them to suit your needs...they are very flexible...and can be used in many different ways.

This much I will offer...you mention in your reply to 'Codger' that you would be happy if your results were a quarter as good as mine...trust me...think more in terms of 'I like that result so I will use that technique'...that way...you won't constrain yourself by trying to replicate that exact finish...but rather...you will feel free to mimic and adapt it to your needs.

 

Regards white metal and 'etch' primers...I used them in my figure painting work for a very short time...but gave up on them...simply because of their 'granular' nature...they tended to clog fine detail...even when using self leveling thinners...although...on large figures or busts...that rough texture could be used to advantage for replicating rough cloth or materials.

 

It always comes down to enjoying yourself...believe me...we all see in the work of others...what we would like to see in our own but...the reality is...we are all unique to ourselves.

 

Ron

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Ron,

 

Thank you for your post, and for the wise advice; it is much appreciated. I am relieved, in one sense, to hear that you had the same experience with etch primers: i.e., a rougher, more granular quality, inasmuch as that indicates that it is a feature of the type of paint it is, as opposed to my applying it incorrectly. I thinned it down as much as I dared, but it was still fairly rough. I think it will work well for the body of the car, as I will be following it up with Zero paint and clear coat, which I think is great stuff, but perhaps I'll try something else for the engine parts as I don't want to lose any detail.

 

I am going to take a look at Mr. Surfacer as Sabrejet recommended. What is your preferred primer for white metal?

 

Best,

Andrew

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Incidentally, Mr Surfacer gives a smooth, thin coat. Texture is fine on rough-cast pieces but I wouldn't want it for machined or smooth surfaces. I use Zero Paints a lot but again use the Mr Surfacer first. It does seem to be an all-rounder and in fact it has been used as a barrier coat for painting plastics too.

 

I do sometimes get 'spackle' with acrylics if the pressure is too low or the paint is too thick. 

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This is very helpful; glad to hear that the Mr. Surfacer plays well with Zero paints. I will pick some up and give it a try. Many thanks.

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Andrew;

I can highly recommend this thread by my friend Endeavor featuring his 1/12 MFH Alfa. Sadly he has ceased posting in this thread in 2020 but it is a gold mine of information on these great kits. His work is meticulous and very research oriented. Hope you find it helpful:

https://www.britmodeller.com/forums/index.php?/topic/235034042-mfh-alfa-romeo-159m/

 

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1 hour ago, Codger said:

Andrew;

I can highly recommend this thread by my friend Endeavor featuring his 1/12 MFH Alfa. Sadly he has ceased posting in this thread in 2020 but it is a gold mine of information on these great kits. His work is meticulous and very research oriented. Hope you find it helpful:

https://www.britmodeller.com/forums/index.php?/topic/235034042-mfh-alfa-romeo-159m/

 

 

Codger (or Mr. C if you prefer, as I've seen many members address you),

 

Many thanks for sending this along; this thread was in fact the first one I found on Britmodeller (or one of the first) when I began researching MFH builds; excellent stuff. I had lost track of the thread, however, so this is a great reminder to go over it with closer scrutiny now that I'm down in the weeds of actually building one of these kits.

 

In general build news, I followed Sabrejet's advice and picked up some Mr. Hobby Primer Surfacer 1000 at my local hobby shop today, and some of their self-leveling thinner. Looking forward to giving it a try. I will hopefully have an update and some meaningful progress within the next day or two. Thanks to all who have offered advice already; there is a wonderful sense of community and camaraderie on this site, which is making the building experience so much richer.

 

All best,

Andrew

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26 minutes ago, Octavian said:

 

Codger (or Mr. C if you prefer, as I've seen many members address you),

 

Many thanks for sending this along; this thread was in fact the first one I found on Britmodeller (or one of the first) when I began researching MFH builds; excellent stuff. I had lost track of the thread, however, so this is a great reminder to go over it with closer scrutiny now that I'm down in the weeds of actually building one of these kits.

