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70s F1 Restoration Shop 1/20 scale


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@silver911, hi Ron, well, thanks very much!  I really appreciate it - both the words, and the ideas!  If you look to the right side of the junk area, you'll see two oil drums - I scratch built them, using old model truck rims to get the correct diameter - now, looks like time to add at least one more - if I can just find another couple of rims!  funnily enough the broom sounds like an interesting challenge - maybe use an old toothbrush for the head? I don't know yet...?  You're right about the fluid trays  - not sure how I'll make those.  The versions I've seen have been molded plastic tanks, with a depression in the top to collect oil/fluid - well...maybe carve the form out of wood, then wrap in alu foil then paint?....? and - trash bins - maybe also use the the wheel rim idea?  Only use one rim for the base, wrap in alu foil? leave silver?  For something so commonplace,  it might be a task to figure out how to do!  As always, you've provided some great ideas! 

 

And, yes, various steps to dirty up the floor.  Oil is tricky - it shouldn't look like straight oil, as any shop will throw down some absorbent material after they've cleaned up the bulk of the spill - maybe the enamel on first, followed by a sprinkling of pigment or pastel dust? and, general dust around the edges of the shop floor - for this, maybe just faint pigment?  I have some light dust color somewhere!  

 

@bar side, hmmm....maybe I can find one of the 1/20 pickups I've seen?  and go to town reworking it?  Maybe with a flatbed or utility body in back of course (why not make it interesting too!), loaded with body parts coming back from the paint shop???  that might be a fun project.  

 

For now, I'm working on various elements on the walls - I cut two windows into the metal wall fronting on the driveway, and will install some awnings.   This wall was just looking a bit dull and tall!

 

I've also been fooling around with trying to force some perspective into the wood shed - at least an effort to make it look deeper.   As is, I've included a few out-of-sight openings for indirect light - I'll have to take it outside and see if this works (I should have tested months ago, but never got around to it).  I also painted the floors and walls with a few different shades of grey to black (lighter in front, darker in back), with the intent of giving the illusion of some depth.  This has had mixed results, of course depending on where the overall light source is coming from - too much light, not too great, less light, almost believable! 

 

I thought about and experimented with building an awning over the door opening.  This does indeed make the area darker/blocks light, but the awning looks ridiculous!  there just isn't enough room between the trim on top of the door opening and bottom of the windows above to look like anything that would be seen on a real building.  This is still in the R&D department - maybe the awning reaches all the way up to the base of the windows? rather than to the base of the trim beneath them?   I just don't know yet.

 

Yesterday I added shelf with some boxes to the most visible wall, with both the boxes and shelf made shallow - again trying to give the impression of some depth, where I didn't before.  Another choice that I now wonder about, is why didn't I just make the interior of the shed wider to begin with??!!  As I recall it had something to do with my thoughts about perception - if looks like (were to have been) the correct width, it might have been harder to compensate for the shallow depth?  too late to be that worried about it now.  😁

 

So, on we go - thanks for having a look 

 

Cheers, and stay well - 

Nick 

 

 

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Hi Nick...glad you like the suggestions :)

 

For a broom...I would look at the cheap Hog's hair brushes...nice and course for a broom...a cut down flat would work...and usually very cheap.

As for drip trays...in many garages of that period a common oven baking tray was used...as did many home mechanics...so doesn't need to be fancy mate 😉

 

Remember...false perspective is created with careful shading and shadowing...using pastels/pigments is the easiest way to do this.

 

As always...your work is intuitive and inspirational.

 

Ron

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@silver911, thanks again for the tips!  You'll keep me on this forever!! As to the perspective...see below - this seems to be more about light sources than interior treatment!  

 

Hello guys,

 

Well, today I'll unfold the story with a new plot twist - sunlight!  😎 🌞  It's my very favorite aftermarket accessory!  It's free, and it's bright today! 

 

Please take a look:

 

51116813690_d6f33e80df_b.jpg\

 

I think the leaves paid off!

 

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The two above are not the same - notice the with and without tree shadow.  I need to keep in mind sun orientation, as sometimes what I think is an ideal photo, isn't.   That said, "outdoor" items, like the scrap heap aren't all that dependent on sun direction - just shows a different time of day/season.  Happily, as shown below, you can tell the air compressor and engine puller are back there - my little side shed seems to work fie in keeping out the light - and in the back, behind the compressor, unwanted views.  
 

