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Covid Jab


DMC

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1 hour ago, bentwaters81tfw said:

Nah, it just kills the nerves in your leg.

I think it’s the microchip blocking a nerve!

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Just for information for those who do not know as stuff is not always well explained. The shivering people are feeling is because the body is reacting to what it thinks is an infection. One of the ways it does this is by raising body temperature as most infections can only thrive in a limited temperature range. It also increases the metabolic rate so the body is working harder. It is a defence mechanism common at least to all mammals. Because the core temperature is raised and the peripheral blood vessels constrict, we feel cold and the physiological response to that is to shiver. In the case of vaccination the effect is often transient and everything returns to normal fairly quickly. In the case of infection the body goes through cycles of raising temperature and then trying to cool down by dilating blood vessels in the skin and sweating (a raised temperature is bad long term and too high a temperature, about42-4 °C, will kill as some body processes start to fail). This is why it is important to drink plenty as fluid loss through evaporative cooling can be quite high, normal insensible fluid loss as it is called, can be up to 500ml daily so you can see why. Of course a raised temperature can disturb sleep and affects appetite which is one reason why people feel like 💩. 500+ million years of vertebrate evolution has produced some wonderfully intricate balancing mechanisms.

A bit of a simplified explanation and those who are still in practice will see the gaps, but it is now a few years since I have to remember this stuff 

Who is going to have a reaction to the Covid19 vaccine is largely unknowable and tough on those who have one.

Mrs T has said that even those patients she has spoken to who have reacted to the vaccine still reckon it is a better risk than a lengthy stay in ICU or being dead. 

I am 67 and had a sore arm and felt a bit off it on the morning afterwards, but felt OK by lunchtime. 

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Yep, that was me when I had my jab.  Raised temperature but, conversley, felt extremely cold and shivering uncontrollably with blankets around me.  Next morning, no problems; bright and breezy and ready for a good days modelling.  Weird or what!

 

Mike

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2 hours ago, Mr T said:

Just for information for those who do not know as stuff is not always well explained. The shivering people are feeling is because the body is reacting to what it thinks is an infection. One of the ways it does this is by raising body temperature as most infections can only thrive in a limited temperature range. It also increases the metabolic rate so the body is working harder. It is a defence mechanism common at least to all mammals. Because the core temperature is raised and the peripheral blood vessels constrict, we feel cold and the physiological response to that is to shiver. In the case of vaccination the effect is often transient and everything returns to normal fairly quickly. In the case of infection the body goes through cycles of raising temperature and then trying to cool down by dilating blood vessels in the skin and sweating (a raised temperature is bad long term and too high a temperature, about42-4 °C, will kill as some body processes start to fail). This is why it is important to drink plenty as fluid loss through evaporative cooling can be quite high, normal insensible fluid loss as it is called, can be up to 500ml daily so you can see why. Of course a raised temperature can disturb sleep and affects appetite which is one reason why people feel like 💩. 500+ million years of vertebrate evolution has produced some wonderfully intricate balancing mechanisms.

A bit of a simplified explanation and those who are still in practice will see the gaps, but it is now a few years since I have to remember this stuff 

Who is going to have a reaction to the Covid19 vaccine is largely unknowable and tough on those who have one.

Mrs T has said that even those patients she has spoken to who have reacted to the vaccine still reckon it is a better risk than a lengthy stay in ICU or being dead. 

I am 67 and had a sore arm and felt a bit off it on the morning afterwards, but felt OK by lunchtime. 

Thank you - I will steal that with  pride if I may, although I will not cut and paste you 😀

 

That is a very credible and cogent argument that will be helpful in talking to those for whom this is an information defecit problem.

 

For the others....

https://youtu.be/49XjMDnlfn0

 

Edited by Pigpen
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Its been 24hrs since I took the jab . . .

I am pleased to say , no temperature, no loss of appertite and even the entry point for the needle isnt bothering me . . .

 

I hope many of you yet to have the jab are lucky to avoid any issues

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In England the 50-59 age group are now being called. When they called my age group, a letter arrived in a couple of days of the announcement.

 

Credit where credit’s due, the call-up for vaccinations is very well organised and run.

 

Trevor

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Good evening all,

Had my first dose of the Oxford AZ jab yesterday lunchtime and, apart from the arm ache at entry point, had no initial side effects.

Roll on to 0100 hours this morning and had typically flu like shivers - cue Mr Paracetamol. Roll on again to 0400 hours and then it was hot flushes, Mr P to the rescue again.

However, walking the dog on a beautiful sunny Spring morning cured any remaining lethargy and side effects.

At 60 I am happy to get mine underway and as a friend says, the alternative is not a happy option.

The organisation at Derby Arena was fantastic and I managed to be done before I was due in!

Take care and stay safe.

Nigel.

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I heard it through the grapevine (cue Marvin Gaye song) that the 50-55s will be called from next week (15th). Apparently the GP's in our areas will be doing the 'at risk' patients and most over people are being directed to the big site at Elland Road or one of other. Our practice is getting a load of vaccine later this week and Mrs T is working extra again. 

Let's all stay safe for a while longer and keep our fingers crossed. 

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3 minutes ago, KLN said:

60 years of age and not expecting to hear anything till around September.

 

Very surprised to hear that, are you in Norfolk, East Anglia or Norfolk, Virginia. If the former you should contact your GP or vaccination Centre as round here all the 60's have been vaccinated that want it. 

