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Tamiya Tyrrell 003 Monaco 1/12


A_S
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Hi all,

 

After seeing Silver911's post recently and being encouraged to start one of my own, I thought I would do a thread on this build. I've had the kit for about 8 months and already made a start, but things were put on hold when a new arival appeared in october, meaning I had to clear my workbench up (conservatory table).. as you can see, it may be a challenge with said new arrival. all too curious...

 

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The next photo is all the detailing parts i've bought to detail up the DFV and various nuts and bolts. They include

scale hardware PE set

Ejan DFV hardware -distributor set/cam covers and MFH inlet funnel covers

various rivits and simulated nuts to detail up the gearbox, cam cover and the windscreen

cable ties and weldlines and tyre valves

Indycals tyre decals, which I am a bit disapointed with, as they are the full tyre... not sure i will use them as I think it will detract from the finished tyre.

various other bits and bobs

one thing I'd really like to add would be the throttle linkage, but I am not sure where to purchase the bits for that.

 

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You may notice the missing chassis/tub - thats at my parents garage for modifying/detailing, and I've not brought it back. I'll post of that in a minute

 

 

Edited by A_S
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Hi,

Great to see you post this up, I saw your post on Silvers thread and look forward to your progress.

For the throttle linkage I would use small scraps of Evergreen or Slaters plastic card and plastic rod which come in a wide variety of thicknesses and diameters.

Alternatively Albion Alloys sell a variety of micro metal tubes, the advantage is they are sized to fit inside each other as the diameters reduce.

Solder wire and copper electric cable core is also cheap and easy to get in a wide variety of diameters and can be wound round drill bits to make springs.

Hope all this helps!

 

Malc.

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Initial work started on cleaning up the chassis and working out how to fit the front suspension.

 

The kit build is a bit compromised by the fact that you can't build the chassis as one and then slot the suspension on. Its a hard one to explain

 

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The peice which you see I've held in place with the green and purple elastic band is not a great fit both in terms of where it joins the top of the tub and the radius of the curve on the suspension mount area - old kit of course, and needs to be fitted after you slot the front suspension through the 2 holes on the left of the picture.

 

In the real car this is all one peice, or at least does not have obvious gap lines between the rest of the tub and this part. In an ideal world I wanted to fit this peice prior to fitting the front suspension and then modify the front suspension (Below) with some brass/metal rod and tap a thread so i can secure with nuts and bolts. This would allow me to build the tub as one and fill the gaps with filler, plus fill and then file a nice radus onto the ill fitting suspension mounts (no picture but from side view the bottom of the tub does not match well with this part and there is a ledge/offset between the 2. I might be able to post a better picture later).

 

However the top suspension arm is very fragile and I daren't risk drilling it out for fear of ruining it. No problems if spares were plentiful, but the only opitions seem to be a replacement full sprue at £25 plus £15 P&P from Japan, or finding a scrap one on ebay. I've seen a few of these and even the scrap ones seem to go for between £30 and £40. on the picture below, I'd have to remove the angled bar on the left of the photo and drill out the 2 circles on each end. without a spare part to test this its not worth the risk

 

So I've decided to build it as intended but through gritted teath, you won't see the join lines once the cockpit cowling is ontop of this anyway.

 

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After going down a blind alley with this one, I decided to start modifying the chassis to take the (lovely) scale H/W PE cockpit detail. I won't be painting this, I'm going to leave it as raw metal because it looks fantastic. Bit disapointed the rivit detail is picked out as holes and not raised rivits though. If anyone knows a good supplier of rivits that would fit and can be bought in bulk at a good price i'd buy some and fit them.

 

To get to this stage it involved use of the old demmel to knore away at the moulded weld lines.

 

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looks a mess, but it was hard to access with a circular cutting tool, so i had to use a straight tipped bit and chissel it away.

 

 

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looks fantastic doesn't it, and thats without the pedal asembly which also comes with the PE kit. you can see the ill fitting suspension mounts in the top left of this pic. not a great representation but the top peice doesn't really line up with the bottom, a lot of filling has been done to get it to this stage.

 

The only bit left to modify was the moulded in front radiator mounts. 

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These were sanded off with a sanding stick and rebuilt with Brass. Luckly as a result of building O Gauge Brass locos in the past, I have an abundance of brass rod and low melt solder plus a really good soldering iron. I could have gone the whole hog and rebuilt the side mounts as well. The scale HW set includes etches to rebuild the side mounts but i found them far too flimsy and hard to bend. I must have spent hours trying to do so, with the help of my dad (Whose building a 7 1/4 inch scale live steam loco - so has all the equipment necesery) and neither of us could get the required bents right and to look "nice". we even made a jig for the second one and still it looks just as messy as the first. Note: again you can just about pick out the poor fitting of the chassis top around the suspension arm mounts here. As you can tell, this really annoys me!

