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Just now, John Thompson said:

A new, more simply engineered kit would probably revive the market just for those reasons alone.

 

I'm sorry, but no one is going to invest a large sum in the hope that maybe the market will revive interest in the subject.

 

Companies producing models from metal moulds, especially steel ones (like IBG), are looking at potential sales, because their investment is much higher than for short-run companies producing models from resin or galvanised moulds.

 

From the point of view of these companies:

  • Soviet aircraft sell worse than Allied or German aircraft.
  • Interwar/early war planes sell worse than those from the middle or end of the war.
  • Planes used in little-known battles sell worse than those that took part in famous battles.

When you consider that Amodel and ICM kits are present in this niche market, it makes no sense to enter it. Perhaps some short-run company will do it, but as I mentioned earlier, there are lower mould production costs there.

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1 hour ago, Piotr Mikolajski said:

 

I'm sorry, but no one is going to invest a large sum in the hope that maybe the market will revive interest in the subject.

 

Companies producing models from metal moulds, especially steel ones (like IBG), are looking at potential sales, because their investment is much higher than for short-run companies producing models from resin or galvanised moulds.

 

From the point of view of these companies:

  • Soviet aircraft sell worse than Allied or German aircraft.
  • Interwar/early war planes sell worse than those from the middle or end of the war.
  • Planes used in little-known battles sell worse than those that took part in famous battles.

When you consider that Amodel and ICM kits are present in this niche market, it makes no sense to enter it. Perhaps some short-run company will do it, but as I mentioned earlier, there are lower mould production costs there.

 

You're probably right, but I do have it on good authority that someone is doing groundwork for a new 1/72 I-16, possibly a type 10. Beyond that, I don't know any more. In light of your well-reasoned comments, will the kit ever be released? Time will tell...

 

And anyway, I was only doing a bit of wish-listing - I don't expect IBG to call me up to act as their market research department. That could be fatal - their next three releases would be the ones Wulfman suggested!

 

John

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Posted (edited)

I know personally people from IBG market research department and I know what are these secret items.

53 minutes ago, John Thompson said:

I don't expect IBG to call me up to act as their market research department. That could be fatal - their next three releases would be the ones Wulfman suggested!

 

To be honest, both Lavochkin fighters are in the same category as the I-16. If someone does release them, it will either be a resin kit (Prop&Jet company with its high quality would be good) or a short run - MikroMir released a kit in 1/48, maybe they will downsize it to 1/72.

 

The Yak-7 / Yak-9 family is a much bigger problem. There are several different fuselages here, the design taking into account most of the versions is complicated and will not be cheap. I myself would like it to be published by a company that can design this type of kit series, that cares about the differences between versions and that can do it at a contemporary quality level worthy of our money. And I would throw that money at them, because the Polish Air Force used several versions and I would like to have them all.

 

However, I am afraid that it will be done by some company which will mix up the versions and will proclaim to everyone that this is how it should be. Alternatively, it will only do the model right, but only one version and it will not want to do the others. In this way, it will ruin the subject, because then for sure no one else will want to do it.

Edited by Piotr Mikolajski
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"From the point of view of these companies:

Soviet aircraft sell worse than Allied or German aircraft.

Interwar/early war planes sell worse than those from the middle or end of the war.

Planes used in little-known battles sell worse than those that took part in famous battles."

 

I agreed with you even if following these points is not explicable why so many PZL11 and 23 boxes, or worse PZL37 kits in the IBG Catalogue. These items are of course of interest for an internal polish market, outside Poland the interest is really low, one of the lowest. I can see the pile of unsold PZL in italian shops for instance ... so I can conclude that in your apparently logical theory there s something doen't work a bit. If IBG had a catalogue of BF 109E, Spitfire, Hurrycanes, etc ... it's not. 

 

I hope IBG leaves the polish subjets now, no more PZL please, what we have is enough, is over enough. ... please, concentrate in a family of Curtiss/P40, in the highest quality, or P51 ( starting from a P51- Allison powered... ) and why not Spitfire, Tempest, Typhoon ... all these temas have the possibility for polish squadron insigna, even under RAF main insignas ... 

