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Absolutely fantastic result.

I also thought the first photo’s were of the real aircraft for a prelude to the turned out model.

:goodjob::clap2:

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3 hours ago, Brigbeale said:

Absolutely fantastic result.

I also thought the first photo’s were of the real aircraft for a prelude to the turned out model.

:goodjob::clap2:

Thanks! That backdrop makes a huge difference 👍

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1 hour ago, Team Aer Lingus said:

Simply stunning beautiful model and the background is fantastic well done 

 

thanks for sharing

 

Eamonn

Thank you very much Eamonn

22 minutes ago, Homer said:

Beautiful model well done 👏 

Thank you!

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Excellent model and also presentation/pictures.

Simply great

Would be nice to see some more images, this model deserve that :)

Regards Djordje

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Great subject and execution. The effect is highly convincing, and that's what modelling`s about, isn't it ......... oh, and having fun!

Congratulations on a super build.

Q

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That's beautiful work, first class job

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On 08/02/2021 at 10:28, Dr. Quack said:

Great subject and execution. The effect is highly convincing, and that's what modelling`s about, isn't it ......... oh, and having fun!

Congratulations on a super build.

Q

Thank you, that’s so true - my builds aren’t perfect but it’s an enjoyable way to pass the time (and good practise for

my photography too!)

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  • 1 month later...

A stunning Tornado, and diorama, Shearwater. Looks perfect to me!

 

Can I ask a specific question, please - I am building the Italeri 1:72 Operation Granby Tornado GR.1 with all the well-documented problems, which are NOT easy for a newbie. A great challenge for me to practice new skills at filling and sanding etc (difficult fuselage halves fit). I congratulated myself for (I thought!) successfully attaching the underwing pylons so they can swivel to reflect different swing-wing angles, but then promptly broke one off, so have opted to do the model with wings glued fully forward. My question is - from your photos (which are superb in their quality, BTW, doing justice to your masterpiece) it seems you didn't worry about trying to do anything to fill in/detail the open slits behind the wings. Did you consider doing anything there? It looks very stark in my unpainted early assembly, but in your photos it really isn't noticeable.

 

I can't find decent photos online of the real Tornado, showing the anatomy behind forward-swept wings - any solutions here, especially on larger-scale models?

 

 

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1 hour ago, Charles H said:

A stunning Tornado, and diorama, Shearwater. Looks perfect to me!

 

Can I ask a specific question, please - I am building the Italeri 1:72 Operation Granby Tornado GR.1 with all the well-documented problems, which are NOT easy for a newbie. A great challenge for me to practice new skills at filling and sanding etc (difficult fuselage halves fit). I congratulated myself for (I thought!) successfully attaching the underwing pylons so they can swivel to reflect different swing-wing angles, but then promptly broke one off, so have opted to do the model with wings glued fully forward. My question is - from your photos (which are superb in their quality, BTW, doing justice to your masterpiece) it seems you didn't worry about trying to do anything to fill in/detail the open slits behind the wings. Did you consider doing anything there? It looks very stark in my unpainted early assembly, but in your photos it really isn't noticeable.

 

I can't find decent photos online of the real Tornado, showing the anatomy behind forward-swept wings - any solutions here, especially on larger-scale models?

 

 

Hi, thank you very much for the comments! I also snapped one of the pylon mounting pins - clean break, flush with the wing surface, but as the stub of pin remained in place, I took a chance and glued the pylon on to it (fully expecting the glue to run & lock everything up). To my surprise it worked again! (Although the wings look better forwards anyway IMHO). 
I did wonder about some sort of wing glove, but just wasn’t that bothered in the end. The darker painted rectangle around it blends it in a little anyway.


I found a few shots of the real one by googling “tornado wing seal”, but not sure if they give enough detail for you.

 

Or... easiest & neatest option, I suspect, is the 1/72 wing seal accessory sold by Air-Graphics Models for either Hasegawa or Revell kits. Might need adjusting for Italeri, and I haven’t seen them first hand, but will probably pick a set up for my next Tornado build.

 

Cheers!