 

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Edited by A_S
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The most useful part of my tool kit is a set of micro drills, the first thing I did when I built mine was to drill out the front suspension arms so they could be fitted post paint.

 

M.

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Hi Malc - yes I have some micro drills and a pin vice from my o gauge days, but i'm worried about doing as such because its such a fragile part, hard to replicate the bend accuratly and a spare would cost upto £40 as mentioned!

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So then I was just left to pull it all together and build up as much of the chassis as I could. This is where i came across my first "oh crap" moment where i made a stupid oversight  by either forgetting something or doing it too quickly without thinking (I do a lot of these...).

 

The chassis comes as 3 parts, one is the base and sides, 2 is the cockpit cabin and 3 is the ill fitting top suspension bit at the front. I'd been holding it all together with elastic bands as this gives tension and held it all in place quiet nicely, better than i could with my fingers when gluing.

 

as you can see from the 4th picture in the previous post the cockpit section is joined to the sides along the leading edge, both of which are full of rivet detail. luckily there is a join line there on the real car so no need to fill and sand. However glueing would have to be through capilary action from underneith.... I decided to leave the elastic bands on being careful.... unfortunatly capilary action as such created a right mess around one elastic band.... and then my finger as i was holding it tightly in place waiting for the glue to dry... oops. As you can see, hours of clean up to get it to this stage as there is lots of fine rivet detail to avoid. I'm hoping it comes out ok primed and then I can finish it off with a dash of water based putty and it won't be too noticable. I'll also route some cables around here to take away the emphasis on the mucked up area!

 

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at this point I also sanded off the moulded on body clips, built the front wing and filled the join lines nicely with putty.

 

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Edited by A_S
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Really pleased you decided to post this build Andy :)

 

Some really good work already...and with all that detailing stuff to hand...this will be one to watch.

 

Regards the SH PE...be aware...it's Nickel Silver and will eat drill bits...what you ideally need are carbon faced drill bits and plenty of lube...also a drill stand (if you have a milling machine even better) to work on.

I was very disappointed in the SH set for the 312T...etched rivet detail is hard to get looking right...but being lazy...I wasn't up for all that drilling.

 

What size rivets are you looking for?

 

Ron

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Thanks for the heads  up. I don't think the rest of the PE set needs any drilling, just some soldering perhaps rather than using glue but I've yet to look into it in a lot of detail. The only thing I would perhaps drill would be drilling out the cockpit sides seen above to take some rivits but i am luckly that I do have access to piller drills/milling machines etc. In terms of the sizes its hard to judge until you see things in person and get an idea of scale - I'd guess the size needs to be about 0.5mm or less but like you say i am not sure the effort is worth the benefit as there would be a lot to drill out and fit!

 

I still need to read through your Ferrari build, looking forward to that later.

 

My next steps on the tyrrell, now the garage is getting more appealing (less cold) would be to

 

1.) Re-chrome some of the suspension parts - I posted a topic here to get some recomendations for chroming workflow/process 

 

 

2.) prime the body parts pending a final decision on what I do with the suspension, i'm still tempted to drill out

 

3.) Decide on a colour for the DFV. Most people seem to paint their blocks in a silverish glossy paint but all pictures I see of the DFV fitted the colour is more of a pale white metal colour. I haven't quite found the right colour yet. some discussion was had here

 

 

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With regard to the DFV ali shade...my instinct would be to use a mix of Vallejo Metal Color's "White Aluminium" + Matt White (50/50 mix)...which will get you very close to this shade...and can be fine tuned if you need it darker/lighter...

 

dfv-82-sa.jpgdfv-oil-and-water-pump.jpgford-cosworth-dfv-belgium-1977-by-f1-his

 

Obviously...I would use oil paint to achieve the many subtle colour changes...but this can also be done with some gentle washing if you choose.

 

Ron

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Thanks,

 

I might just try that. As per the thread I had tried the pale burnt metal and the dull aluminium but neither seemed to fit the bill, although the pale burnt metal on my test spoon did give a nice finish once i learnt how to get it to spray well out the airbrush.

 

The problem with wanting to test all these colours is the cost, a bottle of tamiya costs about 1.65 at my local shop but a Vallejo is 6.50 so i could test 4x tamiya for the price..!

