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39 minutes ago, Bandsaw Steve said:

Hi @Vanroon

 

I remember talking to you about this as a possible project once at your place, back in the days when I was bashing the Mig-15 together. And yes - miraculously - I have finally gotten to it. Hope you follow along! 👍

I recall that conversation Steve. I also recall an earlier effort you showed at your home. 

Shall be tagging along on this build, best wishes. 

G

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A Touch of Nostalgia

 

I was going to write full post here with quite a bit of work in it as I have been quite busy and things are progressing well.  However it's Friday night and I've had a big week and I've just had a fight with this computer so I'm out of energy and am just going to write quick note and then go to bed.  I will aim to have a full update within 24 hours.

 

Anyway let's take a quick walk down memory lane. 

 

Here's a photo that dad took at RNZAF base Wigram during the 1980? 'Wings and Wheels' airshow. This shot was taken with his brand new Pentax P30 SLR camera complete with a whopping 100mm lense which was pretty damned flash in the day, especially since his previous camera was a fixed focal length Agfa Box Brownie.  This year's Wings and Wheels promised to be special because it was rumored that the RAAF was going to send a Mirage; and they did! 
 

As I recall it had to take off and land at Harewood (Christchurch international airport, about 10km from Wigram) because Wigram's runway wasn't long enough for this jet.  Suffice to say that this thing made a most impressive series of low fast passes. I still remember looking out towards Halswell and seeing this thing racking around setting up for the next run. I don't remember how many passes he made but it was a few and if I recall correctly this photo was taken on the last one just as he was about to pull up, light the burner and do a Saturn V zoom climb before heading back to Harewood. It was a great day and I can assure you that the RNZAF Skyhawk that came along a bit later was not to be outdone by this interloper! 

 

pV2Xy93.jpg

 

A couple of years later - when I was about 14 - I decided to scratchbuild a Kifr C2, which is kind of a Mirage.  This is the model that @Vanroon was referring to above.

yjb30bP.jpg

It's made of cedar from a window sill recovered during the demolishion of the Philipstown boy's trade school (near the Christchurch suburb of Addington). This was the school that I was dragged to each week through every winter term of primary school to 'learn' woodwork. I regret to say, I really did not enjoy it at all. The teacher was good and the intention of the programme was good, and it suited some kids really well, but not me.  
 

For me woodwork was all about pottering around in dad's shed and making whatever I wanted using any method I saw fit. At Philipstown we were told what to make and how to make it and there was always a deadline and  a queue of kids waiting to use each tool.  

 

It's hard to make one of these if there's a deadline...

 

So, many years later, this RAAF Mirage build is kind of revisiting this project and seeing if I've improved...

 

Keep watching folks,

I should have a proper update tomorrow.

Bandsaw Steve

 

 

 

 

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A big bunch of photos

 

I seem to have taken more than enough photos for this particular job so I'll try to write as little as possible and let the big bunch of photos tell the story.

 

In this case the first step was to wait until there's no noise curfew and revisit that first bandsaw cut. It was intentionally made a whole 5mm away from the edge of the paper pattern and it had to be bought in closer. (See the first post on this thread if you aren't sure what I'm on about).

FN9iqgS.jpg

 

See how strong Jarrah is. Even though the resulting slither of wood is less than 5mm thick it still hangs together coherently and is still a thoroughly useable piece of wood. The bandsaw cut is now much closer to the edge of the paper pattern.

dkeTFVr.jpg

 

When using the bandsaw for thicker pieces of wood it's important to set the blade to a true 90 degrees to the saw bench. After each cut check that the cuts really are square.  Here everything's looking good.

0m987ee.jpg

 

A bench sander (either belt or disc) is really useful for fine adjustment of shapes, especially for removing any thin excess of wood outside of the pattern's limits.  If you ever want to take up this kind of work make sure you have a bench sander of some description.

Vj0FQJq.jpg

 

Between the bandsaw and the bench sander it is possible to delineate a shape that's quite true to the original plans.  in this case don't worry about the nose cone, that's going to be dealt with separately.

bFLwvsd.jpg

 

Now we have to roll through 90 degrees and deal with the plan view.  Once again cut out the shape with a pair of scissors and...

