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Mercedes L 4500


Lummox

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And the detailing continues .... this is just a joy to follow ... top skills! 👌 

 

Keith 😁 

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6 minutes ago, Pig of the Week said:

I think the holes look the part, I'd be inclined to leave them, just imho... 

PS, it'd be very likely on a well used motor that the padding strip would have worn to the extent of falling off, leaving the bare metal flange with just the rivet holes.. I've had a few like that 😁

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The video shows holes and offsets in the sheet metal 1:43 front, driver's side

 

and at 3:38 the front on the passenger side

 

who knows if that is original, repaired post war or restored in the museum?

 

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On 26/03/2024 at 23:10, Pig of the Week said:

PS, it'd be very likely on a well used motor that the padding strip would have worn to the extent of falling off, leaving the bare metal flange with just the rivet holes.. I've had a few like that 😁

Yes, it was missing on my Series 3 when I bought it. I think it's supposed to stop the bonnet rattling on the front panel, which is a bit of a joke on a Land Rover where every single part rattles.

I like the idea of a row of holes, it seems more realistic to have a few missing bits.

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Well Easter is over, far too much lamb and chocolate has been consumed, the spare bedroom has been freed from visiting relatives and has reverted to a 'modelling studio', so I think it's now time for an update. But first some responses to welcome comments...

 

On 3/26/2024 at 9:18 PM, Keeff said:

And the detailing continues .... this is just a joy to follow ... top skills! 👌 

Thanks Keith, you really are far too kind 👍

 

On 3/26/2024 at 10:59 PM, Pig of the Week said:

I think the holes look the part, I'd be inclined to leave them, just imho... 

 

On 3/26/2024 at 11:10 PM, Pig of the Week said:

PS, it'd be very likely on a well used motor that the padding strip would have worn to the extent of falling off, leaving the bare metal flange with just the rivet holes.. I've had a few like that 😁

Cheers Mr P. You know, I think I agree with leaving the holes.

 

On 3/26/2024 at 11:59 PM, Jochen Barett said:

The video shows holes and offsets in the sheet metal

Ah yes, the video of the Stammheim museum example. Thanks for nudging my memory Jochen - I knew I'd seen the 'hole effect' somewhere.

 

On 3/30/2024 at 6:28 PM, Ned said:

Yes, it was missing on my Series 3 when I bought it. I think it's supposed to stop the bonnet rattling on the front panel, which is a bit of a joke on a Land Rover where every single part rattles.

I like the idea of a row of holes, it seems more realistic to have a few missing bits.

Cheers Ned. I'm going to run with the holes I think. It's gives a bit of interest, and I'm sure the driver won't mind the odd rattle. :wink:

 

Right, now for the update.

This is going to be a bit of a waffle I'm afraid, the subject being the electrical 'connector box' type thing that is visible at the top right of the firewall:

spag1.jpg

 

I'm starting to become a bit paranoid as to whether features in the engine bay of the handful of extant truck examples are period or not. Wartime pictures of the area are like hen's teeth so it's tricky to confirm whether the 'box' is post-war or otherwise. We do have a couple of pointers though. Firstly we have the new(ish) flak truck produced by Trumpeter. Downloading the instructions from Scalemates we see something that looks very much like our 'box' (we also see the lubrication pump thingy too discussed in earlier posts):

spag2.jpg

 

The only other evidence I could find was this picture of fire-trucks (maybe?) based on the L4500 chassis. I don't profess to be an expert on uniforms, but the chaps look to be in wartime garb to me, and is that a hint of the 'box' we can see (if we use our imagination)?

spag3.jpg

 

Persuading myself that the 'box' is wartime, lets have a look at it in more detail. There's four wires leading into the box from a rat's nest of wiring focused around what look to be 'choc block' type connectors. Wires into the 'choc blocks' appear to come from a hole in the firewall:

spag4.jpg

 