Edited by gioca
explain better my opinion
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Given the level of attention IBG pay to accuracy with their British 1/72 trucks, the chance of them doing any of the subjects you mention to a higher standard than those already available in 1970 appears small.  No doubt the kits will have many more pieces...

 

Frankly, if anyone would do a Yak 9 variant to modern quality and accuracy I wouldn't care if it could only make one of its variants - it actually is not all that difficult to convert one to another, although perhaps forward and aft cockpits would be nice: oh dear, alternative fuselage pieces from a single tooling...  Just how different is this from the number of alternative shapes for a Spitfire?  Or even a Spitfire Mk.V, if you want to be more specific.  Or even a Mk.Vc.  Yes, I know Spitfires sell well, and many of the buyers don't know or care about the differences between different Mk.Vcs.  Why should the market, outside of a handful here (and not many of those), care about different sub-variants of the Yak.9?  It is after all a pretty well-known fighter, certainly compared to the fairly well known P-11 or (much less) Karas?  Both of these aircraft have been tooled for mass markets, if some time ago, and in the case of the P-11 several times by different companies.  Somebody must be buying them outside of Poland. 

 

If you want to argue that the modern mass market is generally less well-informed and less adventurous than previously I will have some sympathy with you.  WW2 is after all a long time ago now.  Yet at the same time the market is much more geographically spread and there is a taste for the "exotic" that can find niche markets making types available to all (though you may need to grab them when you see them).  So you can get a Polish company making Polish aircraft that no-one else will touch, a French/Romanian company making Romanian subjects, with Italian subjects from Italeri, Japanese ones from Hasegawa and others.  The modelling world is large enough to cope with manufacturers who do not restrict themselves to mass sales.

 

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Lots of good input and common sense here - I hardly know where to start with a reply! I would only say, regarding my favourite hobbyhorse, the Yak-9, that we've already had two manufacturers (Dakoplast and ICM/Encore) do 1/72 kits with fuselages for both the Yak-9D and Yak-9T (ICM even gave you both in one box), so anyone risking it all on a brand-new kit has a couple of examples to follow, even if the ICM one is crude. If all else fails, a reissue of the Dako kits would be much better than nothing; however, I really think a new kit could be made to appeal to the Average Modelbuilder, simply because VVS aircraft of the GPW had so many colourful markings options. The green/black and grey/grey camouflage schemes are eye-catching, too!

 

John

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If a Yak1M sells good, I can imagine that the same performance is in the possibility of a good Yak 9 ( I want to limit all to the main D version ).  I follow from years the personal "J.Thompson Battle" for a new Yak 9 family, a new kit would be more than welcome also by me, of course, and I'm surprised that main Est companies from Russia and Ucrainia seem to ignore this type ( I mean the main brands, Amodel has done its part in the battle!).  It's incredible that the type is apparently ignored in any scale despite its history and its performance during WWII. The last operative version, Yak 9U, so well performed that I read the order for the luftwaffe gruppe was to avoid and escape by the involvement in air combat with Yak 9 U equipped formations ! May be only a mith ? May be, anyway in such a way the Yak 9 is still ignored by the main brands seems to be out of any logical human comprehension! Airfix in the 70 had a kit, one of the first produced kit of the type and one of the first items in the Airfix catalogue ... at that time the new projects offices studying the history deeper  than today ? 😉 Of course a certain part in this story is the not so spread high numbers of images and pictures of Yak 9 available, making a simple search on web, give poor results. Mainly the same images. Does it depend on this ? mah ... hard to Know. 

 

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I think that IBG will base there manufacturing decisions on what their home market wants. That home market is Poland and Poles aboard.

 

Any UK sales are their bonus.

 

If you look at what they have produced it is stuff used by the Poles at the start of World War 2 or by Polish Division raised to fight in the British Army. 

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Slight qualification: don't they also produce Hungarian tanks?  And more than a few from other nations?  They have stayed fixed to the Polish 1939 theme for their aircraft, but are much more varied with the vehicles.