BF3ZAF7.jpg

 

Stick the pattern onto the wood.  Here's the adhesive I use to stick the plans on. If you look closely you may notice that here I've stuck the underside view on the topside of the fuselage... twit! For now it's OK since the outline of the shape is identical whether viewed from above or below, but it needs to be corrected before I start marking out the undercarriage bay or the cockpit.

dYt1Pms.jpg

 

Here is the pattern stuck down.  One of the great advantages with using two pieces of wood held together with dowelling is that it forms a centerline for the model.  Here the printed centerline on the plans is lined up with the wood centerline.  This gives us the best chance of achieving symmetry and avoiding a 'crooked' model.

bPTjssh.jpg

 

You've seen this before. Just use the bandsaw to start cutting out the plan view.

28oeClV.jpg

 

Note that there are two cuts in this case, together achieving a nice symmetrical outline.

9OJ18YO.jpg

 

Cuts complete. Still a bit of cleaning up to do but you get the  idea. 

nOFcgYv.jpg

 

By this point I had corrected the 'underside pattern on the topside of the model' problem; so don't panic! Everything's under control. Here I've marked out the position of the nose-wheel undercarriage bay with drawing pins.  The pin-holes will permanently mark the corners of the bay even after the cross-section profile has been carved.

HWX6nZ8.jpg

 

Now use a razor blade to cut out the paper plot of the UC bay and at the same time etch its position into the wood.

AOyTkxN.jpg

 

Now carefully apply some white spirits to the paper over the UC bay to dissolve the glue that's holding the paper in place...

TerSUTl.jpg

 

so that it can be peeled off easily...

DHTYTdt.jpg

 

leaving exposed wood where the UC bay must be cut / carved out. 

bSiZnus.jpg

 

Repeat the process on top where the cockpit will be hollowed out.

ZR2Dl0N.jpg

 

That's about it for this post. In the photo below you can see the central fuselage / cockpit segment that we have been working on in the foreground.  The bigger block in the background will be the subject of the next post. 

9fD0zXx.jpg

 

Well folks - that was a big bunch of photos.  But I will probably need fewer from now on since many of the future posts are likely to be just variations on what I've shown in this one.

This method of scratchbuilding is, I think,  easier than many folks seem to believe.  There are a few tools that essential and a few basic skills required but really, once they are under control it's just applying the same processes to a variety of slightly different cases. 

 

Stay tuned and I think you will see what I mean.

 

Bandsaw Steve 

 

 

 

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A great project Steve and I will follow along with interest.

We used to regularly see Mirages flying out of HMAS Albatross back in the 70’s when I lived in Nowra.

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Great user icon @SteveMc.

 

Have you ever noticed how there seems to be a disproportionately large number of ‘Steves’ on Britmodeller?

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2 hours ago, Bandsaw Steve said:

Have you ever noticed how there seems to be a disproportionately large number of ‘Steves’ on Britmodeller?

No but there’s an awful lot of Marks 

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On 4/10/2021 at 2:30 AM, Bandsaw Steve said:

A Touch of Nostalgia

 

Here's a photo that dad took at RNZAF base Wigram during the 1980? 'Wings and Wheels' airshow. This shot was taken with his brand new Pentax P30 SLR camera complete with a whopping 100mm lense which was pretty damned flash in the day, especially since his previous camera was a fixed focal length Agfa Box Brownie.  This year's Wings and Wheels promised to be special because it was rumored that the RAAF was going to send a Mirage; and they did! 
 

As I recall it had to take off and land at Harewood (Christchurch international airport, about 10km from Wigram) because Wigram's runway wasn't long enough for this jet.  Suffice to say that this thing made a series of low fast passes that were genuinely impressive and I still remember looking out towards Halswell and seeing this thing racking around for the next pass. I don't remember how many passes he made but it was a few and if I recall correctly this photo was taken on the last one just as he was about to pull up, light the burner and do a Saturn V zoom climb before heading back to Harewood. It was a great day and I can assure you that the RNZAF Skyhawk that came along a bit later was not to be outdone by this interloper! 

 

pV2Xy93.jpg

 

What a great photo, bravo Mr Steve's Dad! You may be interested to learn Mirage 44 still exists. I'm very envious as I've never seen a Mirage in person, let alone tearing around the sky. Hopefully the HARS project with A3-42 bears fruit.