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1 minute ago, Mr T said:

Very surprised to hear that, are you in Norfolk, East Anglia or Norfolk, Virginia. If the former you should contact your GP or vaccination Centre as round here all the 60's have been vaccinated that want it. 

East Anglia, were 3 months behind in starting :(

 

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1 hour ago, KLN said:

60 years of age and not expecting to hear anything till around September.

 

 

1 hour ago, Mr T said:

I heard it through the grapevine (cue Marvin Gaye song) that the 50-55s will be called from next week (15th). Apparently the GP's in our areas will be doing the 'at risk' patients and most over people are being directed to the big site at Elland Road or one of other. Our practice is getting a load of vaccine later this week and Mrs T is working extra again. 

Let's all stay safe for a while longer and keep our fingers crossed. 


It was in BBC News yesterday.  Said that 55-59 year olds will be contacted in the following week but there was a link where you can go online and book it - offered several locations and then several dates and then several times.

 

This is the link.  If you 55 or over I believe you can just use this to book the jab yourself.

 

https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/coronavirus-covid-19/coronavirus-vaccination/book-coronavirus-vaccination/

 

Worked for me.

 

Cheers,

 

Nigel

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2 hours ago, KLN said:

60 years of age and not expecting to hear anything till around September.

 

I know you guys are a bit behind the curve north of the border :wicked:, but seriously, I'm in the over 60 bracket and had mine almost a month ago :syringe:I suggest you kick you health provider. I hear the N&N are not always as sharp as they aught to be.

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My wife and I just got our letters saying that we can book our jabs.

 

I appreciate it has to be done this way because not everyone is IT savvy it's just that the wasted money is such a shame.

 

Our letter will go straight into recycling as we have already used the reporting link to book our jabs online.

 

Cheers,

 

Nigel

 

 

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1 hour ago, nheather said:

it's just that the wasted money is such a shame

I would imagine that employing people to ensure that letters were only sent out when needed (or writing programs to do the same) would actually be far more expensive than just posting a letter to everyone in the database. This page makes interesting reading

 

https://www.finder.com/uk/mobile-internet-statistics

 

There is an inverse relationship between the urgency of getting vaccination out and smartphone/IT access. And ownership alone is misleading - my folks have smartphones, but for them its just a telephone. They ignore everything else, including texts.

I wish more companies would keep this in mind as they attempt to move to an online only world. There is an large number of elderly people being increasingly cut-off from services or being made dependant on others to do what my daughter calls 'life admin'

 

Cheers

 

Colin

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3 hours ago, ckw said:

I would imagine that employing people to ensure that letters were only sent out when needed (or writing programs to do the same) would actually be far more expensive than just posting a letter to everyone in the database. This page makes interesting reading

 

 

I know, that's why I said "I appreciate it has to be done this way", I was just commenting that it is a shame.  Because I would not be surprised if each letter sent out costs over £1.

 

But as you say, the cost of doing a more targeted delivery would cost more than it would save.

 

Cheers,

 

Nigel

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3 hours ago, ckw said:

There is an large number of elderly people being increasingly cut-off from services

Not just elderly. No mobile phone signal anywhere near my village and that is increasingly making it hard to do things online. I think the people making these systems don't realise that a lot of people don't have a mobile phone.

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@nheather I would imagine that letters were prepared in advance, waiting only for the government to announce when the next group was eligible. Given the sheer numbers involved it’s probably the only way to roll out the scheme. When I was talking to the fireman giving me my jab, he said there were volunteers elsewhere in Chester Racecourse inputting information onto GP databases that afternoon. I had to ring my GP a couple of days later and sure enough my jab details were already there.

 

Whilst getting the jab I was also given my appointment for the second one too.

 

Trevor

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No idea how it is going in other parts of the country but my eldest son who is 49 years old and lives in Aberdeen was called in by his GP last week for his first jag and our youngest who lives down here in sunny Angus sur Mere and is 45 got a call this afternoon from his GP to get the first jag on Thursday afternoon , neither are in any particular risk group.

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55 minutes ago, Des said:

No idea how it is going in other parts of the country but my eldest son who is 49 years old and lives in Aberdeen was called in by his GP last week for his first jag and our youngest who lives down here in sunny Angus sur Mere and is 45 got a call this afternoon from his GP to get the first jag on Thursday afternoon , neither are in any particular risk group.

 

I knew that the Scots benefitted from free prescriptions and free university education but I didn't realise that they got free luxury cars too - outrageous ;)

 

Cheers,

 

Nigel

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42 minutes ago, nheather said:

I knew that the Scots benefitted from free prescriptions and free university education but I didn't realise that they got free luxury cars too - outrageous ;)

 Been discussed before ,  JAB is just a bit too pretentious up this end of the world , used to have a one-armed School Dentist in primary school and he really did give JAGS with a syringe in his only hand , would have been more accurate throwing it like a dart and it does colour ones attitude in life not only to Dentistry but to any form of injection.

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Whilst grabbing lunch to go today from the big M, guy refused to wear a mask to collect his order "cos I've 'ad the jab aint I?"

He wouldn't accept that it didn't make you immune, and you still have to wear a mask...

Felt sorry for the staff member involved.

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10 minutes ago, Bigdave22014 said:

Whilst grabbing lunch to go today from the big M, guy refused to wear a mask to collect his order "cos I've 'ad the jab aint I?"

He wouldn't accept that it didn't make you immune, and you still have to wear a mask...

Felt sorry for the staff member involved.

 This is what sensible people who listen to the experts and do what they advise are up against everywhere it seems nowadays

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