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Putty/Filler Recommendations


nheather
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Are there any putty/filler products that are soft to apply but set hard.

 

Ones that I have tried do the job but end up flexible or chalky.

 

Tamiya putty for example - Tamiya products are normally great but the putty that I have is nice and soft, easy to apply but when it dries it shrinks and remains flexible like a hard rubber.

 

I also use the Vallejo stuff with a very thin nozzle - I like that, certainly for precision jobs, but it always seems a little chalky when set.

 

It would be really nice to have something that sets like polystyrene plastic and can be sanded and scribed just like plastic.

 

Interested in other recommendations.

 

I'm not talking about the two part clays like green stuff or milliput - they have their place for moulding but I'm talking about filling holes and gaps.

 

Cheers,

 

Nigel

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38 minutes ago, nheather said:

It would be really nice to have something that sets like c and can be sanded and scribed just like plastic.

I think the answer is ...  polystyrene plastic. I dissolve sprues in Tamiya liquid poly and it works well. You need to experiment to get the proportions that suit you best (I usually have a couple of bottles of varying gloopiness). Takes longer to dry than most commercial putties (but faster than Milliput). Another advantage is it adds strength to joints.

 

The only other filler I use for quick fixes is superglue with a sprinkle of talc, which sands OK if you don't let it set too long and can be scribed.

 

Cheers

 

Colin

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What has already being said about the melted runners, especially if there is going to be a need for re-scribing re-riveting as the melted plastic has the same properties near enough as the original plastic.

 

You may want to look at Tamiya airbrush cleaner as it seems to have the same properties as their extra thin but is a lot cheaper and makes fine melted runners. I use clear runners for my filler as it seem the purest and for some reason doesn't get many air bubbles, it can be coloured with a few drops of cellulose based paint.

 

The only water based filler I will use is milliput as it sticks to the surface the other I have tried like perfect? and vallheyho are no better than polyfilla in my experience, prone to coming loose and goes soft if rewetted.

 

For bigger jobs Iike knifing putty or 3M acryl putty they are cellulose based adhere to the plastic and can be smoothed out with cellulose type thinners on a cotton bud.

 

I won't use superglue as it just seems to go everywhere but where it is wanted and then promptly sets rock hard.

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Using the plastic sprues from the kit you are making seems to be popular.

Just have some soaking in Tamiya Thin for a few days . .. 

Fortunately for me, I made some for the HK Lancaster to fill in the holes etc but as the fuselage broke clean in half, it has become a god send . . . .

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  • 3 weeks later...

Options for filling:

 

1. ⁠Water based acrylic fillers — can be brittle, but with practice you can fill and smooth with a wet finger. Sand dry w very fine sanding stick.

2. ⁠Primer — mask it off and spot apply. Then sand and polish.

3. ⁠Mr Surfacer — 500 for really deep scratches, 1500 for really fine ones. Buff and polish after a day or two of full curing. Might be able to use IPA to smooth it and keep out of panel lines.

4. ⁠Sprue goo — mix some sprue into some liquid cement like Tamiya extra thin. Keep adding sprue until it is a thick goo. Use a toothpick, apply a thin layer, let cure for 1-2 days until hard. Sand, buff, and polish.

5. ⁠CA — can be brittle, might not stick well.

6. ⁠CA mixed with baby powder — not as brittle, sands, buffs, and polishes well. Easy to rescribe through as it is not brittle. Must be sanded within 2-3 hours or it dries too hard to sand.

 

For sanding marks, either Mr Surfacer or sprue goo are my two preferences, with sprue goo being my first choice.

 

For filling gaps I like to press cut up bits of sheet styrene into the gap, snip off excess, spread some sprue goo, let is

t set then sand it down. 
 

Tim

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Another vote for CA and talc.

 

You can also experiment with different type of CA for different characteristics in terms of setting times, stiffness and workability.  My usual filler is a Gel type CA and talc. Easy to apply and you're able to sand it soon after application.  Sets hard but not too hard. Takes a scribed line extremely well. I also like how you can remove excess without it eating into the kit styrene. You need to experiment but a good start is 30% talc to CA, the amount of talc trading off workability with hardness.  Typically I think my mix is 50:50. 

 

The only fillers I use these days are CA (thin gaps and ensuring no ghost seams), CA/Talc (bigger gaps, filling panel lines for rescribing,, general small shaping), Gunze Mr Surfacer 500 (very small defects) and Milliput with water.

 

Milliput is also brilliant for the small jobs like filling narrow long gaps. I tape either side, use a tooth pick to apply, wipe off excess with a moist Q-tip, remove tape and wipe excess gently again and it needs little if any sanding. The benefit is no damage to surrounding kit plastic and sticks and sets hard. 

 

Ray

 

 

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29 minutes ago, Ray_W said:

Milliput is also brilliant for the small jobs like filling narrow long gaps. I tape either side, use a tooth pick to apply, wipe off excess with a moist Q-tip, remove tape and wipe excess gently again and it needs little if any sanding. The benefit is no damage to surrounding kit plastic and sticks and sets hard. 

I do the same trip but with CA and talc. I tape and apply with a toothpick and then run the toothpick sideways along the join and remove the excess. It flows enough to fill the join

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