 

Andrew - Codger is both my name and description.  :devil:  No 'Mr.' formality needed although many are so kind.

Glad you found that on your own - it's a great piece of work.

C

 

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Hahaha. I wish I could say the same of my username, but fate denied my having Julius Caesar as an uncle: my one great sorrow.

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Ok, here is a brief update on the 250 GTO. I have been getting familiarized with Vallejo air paints, and I think they are wonderful. I took Sabrejet's advice and got some Mr. Hobby's Mr. Primer Surfacer 1000. I think they likely could have fit a few more "Mr's" into the name, but that aside, it is an excellent primer. I thinned it 1:1 with Mr. Color Levelling Thinner and got great results; much smoother than the etch primer I used initially. Although, I will say that the etch primer did just fine when I began spraying Vallejo, and I can't really tell an appreciable difference now that they are all painted, though maybe others can. (Apologies for the less-than-ideal photography).

 

For instance:

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The cylinder heads and crankcase cover were primed with the etch primer, and this is how they look after a few coats of aluminum and steel Vallejo Air metal colors (I tried to employ some of Ron's techniques as outlined in his Renault RE20 Turbo Thread, using a couple of different metal paints on the initial paint job). For comparison, here are the gearbox and engine block, both of which I primed with Messieurs Hobby and Primer Surfacer:

 

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Aside from the parts in the first picture being slightly darker due to a bit more steel paint than the others received, I don't notice too much difference, though the cylinder heads may be just slightly more textured. I any event, I am cautiously pleased with the results thus far, although I would be grateful for any feedback on anything I might improve on here.

 

Finally, here are the cylinder head covers, which were a lot of fun:

 

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They're still a bit wet here from a final touch-up spray and will need a bit of tidying, but I wanted to include them to show the textured surface that MFH got on these covers; it is just wonderful. I know that the horizontal lines and the "Ferrari" name are traditionally black on these covers, but at this size the word and lines were barely visible at all when they were black, so I opted to sand the paint off so that the detail could be seen and appreciated.

 

The next step is sanding flash off of dozens of very tiny components that will go in the cylinder heads, painting them, and then putting those together. I am having such a great time with this kit; it is my first time working with white metal, and I already feel like it is going to be hard to go back to plastic after working with this. It poses different challenges than plastic or resin, but I feel like the white metal is ultimately more forgiving, than plastic in particular.

 

I'd be glad to hear any suggestions or feedback; many thanks for reading.

 

All best,

Andrew

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It all looks fine Andrew...texture on covers is nice...and definitely benefits from taking paint off to reveal quality casting on logo and fins.

I would offer this...we all have a style...and our own individual tastes in how we present our builds and...whilst I have been fortunate to receive many nice compliments on my 312T build...I am under no illusion that many find my style not to their personal taste...which is fine.

This build is for nobody's benefit other than yours...if you are enjoying it...and are happy with your results...that is all that matters.

One thing I do know from my time on the forum...any questions you may have...will always be responded too with genuine knowledge and advice.

 

Crack on mate...I for one am enjoying your progress :)

 

Ron

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Ron,

 

Many thanks. I appreciate the feedback and advice. I will definitely go with my instincts rather than trying to strictly duplicate the techniques or results of others. I certainly am glad to have so many great resources on hand from all of the talented modelers on these forums though.

 

All best,

Andrew

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Looks good to me :). Glad that the primer advice worked. It's always a worry that when you recommend a product, it may not turn out to be so good for someone else.

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Thanks Sabrejet; the primer was great stuff, and I have been using the Mr. Color Levelling Thinner to thin my Tamiya acrylics too; it seems a very versatile product.

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I'm with Sabrejet on the Mr.Hobby primer,it just works,I pick some up whenever I manage to see it. Luckily I have two near shops,one is in walking distance. I also have some pages from I think Tamiya magazine building this very kit,it's buried in my library somewhere! Chris.

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