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4 hours ago, gioca said:

I agreed with you even if following these points is not explicable why so many PZL11 and 23 boxes, or worse PZL37 kits in the IBG Catalogue.

 

The answer to this question is very simple - IBG designs whole families, not individual versions.

 

If you invest in a team that analyses documents and photos, the result is a lot of knowledge about the whole design. At that point, you know what you can do with that knowledge, so it pays to invest a little more and design a whole family of aircraft, not just one version.

 

Modern technology allows us to design a model in many versions in such a way that it will have as many common elements as possible, but at the same time will not require advanced modifications to make each of these versions.

 

The PZL.37 Łoś is a very good example here. The previous model (from 1982) did not include many details and differences between versions, because it was based on information from the 1970s. To make a version with a single vertical stabilizer, you had to cut the tail and putty the joint.

 

By designing this model from scratch you could do exactly the same thing. But from the perspective of making life easier for modellers, taking into account the differences between versions and increasing the sales of the model, it made more sense to do three fuselages:

  • for the version A (with a single stabiliser)
  • for the early version B (without a window in the fuselage)
  • for the late version B (with a window in the fuselage)

Similarly, we have different variants of radiators or different variants of rudders. This makes it possible to make several boxes instead of one, so each modeller can choose his own version and paint scheme.

 

There are also differences of this type in the PZL.23 kit, although they are not so visible. But in the P.11 family the differences between the versions are considerable - they are different wings and different engines. That is why there are so many boxes - they are only seemingly "the same", but the differences between them are really significant.

 

  

4 hours ago, gioca said:

These items are of course of interest for an internal polish market, outside Poland the interest is really low, one of the lowest.

 

On the contrary. I cannot disclose specific figures, but these models are selling very well outside Poland. Some buyers want the first Allied fighters or bombers of WWII, but others want interesting camouflage schemes, like Romanian ones. Because the models were designed with different versions in mind, both groups of buyers get what they are looking for.

  

4 hours ago, gioca said:

I can see the pile of unsold PZL in italian shops for instance ... so I can conclude that in your apparently logical theory there s something doen't work a bit.

 

A pile of models does not at all prove that they do not sell. People often come to my local shop and say that "nothing sells and there is always the same thing on the shelves". Meanwhile, models do sell, and the owner puts another box in place of the sold ones.

 

Anyway, looking at sales in one shop does not really make sense. Two years ago Hobby 2000 released a reboxed Beaufighter from Hasegawa. It was a great deal because there was a full set of frames inside, so you could probably do any version.

 

The model sold very quickly, but in one shop it didn't sell at all. The price was the same as in other shops, but in this one the model did not sell. Why? Nobody knows the answer. These models could be bought there until recently, two years after their release, although they were not available anywhere. The demand for them was so great that Hobby 2000 reboxed them once again.

  

4 hours ago, gioca said:

please, concentrate in a family of Curtiss/P40

 

 Special Hobby has been releasing the entire P-40 family since 2017. I don't know if there is room for another manufacturer here, but it certainly doesn't make economic sense, SH kits are very good ones.

 

4 hours ago, gioca said:

or P51 ( starting from a P51- Allison powered... )

 

Eduard released excellent P-51D/K in 1/48 and they are working on the earlier variants too. Both are planned to be downsized to 1/72, so I myself will wait for the release of their models, even if it is in a few years.

  

4 hours ago, gioca said:

Tempest, Typhoon ... all these temas have the possibility for polish squadron insigna, even under RAF main insignas ...

 

Tempests and Typhoons were not used by Polish squadrons. And well, IIRC Eduard and Special Hobby announced downsizing their common Tempest, so I'll wait for these kits too.

 

1 hour ago, gioca said:

It's incredible that the type is apparently ignored in any scale despite its history and its performance during WWII.

 

Yak-7/Yak-9 are not ignored. It's just that each company has exactly the same problems with this design. If the fuselage and wings, the two most expensive parts, were not changing, models of the whole family would have been available in 1/72, 1/48 and 1/32 long ago.