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For throttle linkage, RB Motion will have some http://rbmotion.com/rbmshop_3.0/index.php?route=product/category&path=110.  You can order direct, but since Brexit, Bestbalsakits in NL don't appear to be shipping to the UK, @silver911may know more on this as he uses them a lot and they stock the RB Motion stuff too.  Add duty to the prices though, you will have to pay this before delivery.

 

I assume you have looked at Masterclub for resin rivets, nuts and bolts?  Historex Agents stock these, and if they are not structural an inexpensive alternative.

 

Got the Ebbro 1/20th one of these on the shelf but will be building the Cevert version and not the hammerhead as well, so watching with interest.

 

Tony

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Thanks for the tips - don’t assume anything. It’s quite late now so I’ll have a look at those sites tomorrow.

 

regarding your Ebro 003 - it looks a lovely model - but I’ve not seen it up close in person. Something you might be interested in - Indycals do a translucent oil tank. They do them in both 1/12 and 1/20 for both versions of the car (Tamiya and Ebbro as far as I can see). I’ve already purchased one for this build.

 

https://www.indycals.net/parts/f1parts/tyrrellfluidtanks.html

 

 

I had looked at br motions site but didn’t spot any linkages. I’ll look again. Other option is to scratch build as suggested by Malc above. I will consider both options once I get to finalising the block. Off the shelf as long as cost is reasonable would probably be my preferred - as much in a time saving benefit kind of thing.

 

I stumbled across th best balsa kit site from one of Ron’s posts earlier - it looks like a treasure trove. By just searching for Tyrrell I came across some wet tyres for the p34. I’d have loved to put some wets on it. From memory apart from the race it was a wet weekend (weekend of a champion is a great documentary). Unfortunately on googling the supplier, they don’t come in the right format for an 003. I need ones with the blue ring and ideally raised detail to Match the real thing. 
 

despite that I’m lucky to have friends in the Netherlands - so if I do need anything.... I know where to go!
 

spent a bit of time in the garage this evening. Test primed some plastic spoons and forks. 2 reasons. I plan to make a click and collect order from my local model shop tomorrow as they stock Vallejo and try out the block colour. I’ll also get some scrap etch and try out rechroming on those without the step of using a 2k clear coat on top of a gloss black undercoat and then chroming over the top as suggested on the video posted in my thread above. 
 

the other reason was to test the zero paints primer. Previously I’d had a bad experience with their ‘filler’ primer which was more like sand paper than paint and required a hell of a lot of work. Not practical with so much rivet detail here. I’m pleased to say it went on more like the Tamiya spray - a nice smooth finish.
 

im itching to start making tangible progress but stuck in that not sure what to do phase - so I keep using ‘testing’ as a reason for procrastination.

Edited by A_S
My poor spelling, bad iPad finger work and autocorrects!
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12 hours ago, Malc2 said:

The most useful part of my tool kit is a set of micro drills, the first thing I did when I built mine was to drill out the front suspension arms so they could be fitted post paint.

 

M.


i still keep coming back to this. I really want to do it and if spares were plentiful I would, but they are not. How much risk was involved when you did this? I ha d no doubt I could easily saw, drill and ream to correct dia. But ensuring that the car then sat flat is my worry as much as anything else. 

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Really nice to see another vintage DFV under way - so many interesting parts of this build to see!  Regarding Ron's note above about drilling the PE for rivets.  I've had the same problems drilling the PE (tho in 1/20, maybe more of headache because of the smaller bit diameter), and will attest, the process is tough on bits and patience - both of which you need to get it done!  If you come across some bits that are tough enough to survive, please post who makes them, or where we can find them too!  RB Motion makes lots of interesting and useful bits - they might not have the exact kit you need for a linkage, but you could probably mix and match their parts to fabricate your own.  The throttle assembly on some of the DFV engines is pretty straight forward, so you might be able to fabricate something out of a few RB bits and scrap materials.  

 

OK, looking forward to your next update!

Cheers

Nick

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23 hours ago, A_S said:


i still keep coming back to this. I really want to do it and if spares were plentiful I would, but they are not. How much risk was involved when you did this? I ha d no doubt I could easily saw, drill and ream to correct dia. But ensuring that the car then sat flat is my worry as much as anything else. 

 

Looking at your picture of the part that is causing you a headache...it's very similar to what I did on the rear arms of the 312T (see page ten about half way down)...and you have a slightly easier task...as once you remove the kit moulded bar...you have perfect angles from which to drill out the holes for a replacement bar...and...as you have already shown...you have excellent skills with tube and solder.

A tip/trick for you that many on here already know and use...especially me...get a fine needle and lock it in a pin vise (needles are steel...so are not going to bend easily...you only need 5 mm out of the jaws)...then use this to create a dill bit guide...by twisting it into the plastic as if it were a drill...in doing this you are avoiding the tip of the drill bit wandering off centre.