The 'strengthening rib' pressing on the firewall appears to flip from concave to convex just prior to the hole where the wires pass through:

spag5.jpg

 

So what's inside the cab where the wires pass through the firewall? The hole looks to coincide with a bank of connectors inside the cab below the dashboard. In the second image I reckon we can see the wiring passing through the hole in the firewall:

spag6.jpg

 

OK, there seems to be some kind of sense to the wiring, so let's see what we can do to replicate it. The flipping of the strengthening rib from concave to convex was a bit beyond my skill set, so instead I used a blocked off piece of brass tubing to replicate the 'hole'. A mix of lead wire of 0.3 and 0.2 mm diameter was threaded through pre-drilled squares to replicate the 'choc blocks'. It's all rather simplified, and in retrospect I should probably have used finer 'wires', but we are where we are:

spag7.jpg

 

Macro photography is a harsh mistress, but panning out a bit it doesn't look too bad. It gives an impression of 'business' which hopefully will look OK under a coat of paint:

spag8.jpg

 

That's it for now. Apologies for the ramble, cheers, and thanks for looking,

 

Paul.

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Like @Pig of the Week, I think the black box is a voltage regulator, or it's a like a bus-bar for distributing the power. 

Inside the cab, the silver circular thing under the dash looks like a relay, and of course the fuse boxes across the front.

 

Your rendition looks spot on Paul ... difficult to replicate scale wiring exactly (as I've discovered on my Jeep build!), but it looks right, so thumbs up from me  👍

 

As a suggestion, have you searched for a wiring diagram to help?  (I'm sure you will have, but thought I'd ask!) 

 

 

Keith 😁 

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I'm with @Pig of the Week as well. My Beetles had something like that under the rear seat. A bakelite box with chunky wires going to it. Something to do with using generators rather than alternators if I remember right.

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They have a promising part 1 but I'm missing part 2 (or any other continuation)

 

 

and there seems to be a parts list (GO AND GRAB THE PICTURES!) for sale

https://www.kleinanzeigen.de/s-anzeige/mercedes-lkw-oldtimer-l-4500-ersatzteilliste-90er/2642085711-276-5049

(but I don't see the date of print and it seems to cover a civilian version. Anyhow, it doesn't hurt to grab the pics).

And a cheaper offer with less pics BUT THAT IS THE Zusatzliste FOR RIGHT HAND DRIVE version of the L-4500 from 1954

https://www.kleinanzeigen.de/s-anzeige/ersatzteilkatalog-zusatzliste-mercedes-l-4500-rechtslenkung-top/2657007196-76-1714

 

A Lichtmaschinenregler / voltage regulator for a generator ("generator" as "opposed to an alternator") would belong "between generator and battery" and would have 4 contacts, 2 towards the generator, 2 towards the battery.

 

Exmaples for refurbished parts (they look spot on!):

https://kohl24.de/de/Einzelteile-/-Ersatzteile/Bosch-Gleichstromlichtmaschine/Gleichstromregler-Bosch-0190300036-0190300037-0190300049-0190300067-0190300070-0190300087-0190309002-0190309009-0190309019-0190309025-0190309030-0190309036-0190309038-0190350005?gad_source=1&gclid=EAIaIQobChMIqZePi5OnhQMVxqaDBx2tqwktEAQYCyABEgIIJ_D_BwE

 

https://kohl24.de/de/Einzelteile-/-Ersatzteile/Bosch-Gleichstromlichtmaschine/Gleichstromregler-Mercedes-Benz-Bosch-0190300012-RS/UA150/12/6-12-Volt-Original-Bosch?gad_source=1&gclid=EAIaIQobChMIqZePi5OnhQMVxqaDBx2tqwktEAQYAiABEgLTTPD_BwE

 

And NOS (no cross slit screws!)

https://www.kleinanzeigen.de/s-anzeige/bosch-oldtimer-lichtmaschinen-regler-0190309032-nos-bosch-299vb-/1893203275-223-18922

Edited by Jochen Barett
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Jeez man, you'll be pouring petrol in this soon and firing her up!