 

As the fuselages and wings change, it raises the price of the whole project. At the same time, nobody wants to release just one version, because it doesn't make sense economically - it won't sell as well, so the return on investment will be much longer.

 

Releasing one version costs X, but the profit from selling it is Y.
Releasing a whole family of versions costs X+20%, but the profit from selling them is Y+200% or more.

 

54 minutes ago, Cyberduck said:

I think that IBG will base there manufacturing decisions on what their home market wants. That home market is Poland and Poles aboard.

 

Nope. Designing and releasing models are not charity. IBG, like any sensible company, is driven by return on investment and subsequent profit. That is why families of aircraft were released whose kits were old and did not include most versions.

 

The home market demands kits of prototypes of Polish aircraft and tanks from the late 1930s. None of this makes sense, because the cost of designing and producing moulds is the same as for another vehicle or aircraft of similar size, but the difference is in the profits.

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2 hours ago, Piotr Mikolajski said:

IBG designs whole families, not individual versions.

 

If you invest in a team that analyses documents and photos, the result is a lot of knowledge about the whole design. At that point, you know what you can do with that knowledge, so it pays to invest a little more and design a whole family of aircraft, not just one version.

 

Modern technology allows us to design a model in many versions in such a way that it will have as many common elements as possible, but at the same time will not require advanced modifications to make each of these versions.

 

So a family of Yak-9s (and maybe I should be clear that I mean the Yak-9s with the VK-105 engine, not the Yak-9U and Yak-9P with the VK-107) makes sense.

 

 

2 hours ago, Piotr Mikolajski said:

The PZL.37 Łoś is a very good example here. The previous model (from 1982) did not include many details and differences between versions, because it was based on information from the 1970s. To make a version with a single vertical stabilizer, you had to cut the tail and putty the joint.

 

By designing this model from scratch you could do exactly the same thing. But from the perspective of making life easier for modellers, taking into account the differences between versions and increasing the sales of the model, it made more sense to do three fuselages:

  • for the version A (with a single stabiliser)
  • for the early version B (without a window in the fuselage)
  • for the late version B (with a window in the fuselage)

Similarly, we have different variants of radiators or different variants of rudders. This makes it possible to make several boxes instead of one, so each modeller can choose his own version and paint scheme.

 

Soooo... in the case of the PZL.37, three fuselages is okay, even if two of them differ only by the presence or absence of a window?

 

 

2 hours ago, Piotr Mikolajski said:

Yak-7/Yak-9 are not ignored. It's just that each company has exactly the same problems with this design. If the fuselage and wings, the two most expensive parts, were not changing, models of the whole family would have been available in 1/72, 1/48 and 1/32 long ago.

 

As the fuselages and wings change, it raises the price of the whole project. At the same time, nobody wants to release just one version, because it doesn't make sense economically - it won't sell as well, so the return on investment will be much longer.

 

Releasing one version costs X, but the profit from selling it is Y.
Releasing a whole family of versions costs X+20%, but the profit from selling them is Y+200% or more.

 

Again, forget the Yak-9U and Yak-9P - new kits would be nice, but Amodel has done these, even if the wings are almost 3 mm too far forward. To cover the VK-105 series airframes, two fuselages are needed - the original Yak-9/Yak-9D, and the Yak-9T/Yak-9M/Yak-9K, with the cockpit moved rearward by 400 mm. Even a better situation than the PZL.37! And the minor difference in wingtip shape can be covered by making the wingtips separate parts, or even just by providing guidance on how to reshape them.

 

So, a Yak-9/VK-105 series really does make sense. Hey, is that what those secret future releases are?! You sly devil - you've been arguing against the Yak-9 just to put us off the scent, haven't you!

 

John

 

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1 minute ago, John Thompson said:

So a family of Yak-9s (and maybe I should be clear that I mean the Yak-9s with the VK-105 engine, not the Yak-9U and Yak-9P with the VK-107) makes sense.

