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Covid Jab


DMC

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Got mine coming up on 4th Dec - sadly down to age classification (over 50's.....) The wife is also booked in on that day - she's having hers due to having an immunosuppressant condition. She's been diagnosed since 2008 as having Crohns Disease, which can (in extreme cases) severely suppress  the bodies own ability to fight any infections/diseases and can rely on a cocktail of drugs, and also lead to having parts of the colon/bowel removed. Thankfully she is not that bad, and only has a mild case 🙏, but it still means she is in the section that has her jab early for those under 40 (only just though she turns 40 next year.....)

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Had my booster last week and the following day I had the hot and cold shivers but then I was fine, pretty much the same as when I had my first jab (Oxford)

 

Cheers

 

Dennis

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Had my third one a couple weeks back.  Also been doing the other tests due to going abroad for a week. Crikey, such a palaver filling in forms on line!  Jab passports etc. And having to do a day 2 test after getting back. More stress trying to fill the form for this on line. Talk about making things easy.....not! Anyway all done tested negative on alltests so am now carrying on. Including wearing mask. It was a bit stuffy wearing  it on a 4hour flight each way to the Canaries .

 

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12 minutes ago, RobL said:

 

 

My first Covid jab was painless.  My booster was painless at the time of injection.  My 2nd jab wasn't painless and bled a little.  I think it comes down to the training of the person administering it.  Although what training you need to stab someone with a needle I don't know?!

 

Also had a sore left arm for a day or two after my Pfizer booster last weekend (my first two were AZ).  I'm still here, though.

Having taught student nurses and doctors on the wards and as a lecturer, it is not difficult, but less straightforward than you think. Covid and flu jabs use a fine bore relatively short needle that is designed to go  into the muscle, usually the deltoid in the upper arm. This is a good site as it is easily accessible and has a fair mass so that you are more likely to hit muscle rather than anything else. This is the easiest injection to give so long  as it is done by the book, but there can still be problems. For example, even the most skilled person can it a capillary, causing bleeding as they are invisible. 

Had my booster on 6th November, felt a bit off it the next day so something is working, in any event better than being dead. 

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The initial soreness from the actual injection had disappeared before I had left the hospital. No other effects yet but I am guzzling lots of water and taking Paracetamol regularly. Tomorrow will be the day when things kick off - if indeed they do. When I had jabs one and two I had no side effects at all but that could be because I had Covid-19 prior to having them.

 

Dave

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1 hour ago, Mike said:

Zero point to that post, as that's just boiler-plate trade-marking/trade-secrets, or whatever they're called.  Please be advised that we don't want any politics/baseless conspiracy theory on the forum, so please keep it to yourself.  We're just here to chat about getting the jabs etc.

Baseless conspiracy theory? Not quite.

It involves a lawsuit against the US licencing authority (FDA) and nothing to do with patent law.

However I shall refrain from posting anything vaccine related in future if it is deemed too sensitive here in a Covid thread.

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41 minutes ago, Mr T said:

Having taught student nurses and doctors on the wards and as a lecturer, it is not difficult, but less straightforward than you think. Covid and flu jabs use a fine bore relatively short needle that is designed to go  into the muscle, usually the deltoid in the upper arm. This is a good site as it is easily accessible and has a fair mass so that you are more likely to hit muscle rather than anything else. This is the easiest injection to give so long  as it is done by the book, but there can still be problems. For example, even the most skilled person can it a capillary, causing bleeding as they are invisible. 

Had my booster on 6th November, felt a bit off it the next day so something is working, in any event better than being dead. 

I got my three shots,and I turn my head away so I don't even want a glimpse of the needle,the 2nd of the three hurt the most going in,1 and 3 were almost painless.

 

But why do all the news reports on TV about the shots show a 2" needle going into the arm,that's enough to scare some people !!!

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1 hour ago, Mr T said:

Having taught student nurses and doctors on the wards and as a lecturer, it is not difficult, but less straightforward than you think. Covid and flu jabs use a fine bore relatively short needle that is designed to go  into the muscle, usually the deltoid in the upper arm. This is a good site as it is easily accessible and has a fair mass so that you are more likely to hit muscle rather than anything else. This is the easiest injection to give so long  as it is done by the book, but there can still be problems. For example, even the most skilled person can it a capillary, causing bleeding as they are invisible. 

Had my booster on 6th November, felt a bit off it the next day so something is working, in any event better than being dead. 

I forgot to say that this third jab was the first administered by a nurse. Number 1 was a fireman and number 2 a cellist (just as well she wasn’t a percussionist!)

 

Trevor

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As things haven't moved as fast cross the Channel, I won't be getting my booster until early next year, but I did get my first flu jab in 50 years. Glad to say, no reaction this time. When it does come to my turn to get the booster, if what I've heard, it won't be the AZ vaccine, which means that it won't be at the pharmacy as with the first two, as they have no facility to store at -70c.

 

John.

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41 minutes ago, Max Headroom said:

I forgot to say that this third jab was the first administered by a nurse. Number 1 was a fireman and number 2 a cellist (just as well she wasn’t a percussionist!)

 

Trevor

Sounds like the original line up for YMCA.

 

John.

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1 hour ago, Dogtail2 said:

Baseless conspiracy theory? Not quite.

It involves a lawsuit against the US licencing authority (FDA) and nothing to do with patent law.