 

Lovely fine work and a joy to watch progress

 

Los

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  • 2 weeks later...

Methinks I'm overdue an update. I can't believe it's two weeks since the last post - where on earth does the time go?

First some belated responses to comments...

 

On 4/3/2024 at 12:25 PM, vaoinas said:

Nice little update, Paul.
I think it turned out very well!

Thanks Kristjan, it's very kind of you to say 👍

 

On 4/3/2024 at 12:36 PM, NIK122 said:

Really nice work. I think it's going to look great under paint 😎

Cheers Nik. Brass and stuff is great, but I must admit I'm looking forward to toning down the bling with some nice unifying paint.

 

On 4/3/2024 at 1:45 PM, Pig of the Week said:

That's brilliant , I have to remind myself how small all this stuff is 😁

I'd say, ( again going on my land rover experience) the box looks like a voltage regulator box to me.. 

Thanks Mr P. Hmmm, a voltage regulator you say <quickly opens search engine to find out what one of those is>. :wink:

 

On 4/3/2024 at 2:03 PM, Keeff said:

Like @Pig of the Week, I think the black box is a voltage regulator, or it's a like a bus-bar for distributing the power. 

Inside the cab, the silver circular thing under the dash looks like a relay, and of course the fuse boxes across the front.

 

Your rendition looks spot on Paul ... difficult to replicate scale wiring exactly (as I've discovered on my Jeep build!), but it looks right, so thumbs up from me  👍

 

As a suggestion, have you searched for a wiring diagram to help?  (I'm sure you will have, but thought I'd ask!) 

Cheers Keith, thanks for the info, and another vote for a voltage regulator. I agree with what you say about the challenges of replicating wiring to scale. I think our hobby is always a compromise between using materials that are over-scale (but workable), against true-scale (but unworkable). As long as it looks not too out of place it's close enough for me. :wink:

 

On 4/3/2024 at 3:20 PM, Ned said:

I'm with @Pig of the Week as well. My Beetles had something like that under the rear seat. A bakelite box with chunky wires going to it. Something to do with using generators rather than alternators if I remember right.

Thanks Ned. A voltage regulator it is then! It's always nice to know what the bit'n'bobs you're working on actually are (although I'll not pretend to understand what they do).

 

On 4/4/2024 at 12:04 AM, Jochen Barett said:

A Lichtmaschinenregler / voltage regulator for a generator ("generator" as "opposed to an alternator") would belong "between generator and battery" and would have 4 contacts, 2 towards the generator, 2 towards the battery.

Cheers Jochen. As ever, thank you for all the additional info. I might have known you'd come up with the goods, though if you'd provided those links earlier I might have made a better job of the voltage regulator. :wink:

 

On 4/4/2024 at 6:59 PM, APA said:

Always impressive Paul. Keep on keeping on ☺️👍

Thanks Andrew, I'll try my best. 👍

 

On 4/4/2024 at 7:35 PM, Kelscale said:

Jeez man, you'll be pouring petrol in this soon and firing her up!

 

Lovely fine work and a joy to watch progress

Cheers Los. If I do get it running, I could do with trundling it over to your paint shop. :wink:

 

Right, so what's been going on since the last update?