 

 

 

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Lovely work....the hangar looks like the big Hangar at Akrotiri (Cyprus) only seems to be bit more lit up....for such a large building it seems quite dark maybe its relative to mediterranean sunshine 

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2 hours ago, junglierating said:

Lovely work....the hangar looks like the big Hangar at Akrotiri (Cyprus) only seems to be bit more lit up....for such a large building it seems quite dark maybe its relative to mediterranean sunshine 

Thank you kindly! I’d tweaked the colour temperature on these, and highlighted the wall area with torchlight, in order to get the feel of the orange sodium lights in older hangars, with sunlight through the window/door. Not sure I’ll end up as a Hollywood CGI expert but it kind of worked!

 

I can’t repost the shots here (can’t access Flickr atm) but my latest - the two seat Harrier T.10, just posted - features the same hangar but with cooler light, giving a more modern, fluorescent feel. I hope. 

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On 3/21/2021 at 7:51 PM, The Shearwater said:

Hi, thank you very much for the comments! I also snapped one of the pylon mounting pins - clean break, flush with the wing surface, but as the stub of pin remained in place, I took a chance and glued the pylon on to it (fully expecting the glue to run & lock everything up). To my surprise it worked again! (Although the wings look better forwards anyway IMHO). 
I did wonder about some sort of wing glove, but just wasn’t that bothered in the end. The darker painted rectangle around it blends it in a little anyway.


I found a few shots of the real one by googling “tornado wing seal”, but not sure if they give enough detail for you.

 

Or... easiest & neatest option, I suspect, is the 1/72 wing seal accessory sold by Air-Graphics Models for either Hasegawa or Revell kits. Might need adjusting for Italeri, and I haven’t seen them first hand, but will probably pick a set up for my next Tornado build.

 

Hi The Shearwater

 

If leaving the slit behind the wings alone is good for you, it is certainly good for me! I'll concentrate on developing my filling and sanding (and painting!) skills. Thank you for the googling, though. The words "glove" and "seal" eluded me. I know nothing of after-market kits and accessories, either, so I have a lot to learn! But it's all part of the fun, of course! Attention to detail and obsessiveness are obviously a definitively huge part of modeling. I just have to make sure quest of "perfection" doesn't result in NOTHING being done.

 

You did very well to re-glue the pylons so they still rotate, but that is simply further testament to your skills. Maybe I'll TRY it, but I've glued the wings in the forward position already, and don't really want to free them up again. Actually, the Testors liquid cement I have doesn't seem to be as good as the Revell "Contacta" cement I had for many years. The nozzle constantly has to be reamed out with a needle. I had the Revell bottle for nigh on 30 years (given my very long absence from the hobby), and it always worked superbly. It had a very thin metal nozzle, not a plastic one, and never got blocked. But the seam on the bottle split suddenly, and I was lucky it didn't damage anything!

 

Hobby shops here don't seem to like Revell, and I have not got around to asking why.

 

Anyway, I might make another Tornado kit of a different variant one day, with the winds fully swept! I've (too late) thought of using very tiny magnets to attach the pylons instead, like I've read in FineScale Modeler magazine that people use so they can swap over weapons stores, drop tanks, etc... but I'll file that one away for possible future use.

 

cheers!

 

Charles

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32 minutes ago, Charles H said:

Hi The Shearwater

 

If leaving the slit behind the wings alone is good for you, it is certainly good for me! I'll concentrate on developing my filling and sanding (and painting!) skills. Thank you for the googling, though. The words "glove" and "seal" eluded me. I know nothing of after-market kits and accessories, either, so I have a lot to learn! But it's all part of the fun, of course! Attention to detail and obsessiveness are obviously a definitively huge part of modeling. I just have to make sure quest of "perfection" doesn't result in NOTHING being done.

 

You did very well to re-glue the pylons so they still rotate, but that is simply further testament to your skills. Maybe I'll TRY it, but I've glued the wings in the forward position already, and don't really want to free them up again. Actually, the Testors liquid cement I have doesn't seem to be as good as the Revell "Contacta" cement I had for many years. The nozzle constantly has to be reamed out with a needle. I had the Revell bottle for nigh on 30 years (given my very long absence from the hobby), and it always worked superbly. It had a very thin metal nozzle, not a plastic one, and never got blocked. But the seam on the bottle split suddenly, and I was lucky it didn't damage anything!