However I shall refrain from posting anything vaccine related in future if it is deemed too sensitive here in a Covid thread.

Ooooh ouch! Want to buy a tin helmet and a flak jacket??

 

John.

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55 minutes ago, Max Headroom said:

I forgot to say that this third jab was the first administered by a nurse. Number 1 was a fireman and number 2 a cellist (just as well she wasn’t a percussionist!)

 

Trevor

Please explain, why was a cellist giving you an injection ( another string to her bow i guess ) no seriously have they recruited such like, or did she have previous nursing/medical skills.? Just curious.

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13 minutes ago, sinnerboy said:

Please explain, why was a cellist giving you an injection ( another string to her bow i guess ) no seriously have they recruited such like, or did she have previous nursing/medical skills.? Just curious.

That was her day job (celling??) but she was also a volunteer with St.John’s Ambulance so already had training in giving injections. You realise that in a situation like this there is a wide pool of volunteers that step up to help others on a crisis.

 

Trevor

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OMG we are all so old :lol:

 

SWMBO gets her booster tomorrow & that makes us both triple jabbed PLUS flu jabbed too - all we need now is an asteroid to hit & we can say....

 

WTF did that come from :lol:

 

Good luck everyone - we love you all!!!

Steve

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11 minutes ago, Max Headroom said:

That was her day job (celling??) but she was also a volunteer with St.John’s Ambulance so already had training in giving injections. You realise that in a situation like this there is a wide pool of volunteers that step up to help others on a crisis.

 

Trevor

Ah I see. yes isnt it fantastic that they do?

I have this minds eye of her holding the jab reciepriants the same way as she would a cello 😵

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1 hour ago, BIG X said:

OMG we are all so old :lol:

 

SWMBO gets her booster tomorrow & that makes us both triple jabbed PLUS flu jabbed too - all we need now is an asteroid to hit & we can say....

 

WTF did that come from :lol:

 

I had my booster way back in September due to the medication I have for my rheumatoid arthritis. I have been fortunate enough not to have suffered any side effects from either AZ injections or the Pfizer booster. Mrs N had her booster last Saturday and I had my flu jab then too. 

 

Bring on the asteroids, I'm ready. :lol:

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My nephew, who has no medical experience was taught how to do injections when he worked for one of the mass vaccination centres in London. He was very impressed by how thorough the teaching was. They worked as teams with a nurse or doctor overseeing them. They just had to give the injection, the drawing up of the vaccine was done by a more suitably qualified person. 

Mrs T left home just after seven this morning to spend another Saturday morning at the surgery doing vaccinations along with a GP, the practice manager (who is also a nurse practitioner),  practice nurses and healthcare support workers. She will be doing the same next week etc. She gets paid for doing it, but that's not the point, she had deal with the care homes when Covid ripped through them last year to want a rerun. 

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All of us - wife, daughter, son in law, grandson - he only gets a flu vaccine at his age - brothers and brothers in law have had the 3 covid and the flu jab.

 

I noticed that the booster didn't show up in my covid vaccine history in the app.

 

imagine my somewhat surprised pleasure to see the booster now showing. 5 weeks after I had it, but it's now there.

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I had my top-up on Tuesday last. I got the fizzer one. The main one had been the Astro-Verruca

All was well for a few hours, then I got extremely tired and got the shakes. Shakes like wot you see someone having in cartoons. Took to my bed, and was out for several hours. And from that time until today my arm has been hurting, not so bad as on Tuesday but still.

 

At least I'm still alive to feel the hurts unlike a chap I knew via someone else. He refused the vax. 10 days ago he got the C-19, died within 3 days, funeral next week*, held off cos his son, also a vax refuser is in ICU and might be out for the planting

 

* we usually plant about 2nd or 3rd day after kicking off

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SWJBO and myself had our boosters last week.  Painless injection, but I did feel a bit under the weather that evening; SWMBO was fine (typical!).  The booster was the Moderna, original jabs were AstraZenica, presumably they are compatible.  We did have a fifteen mile round trip to get the jabs, though, no appointments available locally.

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On 26/11/2021 at 19:35, Dogtail2 said:

However I shall refrain from posting anything vaccine related in future if it is deemed too sensitive here in a Covid thread.

You're right about that.

People just don't want to listen or pay attention to any criticism or disagreement with  COVID measures,  vaccines included. No matter how valid such criticism or disagreement may be.

 

John

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If there were any valid criticism in the masses of nonsense being sprouted, it may be missed because it both rare and is drowned in the sheer volume of nonsense and selfish "blindness" to the possible consequences to others.  Some people just don't want to accept any restrictions on their behaviour, nor believe that pandemics are real and deadly, nor that "establishment science" really is trying to do its best.  Unfortunately this extends to some leading politicians and (more understandably, perhaps) to the travel business. The damage done by one rogue scientist's fake claims against the MMR vaccine, and publicity whipped up by the gutter press to boost circulation, is still being felt.

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My first jag was painless but I was ill for about 2 days. I felt the second one but no particular after effects. Both were AstraZeneca. 

I had my third on Thursday, Pfizer this time. No problem apart from She Who Must Be Obeyed battering me on the arm in the middle of the night trying to get an unfair share of the duvet. I felt that but nothing else so far. 

I got my flu jag at work a couple of weeks ago as we deal with medically vulnerable kids. 

John 

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