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Laminating styrene sheet, glue ?


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Will be, in the near future, doing much laminating layers of plastic card...Tamiya liquid cement and the like will tend to warp and distort everything, and be problematic I'm told.

..interested in hearing any suggestions for a suitable adhesives ( and advice ! ) for multi layering plastic card / styrene sheet... 👍

Edited by Pig of the Week
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What are you building? When I altered the profile on my Vanguard nose, I employed a mix of card, scrap and Milliput

 

49000954343_7ec6032915_b.jpg 49000954448_5704a779b6_b.jpg

49146836872_1839f7c816_b.jpg

 

That avoided problems with too much glue and plastic and having to slather big glops (technical term🤣) of Milliput.

 

HTH

 

Trevor

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Posted (edited)

It'd be larger areas than that, plates on a 1/16 tank for instance,  plus diorama / building parts, wanting rather to build up flat layers ( with on occasion contours) , without it all going wobbly !

Edited by Pig of the Week
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Tube glue? I'm thinking not as hot as the thin glues, better contact between sheets, but takes longer to dry I think.

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I have seen that mentioned somewhere before, tho it'd perhaps be difficult to get even coverage with....

I'll have to try a few experiments with scrap bits I guess, I've probably got a tube of old humbrol somewhere :)

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I think I would try a contact spray adhesive - there's a whole range with various strengths. But it would get round the even coverage problem

 

The problem with poly glues is that they are designed to melt the plastic so unless you are using quite thick laminations, some visible distortion is likely.

 

Cheers

 

Colin

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Another photo on my Vanguard conversion shows the melted plastic area where I was rather vigorous with the poly glue! Contact adhesive I think is the way to go as suggested above.

 

Good luck.

 

Trevor

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I often use plain old cyanoacrylate ( i.e. CA ) glue for laminating; thin or medium type. No distortion due to "melting" the plastic, quick, and sands easily.

 

cheers, Graham 

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The CA superglues would stick reliably I'd think and the layers would be permanently bonded.t

It'd need a thin runny type of CA , I'll grab some of that ( I've only got thick at the mo) and add to the experiments list ! 👍

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2 hours ago, ckw said:

I think I would try a contact spray adhesive - there's a whole range with various strengths. But it would get round the even coverage problem

 

The problem with poly glues is that they are designed to melt the plastic so unless you are using quite thick laminations, some visible distortion is likely.

 

Cheers

 

Colin

Most contact adhesives are solvent based, they're liable to distort the plastic before you've even got it together, test on some scrap before committing to a model.

A few years ago I built a transport box for a small model ship out of corrugated cardboard stuck together with contact adhesive, when I got home and opened the box the model had gone all Salvador Dali just from the fumes from the glue 😞

 

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4 hours ago, Dave Swindell said:

Most contact adhesives are solvent based, they're liable to distort the plastic before you've even got it together, test on some scrap before committing to a model.

That's a fair point - I was thinking more of the type of thing we use for mounting artwork and the like which need to be safe

 

Cheers

 

Colin

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  • 3 weeks later...

Why must you use plastic?

 

Thin MDF plus PVA glue might suit some of those applications very well. So too might aluminium lithoplate stuck down with two-part epoxy arildite glue. Heavy cardboard can also be useful. 
 

Just saying!

👍

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