Well, I've been working on something I think I can actually identify (gasp, no, surely not!) If I'm not very much mistaken we can see a klaxon:

 clax1.jpg

 

We also see examples of a double klaxon, which is what Trumpeter provide in their flak truck:

clax2.jpg

 

We won't be greedy though, we'll just go for a single klaxon, so let's see what we can find. The spares box drew a blank, so I had to resort to the stash. Now generally I don't like raiding bits from unbuilt kits, but as luck would have it, I found a pair of klaxon faces in an update set for a Panzer II. Why there are two virtually identical faces is unknown (different klaxon manufacturers perhaps?), but the instructions suggest it's optional which one to use:

clax3.jpg

 

Anyhoo, not one to look a gift horse in the mouth let's nab one for use in our truck. A bit of sprue for the klaxon body, some etch off-cuts for a bracket, some wire for a cable, and we end up with a klaxon. I thought I'd stuff the end of the cable into the firewall 'hole', because, hey, why not?

clax4.jpg

 

Next, we circled back to where we started some time ago. Remember that lubrication pump that we talked about several posts back? No? Well here's a picture to jog your memory, along with a picture of the plunger thing in the cab that operates the pump:

clax5.jpg

 

These awful pictures attempt to show the pump being spruced up with a nut on it's 'spout', and a massively over-scale 'T' junction made from soldered brass tube. The second picture is a representation of the cab plunger:

clax6.jpg

 

The pump was then added, along with lead wire to represent the lubrication lines that traverse the firewall to termination points roughly in line with the leaf springs, or wheel hubs, or whatever else it may be that is actually being lubricated (the lines will stop there I'm afraid). Not forgetting the 'plunger' in the cab (which is not quite in the right place but I won't tell anyone if you don't!) :penguin:

clax7.jpg

 

And finally, to get away from all the unforgiving macro photography, let's have a couple of shots to give the firewall some context. Inevitably some of the detail ends up hidden (at least we know it's there), but generally the additional work brings to an area to life that would have been pretty featureless:

clax8.jpg

 

And that brings things up to date. Cheers, and thanks for looking,

 

Paul.

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2 minutes ago, NIK122 said:

Well I've run out of superlatives so what can I say!?

@NIK122 Perhaps we need to start scratch building some new ones?

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Outstanding work, improvisation and scratch building Paul!  It's all looking superb .... 👌 

 

Keith 😁 

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In total agreement with my learned colleagues above - stunning work and attention to detail as always!

 

    Stay safe            Roger 

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On 16/04/2024 at 16:49, Lummox said:

Methinks I'm overdue an update. I can't believe it's two weeks since the last post - where on earth does the time go?

First some belated responses to comments... +++

Cheers Jochen. As ever, thank you for all the additional info. I might have known you'd come up with the goods, though if you'd provided those links earlier I might have made a better job of the voltage regulator. :wink:

+++

clax1.jpg

 

+++

clax3.jpg

 

+++

Paul.

 

Sorry I was so late, but I needed the third party input "voltage regulator". Before that I thought it might be some sort of relais.

 

Anyway,  late again: German Hupen (Hupe one single klaxon, Hupen more than one) come from Bosch (not from Klaxon) and in case you search for or talk about "Hupen" be advised it is a German slang word like "bristols" (referencing precisely those, but not in the sense of helicopters or cars).

 

The real things for example (go grab the pics before the auctions are gone)

oval badge

https://www.ebay.de/itm/296353943534 (12V)

https://www.ebay.de/itm/385917198372 (12V)

https://www.ebay.de/itm/126351208603 (12V)

https://www.ebay.de/itm/384694814804 (6V)

 

circular badge

https://www.ebay.de/itm/394021009801 (6V)

https://www.ebay.de/itm/285806204929 (6V)

 

Oh, "Great work as always!" (makes me feel small and dirty watching you build)

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Make that "Hupen", Hupen is the noun, "hupen" is the verb. Egészségére! Or as our friends from the other side of the pond say: "Honk if you're horny!"

Edited by Jochen Barett
typo of the embarassing kind
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Learning German is probably a pain in the neck for some, but once you got used to capitalization of nouns you don't want to miss it. It helps to identify subject and object in a sentence fast(er). "time flies like an arrow, fruit flies like a banana" would be "Time flies like an Arrow, Fruitflies like a Banana" (still funny when spoken, easily understood when read in a book).

 

Before saying "Hupen" say "Streichholzschächtelchen" a few times.

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