Jump to content

1/35: Dingo and Cromwell Diorama Nijmegen 1944


Recommended Posts

spacer.png

 

With tanks and infantry, the Grenadier Guards managed to fight through Hunner Park to the south end of the road bridge. Machine guns firing, heavy weapons in action, shaking the streets with their explosions, covering everything in clouds of dust from the pulverized masonry. The bridge was shaking with the explosions. Skidding, shaking, firing the Guards' tanks, they reached the other side.

The attack to seize the Nijmegen road bridge (Waalbrug) was carried out by the senior battalion of the Armored Guards Division. AoS sign white 51 over red square is owned by the 2nd Btn Guards Grenadiers. The division's second senior battalion, 1st  Armoured Btn Coldstream Guards, AoS sign white 52 over red square, was not on the bridge at the time, but was employed further east of the corridor to aid the American 82nd Airborne.

 

spacer.png

 

The scene of this Diorama is about the 2sd Welsh Guards on their way towards the Arnhem road, 21/09/1944. To make this diorama, I used a 12X12in base.  There are 14 figures in total.

 

spacer.png

 

The vegetation is Woodland Scenics. The street floor was sculpted to look like the brick floor. Also including the building's architecture, I hope I have managed to make the scene look as close as possible to what it was at the time, of a Dutch city.

 

spacer.png

 

A military police officer from the Guards Armored Divisional Provost Company guides traffic near the bridge. The figure of the MP is Hornet, as are the 2 figures of tankers. The Cromwell tank in full markings: The Guards formation badge and the AoS sign of a white 45 on a green and blue square, identifying the armoured recce regiment of an armoured division. Also show is the bridge classification marking.

 

spacer.png

 

The old and good kit of Tamiya Dingo, The figure of the officer and the sniper are Hornet, with resin heads. The Dingo figures are Miniart. The plaque on the wall: “Verboden Toegang” (Forbiden Access).

 

spacer.png

 

With the marks of the 2nd Armored Battalion Irish Guards. Dingos were used as vehicles in liaison tasks. It was the Shermans of the Irish Guards who led the advance of the Waal across the road to Arnhem.

 

spacer.png

 

The AoS sign of a White 53 on red square of the Irish Guards, The seated figure has headphones for the radio operator. The accessories that complete the model are made of resin. Jerrycans are from Tamiya.

 

spacer.png

 

spacer.png

 

spacer.png

 

spacer.png

 

spacer.png

 

Miniart British Tank Riders (35118). Cromwell has a very large empty space, so the choice to place the figures there was obvious. It was not common for the British to use tanks to transport troops, just as the Russians did with their infantry, but for the scene, I believe he agreed, just to symbolize the need for the hurry to send infantry to the other side of the Waal.

 

spacer.png

 

The  C Squadron sign in the White is cleary visible on the stowage Box on the side of the vehicle.

 

spacer.png

 

A beautiful final view of the diorama, showing the Cromwell Tank of 2nd Welsh Guards crossing the street at Nijmegen. An C Squadron Sign (circle) enclosing a number 1 is barely visible on the left rear hull of the model.

 

spacer.png

 

The classic British Red Phone Box, making its presence here. I believe it is not common to be seen in the Netherlands, but I found it interesting to add it to the diorama. There is an illustration of the box cover of the Master Box 3533 kit, which served as inspiration. Highlight for the German / Dutch bilingual sign warning of danger of mines.

 

spacer.png

 

The figures are Tamiya. The last is Hornet. The bike is Master Box.

 

spacer.png

 

spacer.png

 

I respect those who in the past have fought for this bridge. In terms of model making, it was a lot of fun to make this Diorama. The hard work in doing it was a pleasure.

 

Thanks for watching!

Fábio.

 

 

 

 

 

Edited by fpmeyer
  • Like 47
  • Thanks 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

Excellent !

 

Dare I say lifted from the Francois Verlinden school of diorama building but elevated by many levels and your attention to historical detais is as impressive as the attention to detail which you have applied to the scene as a whole.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Jaw dropping.

 

Modelling taken to another level.

 

Dick

Link to post
Share on other sites

Fabulous Dio - all the bits work with the building and figures being particularly nicely finished.

My single observation (and I cringe at myself!) is that the Cromwell driver is wearing 60's style plastic "ski/MotoX" goggles.

Super work

Rob

Link to post
Share on other sites

That is simply stunning. the Dingo, the Cromwell, the figures, the buildings, they're all brilliant. Just one nitpick. I don't think that the phone box would have "telephone" on it in Holland. I could be wrong???

 

John.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 06/12/2020 at 08:56, Matt Parvis said:

Is the building scratch built?

 

 

 

Hi Matt!

 

Good that you liked it. Ya scracht. There is an old model from Verlinden, which served as inspiration to make the building.

 

Best regards,
Fábio.

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 06/12/2020 at 09:56, robgizlu said:

Cromwell driver is wearing 60's style plastic "ski/MotoX" goggles.

 

Hi Rob!

 

I got it from a Dragon kit of American tankers. It is a real Model:

spacer.png

Cheers,

Fábio.

Edited by fpmeyer
  • Haha 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, fpmeyer said:

Hi Rob!

 

I got it from a Dragon kit of American tankers. It is a real Model:

spacer.png

Cheers,

Fábio.

 

I'm so sorry :blush::blush:

You live and learn :lol:

Now - I Like it all the more!!!

Best 

Rob

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 06/12/2020 at 10:00, Bullbasket said:

 I don't think that the phone box would have "telephone" on it in Holland. I could be wrong???

 

John.

 

Hello Jonh!

 

His observation was great: I believe that the term "Telephone" is known worldwide. For this reason, I think that it is not wrong, or even that the modeler made a mistake, although I could have used "Telefoon" which is the most correct Dutch word.

 

Cheers,

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...