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HMS Cumberland Type 22 Frigate (Batch 3) Atlantic Models 1:350


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HMS Cumberland Type 22 Frigate (Batch 3)
Atlantic Models 1:350

 

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I must admit straight off that I have a soft spot for the Type 22 Batch 3. I was present at the Launching of HMS Campbeltown, and worked on fitting her out as part of my apprenticeship. The Batch 3 Type 22 Frigate had developed a fair way from the original Broadsword Class first ordered in 1974. The Class were primarily designed as anti-submarine ships to protect convoys under the UK's commitment to NATO. The length at the time was dictated by the dimensions of the undercover Frigate Refit Complex at Devonport Dockyard. As well as sonar system they were fitted with torpedo tubes and would carry the Lynx Helicopter. Offensive armament was provided by 4 canister mounted Exocet missiles on the foredeck. The primary defensive armament was 2 sextuplet Sea Wolf missile systems.  By the time the four Batch 3 vessels were ordered a more general class of ship was needed, it had been released by the RN that ships really still did need a Gun and the bow space again was taken by a 4.5" turret. The ships did not loose their missiles though as the 4 Exocets were replaced by eight Harpoon missiles on two quartet launchers mounted up behind the bridge. The defensive armament was enhanced by fitting a 30mm Goalkeeper CIWS. Extra accommodation space was also fitted in allowing the ships to host a flag officer and become command & control centres. Propulsion was obtained from 2 Rolls Royce Tyne Engines and 2 Rolls Royce Spey Engines, the Speys replacing earlier Olympus Engines. These gave the vessels a top speed in excess of 30 Knots and a better sea keeping ability. Names  for the 4 batch 3 ships were a mixture, though all celebrating different parts of RN history. a mixture: Cornwall and Cumberland, revived County-class names previously carried both by First World War-era cruisers, and by Second World War-era County-class heavy cruisers. The other two Chatham and Campbeltown, were Town names, the former reviving a 1911 Town-class light cruiser name, and the latter commemorating HMS Campbeltown famous for the St Nazaire Raid in 1942; the name for HMS Chatham was also selected as a salute to the Medway town, where the Chatham Dockyard, established in 1570, had closed in 1984. While most of the earlier Type 22s were sold to overseas Navies all 4 Batch 3 Ships were scrapped well before the end of their projected service lives :( 

 

 

The Kit

The kit comes in the standard sturdy Atlantic Models box filled with plenty of poly chips to protect the contents. The metal,  and resin parts are contained in zip lock bags stapled to a piece of card.  The upper and lower hull sections are further protected from damage, by being wrapped in bubble wrap.  There is a long envelope found at the bottom of the box containing a large sheet of etched brass, whilst a separate zip lock bag contains the sheet of decals.  When the impressive 42cm hull is unwrapped the first thing that strikes you is the cleanliness of the resin.  It is really smooth, with no sign of deformation, bubbles, or other imperfections. The upper and lower hulls are joined together by several pips and holes, but I find that it’s easier to remove the pips and align everything by eye and by feel as they tend to leave a large gap whereas by removing them, the gap almost disappears and there is very little need to filling, just a light touch with a sanding stick.  The rest of the resin parts are just as well moulded, although the large sections of the superstructure do appear to have small pips on their undersides that may need to be removed.  As seen in the photos, some of the smaller parts have a fair bit of flash, but it’s very soft and easily removed. The white metal parts don’t have a lot of flash, but there are seams that will need removing, again, a fairly easy job.  The large etch sheet is what we have come to expect from Atlantic Models, beautiful clean relief etching, great design and lots of parts, and is probably the area that makes these models more for the experienced modeller than even the resin.

 

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Before any construction can take place, make sure you clean all the parts in warm soapy water to get rid of any mould release agent that may be attached. Naturally for these kits, it’s sub assemblies first. This is mainly the main deck house The bridge goes on at the front with the foremast at the rear. In between these goes the forward Sea Wolf tracker and the Goalkeeper CIWS. Behind the main deck house sits the intake housing for the engine room and behind this the funnel. Between the funnel and the hanger goes the rear mast. 

 

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Now these main parts are on its time to make up a whole host of smaller parts for mounting to the ship. The 4.5" turret gets its gun. Then the main mast top antenna array is built up. The Goalkeeper gets its barrel and to the 30mm Oerlikon DS30 guns. Two quad Harpoon launchers are built up from a PE frame with resin missile tubes, the PE blast shields to go behind them. The type 911 Fire Control Radar is built up as are the Sat Com platforms. The DF antenna for the bridge roof gets built up, and if you are fitting them the  mini gun enclosures.  Last up are the decoys and their ejector racks.  The gun goes on the fore deck and the forward Sea Wolf launcher behind it in front of the bridge.

 

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The main fore mast is next with the main radar on top followed by the many PE arms and other parts including a navigation radar being fitted. The Sat Com antennas are fitted to the Engine intake block, here there are PE railings to fit and also ladders which go on the front of the intake covers. The rear mast is next with the main antenna pole and antenna array being fitted to the top. Here again there are many PE arms to the mast and smaller fittings. To the front of the hanger the crane for the ships boats is fitted, and the boats in the landing area there.  Along all the main decks PE railings are fitted  with netting type areas next to the 30mm deck fittings. There are also life raft canisters to fit to the deck. There are also man overboard life ring ejectors to fit. 

 

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Moving aft the rear deck goes on, and to the starboard side of the hanger the ships gangway. Above this go additional life rafts and the fuel can stowage racks to the inflatable boats. Above the hanger and on the rear Sea Wolf Radar platform more railings go on. Forward of the hanger deck there is another small boat crane, and forward of that the two triple torpedo tubes. Moving back to the flight deck the harpoon grid is fitted to the centre, and around the outsides the flight deck netting is fitted. If you want to close the hanger then a PE door is supplied for this.  The aft Sea Wolf launcher is fitted to the hanger roof. 

 

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Next we move to the lower hull with two stabiliser fins being added to each side. The propeller shafts go on, with the props on the ends and the ships rudder behind these. We now jump back to the main deck. Davits are made up for the main ships boats. There is also a late fit RHIB platform to be fitted on the port side of the funnel These are for the late fit Pacific 24 RHIBs which replaced the Cheverton on the starboard side. The data link radome is now added to the front of the hanger deck. For Campbeltown use the solid mast, for other ships cut the radome off and use the PE lattice mast. 

 

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Decals
The single decal sheet contains the main pennant numbers and ships names for the 4 ships as well as Ships Crests, Flags, Ensigns, draft marks and helicopter landing markings.  

 

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Conclusion
Well, Atlantic Models have done it again, producing a kit that fills another hole in the Royal Navy Cold War story, that of the last of the Type 22s. This is not a kit for the novice but it will with time and care build into a great looking model. Very Highly Recommended.  This last shot shows the main upper casting with the main parts added as a dry fit to show how well the fit and to give an idea of how the kit will end up looking even without all the detail parts fitted. 

 

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Review sample courtesy of Peter Hall of spacer.png

 

 

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At last, what a fabulous looking ship and kit this is. Thanks for the review.

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Excellent review and history Julien.  I just need to talk to my budget holder about this lovely kit, but she has gone to bed!

 

Mike

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