 

 The point is that you are only talking about part of the whole family. Meanwhile, from a design perspective, you have to look at the whole Yak-7/Yak-9 family. Seriously, a responsible company will not want to ruin the subject by releasing only 2-3 versions. And coming back to the topic in a few years and releasing more variants is much more expensive than doing everything at once - you have to pay again for the designer's work, for the analysts' work and so on.

 

1 minute ago, John Thompson said:

Soooo... in the case of the PZL.37, three fuselages is okay, even if two of them differ only by the presence or absence of a window?

 

These kinds of decisions always depend on the individual case. In the case of the PZL.37 you have the same wings all the time, so making an extra fuselage with a window doesn't raise the cost that much, and allows you to release more boxes, including those with aircraft rebuilt just before the war broke out. 

  

1 minute ago, John Thompson said:

Again, forget the Yak-9U and Yak-9P - new kits would be nice, but Amodel has done these, even if the wings are almost 3 mm too far forward.

 

And here we have the difference between modeller thinking and business thinking. The Yak-9P is from a sales perspective one of the more important versions, because it was used in large numbers after the war by many countries (Albania, Bulgaria, China, Hungary, North Korea, Poland, Soviet Union, USA and Yugoslavia) and this version is the basis for the economic success of the project. This is especially important for types that are not obvious bestsellers, such as the Spitfire or Messerschmitt.

 

1 minute ago, John Thompson said:

Even a better situation than the PZL.37! And the minor difference in wingtip shape can be covered by making the wingtips separate parts, or even just by providing guidance on how to reshape them.

 

Since I don't remember all the differences between the Yak-9 versions, it's hard for me to say how it can be solved in this case. But speaking in general - it is not always possible to make the wingtips alone, a lot depends on the design, technological issues come into play and so on.

 

Nowadays models are designed in such a way that modeller could make them straight from the box. Tips on how to change something on your own are rather a domain of short-run kits. Larger manufacturers use such things very rarely indeed, rather when it is a matter of something very simple, to be done with basic tools in a few seconds. If I remember correctly, Eduard in Spitfire 1/48 shows to make an extra line (nothing substantial) for some specific aircraft and that's the only such case in mainstream models from the last years that I remember.

  

1 minute ago, John Thompson said:

So, a Yak-9/VK-105 series really does make sense.

 

As you can see, the point of releasing such a limited part of the family is not that obvious at all, the cost-effectiveness too. And this is the explanation why the Yak-7/Yak-9 family is only available as a short-run.

  

1 minute ago, John Thompson said:

Hey, is that what those secret future releases are?

 

Nope.

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38 minutes ago, Piotr Mikolajski said:

 

 Seriously, a responsible company will not want to ruin the subject by releasing only 2-3 versions.

 

The Yak-9P is from a sales perspective one of the more important versions, because it was used in large numbers after the war by many countries (Albania, Bulgaria, China, Hungary, North Korea, Poland, Soviet Union, USA and Yugoslavia) and this version is the basis for the economic success of the project. 

 

Thank you for your detailed responses.  However, there are a couple of points that I found odd.

 

Are you suggesting that companies such as Airfix, Revell and Tamiya are not responsible companies?  These commonly produce models that are very specific to one version only.  Less so than they did, undoubtedly, but it still happens.  P-40C, Hurricane Mk.I, Zero A6M2, P-51D, Beaufighter, Mosquito...  Any many more companies/subjects where different boxings have only minor differences to the toolings.

 

It would be nice (to marketeers at least) to think that the markets in Albania, Bulgaria and North Korea were large enough to drive variant choice, and good for modellers were it to result in more exotic types appearing.  However postwar variants of wartime types are not great sellers, and the numbers used pale into insignificance compared to the wartime use.   This is particularly true for the Yak.9, though I grant you that this may not offer as wide a choice of national markings or colour schemes.  Though there are a wide range of large and colourful personal markings.  