 

Hobby shops here don't seem to like Revell, and I have not got around to asking why.

 

Anyway, I might make another Tornado kit of a different variant one day, with the winds fully swept! I've (too late) thought of using very tiny magnets to attach the pylons instead, like I've read in FineScale Modeler magazine that people use so they can swap over weapons stores, drop tanks, etc... but I'll file that one away for possible future use.

 

cheers!

 

Charles

Shame you can’t find Contacta - it’s handy stuff, especially with the thin metal tube. I’ve found the easiest way to clear it is to remove the tube from the glue pot and hold it (with tweezers!) in a flame on the gas stove. The residual glue & blockage burns out in seconds.

Magnets is a good plan, I may try that myself one day.

And you’re right, the important thing is to enjoy the hobby - I’m a long way from perfect but it’s great fun, very relaxing, and challenging enough to keep my interest. And I guess that covers many modellers on this site! 

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I have a piece of household plug wiring (remember when they came with separate plugs and fuses?) stripped down so I can poke one wire into the metal tube of the Contacta to clear it.   I find it works well but can give you rather more than you need for small parts - great for longer/larger joins.

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11 minutes ago, Graham Boak said:

I have a piece of household plug wiring (remember when they came with separate plugs and fuses?) stripped down so I can poke one wire into the metal tube of the Contacta to clear it.   I find it works well but can give you rather more than you need for small parts - great for longer/larger joins.

Good tip! Thanks

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Looks most convincing in every way!

Nice work with the tender vehicle, etc; I love details like that!

👍👍

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5 hours ago, kapam said:

Looks most convincing in every way!

Nice work with the tender vehicle, etc; I love details like that!

👍👍

Thanks, me too - it really adds to the look of a model 👍

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On 3/24/2021 at 9:10 PM, The Shearwater said:

Shame you can’t find Contacta - it’s handy stuff, especially with the thin metal tube. I’ve found the easiest way to clear it is to remove the tube from the glue pot and hold it (with tweezers!) in a flame on the gas stove. The residual glue & blockage burns out in seconds.

Magnets is a good plan, I may try that myself one day.

And you’re right, the important thing is to enjoy the hobby - I’m a long way from perfect but it’s great fun, very relaxing, and challenging enough to keep my interest. And I guess that covers many modellers on this site! 

 

I'm going to go online and get a new Revell Contacta cement. Yes, love that thin metal tube. Pity I can't put my plastic nozzle from my Testors cement bottle in the flame!

 

Now, I listened to the devil, and gave my Tornado's wings a good push... and the Testors glue, true to form, broke contact, and my wings swing again! So, I have to ask - how on earth did you manage to line up the stumps of the broken pylon pin, to re-attach it to the wing... and still allow it to pivot? I am *quite* in awe at that, and don't know if I possess skill enough to do it myself. Did you use CA/superglue, or standard styrene cement? Terribly difficult to exactly align the broken join, or did you treat it as absolutely flush (even sand it a little, to make it so?) and not bother to align the original broken joint, exactly as it was? What I mean is... trying to rotate the stump buried in the underside of the wing with the corresponding stump on the pylon, so they match as originally, if that makes sense(?)

 

Rare earth magnets - I found the following, if it's of any use to anyone:

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SD1kxpy1z5g

 

Finally, please could you (or anyone) direct me to any existing threads (or provide new advice!) about fixing [upper and lower fuselage halves] where there isn't a horizontal gap, but when the halves are misaligned so there is a "high" and "low" edge to the join? I use Tamiya Basic Putty/grey, thinned slightly with Tamiya Lacquer Thinner, to fix horizontal gaps, but how about "vertical" misalignment? Do I sand or scrape the "high" and fill the "low" as a two-way fix to level it so it's flush, or do any other combination of erosion/filling? I have no idea which surface is "wrong" - sorry, I'm simply unsure how to proceed here.

 

cheers!

 

Charles

 

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Absolutely brilliant.  A terrific model and a great setting. 

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