 

I'm following this with great interest. Woodwork like this is a black magic to me but judging by your previous builds I have total faith in you.

Edited by k5054nz
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2 hours ago, k5054nz said:

What a great photo, bravo Mr Steve's Dad! You may be interested to learn Mirage 44 still exists

 


Oh wow! 🤩 

 

I did not know that that particular airframe still exists. That’s great news! Thanks very much for posting that link I greatly appreciate it. That might be the colour-scheme sorted too - although there’s plenty to choose from.

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20 hours ago, Marklo said:

No but there’s an awful lot of Marks 

Yes, the Britmodeller website is a bit like the Spitfire. Lots and lots of different Marks.

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15 hours ago, Bandsaw Steve said:

Have you ever noticed how there seems to be a disproportionately large number of ‘Steves’ on Britmodeller?

Well, there would be, such a 'common' name! But 'Arnold' there's a name that epitomizes greatness. Arnold Palmer the great golfer, Arnold Schwarzenegger's eloquence, Arnold Ambrose - OK, maybe there's an odd-man-out! 😀

Regards, Jeff.

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15 hours ago, Bandsaw Steve said:

Have you ever noticed how there seems to be a disproportionately large number of ‘Steves’ on Britmodeller?

We have a similar situation in our local MVS unit. We have so many Daves that Mrs Martian, our Head of Unit, is considering sending out deed poll application forms to all of them in order to cut down on the confusion it creates. Strangely enough, whenever the name Captain Ahab is mentioned, everyone knows it is me that is being referred to: can't think why?

 

Martian 👽

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I once worked at an ATC radar unit where there were seven Johns ( including me) on one watch.

 

John

PS. Looking at the pictures It occurred to me that by this stage I would probably have amputated at least two fingers, being inherently clumsy I try to avoid sharp moving implements.

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On 11/04/2021 at 13:41, Biggles87 said:

I once worked at an ATC radar unit where there were seven Johns ( including me) on one watch.

 

John

Coincidentally  there are several establishments in and around Kalgoorlie that are famous for having seven or more ‘Johns’ in them at any given moment. 🤪

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This is how Mij Ure of Ultravox got his nickname, his real name is Jim, in one of his early bands  there already was a Jim, so they decided to call him Mij (Jim backwards) and it stuck. 
 

Hmm Bandsaw Evets, doesn’t sound right does it

Edited by Marklo
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The Big Central Bit

 

As I have said before on these pages I like to build models by starting with the biggest bits and add smaller and smaller parts until the project is complete.  Preferably the biggest bits are at the center of the model allowing the entire process to start at the center and work outwards.  The Mirage is a subject completely suited to this approach, so let's get on and build the big central bit.   

 

Once again I've chosen to use Jarrah, but since there's going to be plenty of beef left on this big block and no fine pieces taking large amounts of structural stress I don't really need jarrah's extraordinary strength for this job. I probably could have used any good-quality carving wood. This part will need to be split in two so that the central fuselage / cockpit module can slip in between them,  so I must work on two pieces held together on the centerline, rather than a single block. Hold two pieces of wood together in a vice and drill some holes for dowelling as shown. 

mAmxfav.jpg

 

In addition I'm trying something new to hold the blocks together. Here I'm drilling the first in a series of three smaller holes within the final fuselage outline. Note that I'm intentionally drilling them on an angle to the block.

Jqq53vJ.jpg

 

The holes are the exact right diameter to fit these these little guys that I found at a local craft shop.

7hEr0hP.jpg

 

Look! they fit nicely.  Being at different angles I'm hoping they will help hold the faces of the two bits more tightly together. Since they fall 100% within the perimeter of the final part they will still work even after the excess wood is trimmed away.

3uqv3FS.jpg

 

This is the first bandsaw cut on the starboard piece - it will define the profile shape of the main body of the fuselage.

W16sWWp.jpg

 

After that cut is made I can re-assemble the two pieces using the dowels to ensure consistent alignment and trace around the cut shape so that the two resulting halves will be identical.