 

I would also suggest that the variation between the Allison P-51s and the Merlin ones may be rather more than you or indeed Eduard realise, and the differences between Allison-engined Mustangs more so.  I have considerable doubts about the appearance of Allison Mustangs as part of Eduard's P-51 range.  As you rightly say, changing the wings and the fuselages drive up the complexity: although they will have to do both for the B/C and the D/K, this is a minor change compared to the fuselage(s) of the Allison types.  The two are best regarded as different aircraft.  However, there is at least one decent widely-available kit of an Allison variant (Academy) which is more than can be said for the much more prolific and important Yak.9.

 

 

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that's right. Assuming all the points by our polish friend are good, IBG can not produce  or is not convenient it produces( because Eduard or SpecialHobby or ArmaHobby or other brand competition) che following: Tempest Family ( SpecialHobby and Eduard have interest in it and no polish/RAF squadron ), P40 Family ( SpecialHobby has a recent family of good quality - even if the P40 and B/C versions are out of the family and Airfix is not so good and easily outclassed ), Typhoon Family (because no polish squadron flew it), P51 ( because Eduard promised B/C and D/K in a not so distant future - about 2023/24 - it is not sure the Allison versions will be coverd, anyway ... and also ArmaHobby announced a P51B/C ),  109 anyversion ( because Eduard and SpecialHobby ), Fw 190 ( because Eduard), Hurrycane ( because the recent ArmaHobbyFamily), I16 (because ICM and the russian subjects are a bad investment), Yak 9 ( too complicated for too many versions and differences and russian subject ) ... all these types are excluded ... so it seems IBG has little alternative for a next good investment and kit with really god business potential ... it's not so and it is not so because IBG makes business and in the business is possible to find competitors with your same articles. Two years ago ArmaHobby did the Hurricane despite the Revell and Hasegawa kits, and also the recent Hobby2000 reboxes ... Arma makes a good and better kit in comparison with the other brands. So IBG now need to leave making polish fighter with no hope of good performances in the business and make a type that also in presence of competitors is better, because IBG is in the business and making business is fighting. So with classic subjects , another classic is the Spitfire MkVb and c versions, IBG can have  really good opportunities to make money ... Eduard will realise its early Merlin Spitfires from the 2023 ... so there's the time to sold a lot of kits before a competitor arrives. So for other classic items. It's business, it's a risky opportunities for invest money, but it cannot be pretend there's no risk at all in a market without competition ! 

At the moment it seems that the "classic WWII" items with sure potential are all covered ( I could also put in the classic group Stuka, BF 110, Beaufighter, Mosquito ... may be P38 and P39 is out of the count, but are nor used by polish ( may be P39 ).     

Considering my wish, I hope the following news: Allison P51 family, Curtiss Hwak 75 / P40 and P40B/C family, Macchi 200/202/205 Family . 

Allison P51 is not well coverd at the moment, an accurate kit is needed.

The same for the Hawk 75/P36/early P40, Airfix recent issue is not so good details, there a lot of space for improvements.

About the Macchi C 200 /202/205 family ... the first subject, macchi C200,  is covered badly by a recent HobbyBoss easy line kit, AML made also a kit not exaclty so easy to build, a real short run.  Macchi C 202 is covered by Hasegawa and than Italeri ( this is a kind of clone of the Hasegawa ones, with worse details in some area and better rendition only of the undercarriage) but Hasegawa kit has a lot of problems of shape and proportion, so it is for the 205 that descends from the C 202. So this italian family of fighter could be a nice and interesting options from the business point of view. Italian Macchis are nice shape aircraft, with attractive and different camouflage, IBG could think to these ... as IBG  thinks in 35 scale to some italian items ( and we hope it's only a beginning ). 

We'll see the surprices sooner or later ... I hope for something really international and not so strictly polish in the future. Let's cross our fingers.

Ciao

 

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2 hours ago, gioca said:

Assuming all the points (...)

 

As I wrote earlier to someone who tried to guess if one of the secret items in 1/32 is PZL.23 Karaś - such guessing is pointless. I know what test sprues have just arrived, I know what the secret items and production plans are, but I take NDA very seriously, so I won't comment on that.

 

What I write about in this thread should be treated in general terms, remembering that it concerns the production of kits from steel moulds. Aluminium, galvanised or resin moulds are a separate topic.