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Good plan - I have a set of reamers that I usually use to create a guide but that would work well too.

 

the main issue is - if I mess it up - it’s going to be an expensive fix! The spare sprue that has been on eBay @ £40 is now gone so that’s no longer an option...! I’ll ponder on it more.

 

I spent tonight in the garage priming all my suspension that needs re-chroming. Initially I only meant to prep a few bits for testing but after having a lightbulb moment on why the re-chroming process decided to prep all the parts I needed to do. Unfortunately being a 70s kit - the priming exposed some further filler work I need to do for some injection mould circles. I had filled them but they are still visible. I never seem to get them right first time. Usually takes 3/4 attempts to fill, prime, fill etc before I can get rid of them - so I’m going wrong somewhere with my technique!
 

the lightbulb moment was realising that the only reason my tutorial (scale modeller Channel on YouTube) painted black and then 2k clear coated BEFORE the chrome was because he was using zero paints and they dry matt. Hence the need to clear coat in this instance. So now I know that I don’t need to clear coat - I’ll get my hands on gloss black Alcalad tomorrow and then it’s only to gloss black and straight on with the chrome without the faf of 2k clear coating and waiting days in between.

 

I also tested the white aluminium with a spot of matt white. Colour looks good. I may spend the weekend trying some other combinations and adding some pale burnt metal in and just testing to get a good formula - but I need some more time for that.

 

one problem I did have was spraying the Vallejo. I’ve had it both with the pale burnt metal and the white aluminium. It comes out the airbrush like nothing I’ve ever seen before. My airbrush is a 0.35mm needle and I can restrict the travel on the needle/apature. So restricting to 1/3 full trigger travel and spraying it at 15 PSI it was like a waterfall. it wasn’t running but was giving a sort of bubbly finish which when drier left what can be described as water marks. It was as if you had washed a car window, a tinted one or the black surround and forgot to leather it down!

 

10 psi was not much better, 5 was getting there but still not a uniform finish and 2 seemed to give me the control I needed without the nice metallic finish - but one that might suit the DFV. However I will need to find a solution that offers me a bit more control. Spraying at 2psi seems nuts. I spray the zero paints primer and thinned Tamiya at around 15-20 psi with the trigger restricted to a max of half way to give an example of the difference between normal usage and the Vallejo acrylics.

 

I’m on my phone tonight so I can’t upload a photo to one drive and link it. Will do that tomorrow.

 

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What AB and compressor are you using?

What distance are you spraying at from the surface?

Also...have you put an agitator in the bottle of paint (I use 3 mm stainless steel balls from ebay...2 per pot)...than shake until no colour/pigment shows on the bottom of the bottle.

Are you using any additives?

 

10psi - 12 psi should be perfect with a 0.35 nozzle/needle set.

 

How dry is the air in the garage...and what's ambient temp?

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Airbrush is an Iwata eclipse. Compressor is one from amazon, generic band thing. It seems to work ok...

 

distance is about 5-6cm

paint already has a ball in there I believe. I shook for 2/3 minutes but will make a note to check the bottom of the bottle tonight.

no additives

garage was dry and heated with a small fan heater all day prior to my arrival. certainly wasn't cold, I'd take a guess at about 16 deg C but its only an educated guess. I wasn't cold in there.

 

on my work computer but I will add some photos to this post in a bit

 

spoon on the right was sprayed at 2 PSI other 2, left to right were 10 and 15. As you can see, its not gone on too well. No runs at 10 or 2 but a funny watermark like texture.

 

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plus some work to clean up the 70s mouldings still. Those injection pin marks are a right pain, as they are hard to access for sanding. Bare in mind the photo magnifies the part aprox 3x!

 

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Edited by A_S
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Sorry to be a pain but can you post a pic of compressor later please Andy ?

 

Re the ejector pin marks/holes...instinct tells me you are under filling them.

If they are deep...I prefer to use thin CA...use a cocktail stick or a pin to drop a few drips into the hole...and it will self level...obviously you need to keep the part level until it dries to avoid it running out.

Edited by silver911
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I think I can see where you are going with this...! There is a bigger heavy duty one I could use as well. not sure it would be more accurate! I'll grab a picture.

 

RE the mouldings - it seems to shrink, I think I've filled this and sanded twice. never seem to get it flush..!

 

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no picture yet, unfortunatly I haven't been able to spray tonight. Another kind of Spreying. My Cat had her "op" today and has been a bit of handful since. keeps taking her coller and T-shirt off... so i've had to stay indoors. hopefully can get out tomorrow if she is a bit more settled.

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