UrCPS0r.jpg

 

See! Primary school work really.

iI6r67Q.jpg

 

Another bandsaw cut yields...

m9bEnDp.jpg

 

This! Which is looking promising.

vkvWSZd.jpg

 

As you can see, I now must cut a rebate for the central fuselage / cockpit 'module'.  Currently there's a couple of big bits of wood stopping it from fitting where it needs to go. I note that currently this looks just like something Chris Foss, the famous Science Fiction concept artist, would dream up.  All I need to do is paint this bright yellow with big Black Zig-Zag stripes and a few red highlights and it'd be done! 

nrDsdCi.jpg

 

Anyway - I chose not to make a 'Tribute to Chris Foss' at this point and will continue with the Mirage project instead.  To save tedious repetition I have added a red line to the photo below to delineate the rebate cut made on the starboard side to accommodate the central fuselage / cockpit bit. The same cut was made on the Port side.

xXkvWhP.jpg

 

So now it's time to start working on the plan view.

HrDVh0o.jpg

 

Same as before.  I'm sure you can guess where this is going.  Cut out the pattern and stick it onto the two topside as appropriate...

kgjyZm4.jpg

 

Cut each one with a bandsaw...

exei9sr.jpg

 

Quite a deep cut this one - just over 40mm deep - right at the limits of my little hobby bandsaw's capability . I'm thinking of upgrading to a bigger unit, but my little one is still as good as new and I don't have endless shed space or endless money so for now I think I'll persist with this little guy.

SCBmNPQ.jpg

 

Here's the result with both cuts complete.

TRhhxaG.jpg

 

Tidy up and make final small adjustments with the bench sander.

y7Z7Lwi.jpg

 

Now I trim off the various big excess blocks of wood that I no-longer need. Here the big bit aft of the aircraft is getting trimmed off.

Kiu7fRg.jpg

 

Leaving this...

713TTql.jpg

 

It all fits together nicely.  The big blocky central bits are looking promising at this early stage and that's about it for this post except for one additional comment:

 

Through this process I have learned something important; paper is incredibly strong. The two halves of the central fuselage / cockpit piece are now held together by nothing more than the two pieces of paper, one on the top surface and one on the bottom held on with nothing more than spray-on adhesive. The two halves are held together incredibly well and cannot be pulled apart regardless of how hard I try. Neither can they be slid about relative to one another.  This is the reason that I've subsequently added the big white block of plain printer paper that you can see above onto the rear of the main fuselage assembly. There's another bit on the lower fuselage also.  This paper - and hence the binding of the two halves - can be removed at will using white spirts.  This method of holding two blocks of wood together is so efficient that on some future occasions I believe it will be a viable alternative to dowels.   

 

Bandsaw Steve

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At least I can see where this is going now, very promisingly so too. I admit to having trouble visualising things before but that is me & the way I process stuff, rather than a comment on the eloquence of your descriptiveness Steve. :) 

Steve.

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Gidday Steve, those blocks of wood are certainly recognizable now as an aircraft-to-be. That idea of dowels has got me thinking a bit (yeah, I know, dangerous). And your idea of holding parts together with paper - have you taken out a patent of the idea?

     Regards, Jeff.

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6 hours ago, stevehnz said:

that is me & the way I process stuff, rather than a comment on the eloquence of your descriptiveness Steve. :) 

 

Yeah ‘the big central bit’ and ‘the middle fuselage / cockpit bit’ - Soooo eloquent! 😀

3 hours ago, Biggles87 said:

Beginning  to look a little Vigelante-ish now, you sure you got the right plans?  😜

Hmmm.... Vigilante.... hmmmm....

 

there’s a thought!

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Great progress Steve, now you have the two sections I can make more sense of the build, that just me being thick!!! It is very interesting that the paper can hold the two bits that strongly,  that's amazing.  

Chris 

 

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Nice project.

I saw first time a couple of years ago, at Shizuoka Model Show a club, which profuces scsle models from wood. In a eay, you do not find any difference to pastic models.

Never knew how to do. I will msil you next days some pictures.  In all respect, you do not have to worry about mistakes of a kit. And availability.

Happy modelling

 

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You sir.... ARE INSANE! In the best possible way! :)

 

This is going to be a treat for all of us. Thank you for sharing.

 

 

Best,

Nikola

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