 

This is why I can write that the Polish market does not dictate the choice of subjects, because the Polish market would like models of PZInż.130 or 10TP tanks, or PZL.44 Wicher or PZL.46 Sum aircraft, which IBG will not make, because it is completely unprofitable. The lack of profitability of such ideas is no secret; anyone who can count to ten should be aware of this.

 

Last but not least - virtually every thriving mainstream company now makes announcements of popular themes at a time when, in fact, the model is ready and production can be started quickly. It is no coincidence that some companies make identical announcements just after someone else has announced a new model. And believe me, in the industry nobody likes such situations or such companies.

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Interesting - no comment on my comment on Breguet XIX. I am in a minority who like the its short run by Hit-Kit, but definitely a new kit is needed. It is a very important machine for both Poland and world-wide history of aviation, still not present on the market as modern injection kit... And many variants possible - at least five engine types, different wings and if you will include the Bidon and Super Bidon long range experimental machine there is a plenty of boxes in spe...

Regards

J-W

 

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On 5/1/2021 at 8:46 PM, Piotr Mikolajski said:

From the point of view of these companies:

  • Soviet aircraft sell worse than Allied or German aircraft.
  • Interwar/early war planes sell worse than those from the middle or end of the war.
  • Planes used in little-known battles sell worse than those that took part in famous battles.

Off topic but I ask for your collective forgiveness: @Piotr Mikolajski, since you're both knowledgeable and informed, how do you explain, by your own logic above, the business model of Clear Prop, for example, that seems to thrive on obscure subjects, while doing them to the highest standards the hobby has seen? Mind, I'm happy they do, since some of those subjects are close to my heart, but apparently it defies logic.

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3 minutes ago, Fukuryu said:

Mind, I'm happy they do, since some of those subjects are close to my heart, but apparently it defies logic.

 

The answer is quite simple - different technology than steel moulds. I heard some info about it but I have no full and reliable data. From what I have heard, and here I put the emphasis on *heard*, because this is not the first-hand information, this technology makes it possible to create very high quality moulds at a lower cost, but at the same time the life of these moulds is much shorter. We can call their kits HTSR - Hi-Tech Short-Run.

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2 minutes ago, Piotr Mikolajski said:

 

The answer is quite simple - different technology than steel moulds. I heard some info about it but I have no full and reliable data. From what I have heard, and here I put the emphasis on *heard*, because this is not the first-hand information, this technology makes it possible to create very high quality moulds at a lower cost, but at the same time the life of these moulds is much shorter. We can call their kits HTSR - Hi-Tech Short-Run.

 

Thank you very much, Piotr, indeed it makes sense. Let's hope that technology spreads and get us all those Yak-9 we want! 

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In contrast to the mainstream of posts here, I am very glad about IBG's choice of subjects and I don't want it to change. After all who other than Polish companies like IBG and Arma would provide us with modern toolings of Polish subjects? There is no reason why each company should only try to make its own interpretation of handful of the most wanted subjects. Therefore I strongly endorse everything Piotr wrote here.

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On 02/05/2021 at 15:43, Piotr Mikolajski said:

 

The answer to this question is very simple - IBG designs whole families, not individual versions.

 

If you invest in a team that analyses documents and photos, the result is a lot of knowledge about the whole design. At that point, you know what you can do with that knowledge, so it pays to invest a little more and design a whole family of aircraft, not just one version.

 

Modern technology allows us to design a model in many versions in such a way that it will have as many common elements as possible, but at the same time will not require advanced modifications to make each of these versions.

 

 

I am sitting here thinking, "At last - a family of day-fighter Sabres!" XP-86; F-86A-1; F-86A-5/6/7; Canadair Sabre 1; F-86E-1/5; Canadair Sabre 2; F-86E-15/F-86F (early version). All with narrow-chord wings, all with lovely slats, vee- and rounded windshields and none ever done in any scale with accuracy or delicacy as the end product. And also a VERY popular, long-awaited subject. In 1/72 and 1/48. Oh go on - an F-86A in 1/32 as well then :)

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