Jump to content

Biplane trial


tnuag
 Share

Recommended Posts

Using CAD we can do any scale - routinely 48 and 72, This exercise is a trial of CAD and 3D printing because the level of detail now possible is superb.

 

I regard MSLA as the biggest step forward in decades.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 months later...

Yes, the Blackburn is finished and printed - to quote a friend, it clips together and stays together without glue. Another advantage of 3D printing, the upper and lower wings plus the inter-plane struts come as a single part, So it is automatically correctly aligned.

 

When the transparencies are done, the kit will appear at Hannants.

  • Like 5
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 months later...

Has the Blackburn Blackburn been finished?  Just looked at Hannants but no trace.  Just being curious!!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

This is very well timed - we plan on delivering the de Havilland No.1 (72 & 48) to Hannants next week, and the Blackburn at the end of July.

 

3D printing transparencies is a tricky process, but we are getting reasonable results now. Although we will do the usual 72 & 48, I am mulling over a 1:32 version - any thoughts, anyone?

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Indeed they have, John! The Blackburn Blackburn - My Precious! Mr. Gaunt - please do this in 1/32 scale also - let the General* know that I, as a Soviet Marshal, command him to do so!

 

Best Regards,

 

Jason

 

* Speaking of which, where is the blackguard, he should be on this thread. Calling @general melchett!

Edited by Learstang
Additional comments added.
  • Haha 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 minutes ago, tnuag said:

So be it.

 

Excellent (I say in my best Mr. Burns voice, tenting my fingers)!

 

Best Regards,

 

Jason

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 weeks later...

As a quick update, production of kits starts next week (12 July 2021), and I have agreed with Hannants that it will be in 1:72, 1:48 and 1:32.

 

The idea of doing the upper and lower wings plus inter-plane struts as a single part gives a strong, perfectly aligned structure with far fewer parts. The downside is that when you first see a 3D printed assembly, is is rather daunting.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hot diggety-dog! A Blackburnx2 in all three scales! All Praise Be to Nodens, Lord of the Outer Abyss! Now Neil, when you say the printed assembly is rather daunting, how much finishing shall be needed on the parts? I'm referring to removing the artefacts of 3-D printing, such as layering.

 

Best Regards,

 

Jason

  • Haha 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

5 hours ago, Learstang said:

Hot diggety-dog! A Blackburnx2 in all three scales! All Praise Be to Nodens, Lord of the Outer Abyss! Now Neil, when you say the printed assembly is rather daunting, how much finishing shall be needed on the parts? I'm referring to removing the artefacts of 3-D printing, such as layering.

 

Best Regards,

 

Jason

The stars are right....................

 

Paul.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well Jason, I presume the layering you refer to is the steps or layers you get with FDM (Fused Deposition Modeling) printing (i.e. the machine extrudes hot filament which bonds to the previous layer). You don't get that with MSLA (Masked Stereo Lithography) printing but you do have a large number of supports, to ensure that the parts are accurate and without sag between supports. The layers are thinner in MSLA, going down to 10 microns if required.

 

The first sight of the forest of supports can be daunting. I have given Hannants some photos of the DH No.1 to illustrate this. See https://www.hannants.co.uk/product/HW-48003?result-token=sJ5rf

 

In the instructions I wrote "LOOK MANY TIMES, CUT ONCE".

 

I hope this clarifies things.

  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yes, Neil, thank you! That does clarify things, and I was thinking of the sort of layers I get when I use my old 3-D printer (which uses FDM). I should have known that the equipment you use is much more sophisticated.

 

Best Regards,

 

Jason

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

It was the arrival of low cost MSLA machines, particularly the Elegoo and Phrozen machines which swung me onto 3D printing, Jason.

 

I have had SLA masters produced for around 10 years but they are expensive. Domestic MSLA reduce costs by a huge amount and we all benefit.

 

As I have said before, the current style of 3D printing is in my opinion the biggest advance in modelling in decades.

Edited by tnuag
  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 5 weeks later...
Posted (edited)

Here are some photos of the test model Blackburn in 1:72. The first batch will be delivered to Hannants, in the next few days, to be followed by the 1:48 version as time permits.

 

Unfortunately the 1:32 version will have to wait until we get a larger printer, and as that is a significant capital investment, I cannot say when that will happen - sorry to the 1:32 modellers.

 

The main disadvantage of 3D printing is that it takes a long time to remove all the nubs from the supports, to achieve a smooth finish (especially on struts).

 

The advantages are that you can model undercuts and incredibly fine details easily. Plus very simple construction for biplanes - the Blackburn only has six major parts; = left fuselage half, right fuselage half, cabin interior, left wings and struts, right wings and struts and the empennage/tail unit. Plus minor parts like wheels, seats, propeller, etc.

 

To me, the biggest single advantage is that the wings and struts are a single part, giving strength combined with perfect alignment (no more jigs to align wings and struts).

 

Anyway, here are some photos.

 

spacer.png

 

spacer.png

 

Alternative radiator shutters (open & closed) are supplied.

The windscreen frame requires glazing solution - I feel that this is easier and more realistic than painting the frame on a transparency.

 

spacer.png

 

 

spacer.png

 

 

 

Edited by tnuag
formatting
  • Like 9
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

The 1:72 version was delivered to Hannants yesterday. Production has been disrupted by personnel problems and there will be some slight delay before the 1;48 version appears.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 8/20/2021 at 7:09 PM, Iain Ogilvie said:

Looks great!

 

I'd be seriously tempted by one in 1:32 - perhaps FDM print using HIPS (with details resin printed) in 1:32?

 

Iain

It isn't likely - it would mean a complete redesign, sadly.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...