51116018996_935467f20f_b.jpg

 

You can catch a glimpse of some visual clutter inside the shed above - 

 

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And after all that, the shed, with it's new awning (which I now see isn't level!!), shelf, boxes, shading, and not quite direct light - and....you really can't see much at all in there! 😁  some faint outlines of shades of grey on the walls - but, remember, a race car will be seen here, so the majority of the background won't be evident at all - which is fine.  I was more concerned that this space would be too light, and not look like a deeper shed - 

 

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The grand shed again, with loosely fit doors, from a different angle (sorry about the taller background bldg) - and no, still can't see in....at all!! 

 

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Ahh- the sun to the back - well, nice interior effects! as you'll see more below, but, not a very good way to present the overall building - too dark.

 

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You might recall, earlier I mentioned shading and fooling around with the treatment of the "glass" - this is exactly what I wanted.  If this were clear glass, you'd see all sorts of stuff in the background that I don't want you too! People, cars, dogs, plants - all at real people scale, which I find to be unacceptably distracting! especially after putting this much work into a project! 

 

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The best part of these awnings - their shadows on the driveway!  

 

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And back to the little shed - sun to the back.  A few things did work here (though you still can't really see in).  First, I built a little box/eave around the upstairs windows (not part of the larger garage below) to allow some, but not direct light, suggesting there are other upper floor windows too - and the space could be occupied, maybe an office?  Second, if you look carefully at the threshold, between the driveway and garage floor you can see some light!  On top of the back wall, above the sight line, I cut in a really big opening, then added a sheet of dense metal mesh as a diffuser - the idea to allow some light in - maybe suggesting a side window? or from a loft above? you can see the slightly illuminated parts boxes - this is also where a car will be parked, and the top of the engine will be seen - I'm hoping those brushed aluminum trumpets sparkle! - oh, and note the "giant" tree (though without leaves, not bad) to the upper right - well, final pics won't be taken here -  I have a place in mind where I can "mange" the blue sky a bit better!

 

51116813615_24dce5e40d_b.jpg

 

Another version of above, but straight on - even with my "clever" light ports, well...just a dark space.  I should note, that in real life, my eyes can see to the back - but, evidently too faint for the camera, which is fine by me!

 

So, on we go - @bar side, I did go ahead and order a 1/20 scale pickup - aught to be a nice addition and fun little project.  

 

Next, I think I'll go back into the main shop and begin adding some grime to the floor - and my checklist from Ron!!  😁

 

Have a great day guys, happy model building, and stay well,

 

Nick 

 

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great work. I love all the details you added.

853160_1.jpg

Talking about the grinder. Every place I've worked in had the grinder mounted on a pedestal.

We never had it mounted on the bench. But your garage seems to run out of floor space so it better stay on the bench

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Wonderful...you can never beat real  sunlight for showing things in their true perspective...however...this does ask another question of you Nick...internal lighting! 😱🤣🤬

 

I have worked with this lady (Jennifer) several times on lighting projects for models...very nice lady...extremely helpful and knowledgeable on all things in miniature lighting.......

 

https://www.smallscalelights.co.uk/product/modern-strip-light-kit

 

I'll shut up now mate :)

 

Ron

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Hi mate...I note your 'confused' emoji above following my previous post regarding lighting.

I assume you will have a roof on the finished workshop...hence my comment about internal lighting etc. :)

 

Ron

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@silver911 - arrgghh! ha! Ron- you'll have me working on this forever! 😁 - well....lighting - I'm not so sure.  I have used LEDs before, with pretty good luck.  That said, I'm not sure for this one?  to be put in the ideas box of now.

 

@Orso - hello, and thanks for leaving the photo.  Yes, the bench grinder - my sense is if this were a machines shop, I'd go for the pedestal, and to your point, I'm running out of room!  I have seen, and had bench grinders as shown.  That installation might come more from purpose, that is, if used once in a while, the bench is fine, but if used frequently, the pedestal?  I don't know - 😁  I did think about trying what you suggested, as it would look nice, but I really don't have the room.

 

On to today's update.  Yesterday I received an AMT GMC Sonoma 4x4 pickup model kit!  interestingly, it comes with a lift kit installed.   Hmmm, interesting.  That said, it turns out I'm relatively familiar with 4x4 trucks, and have spent more than a few hours working on their suspensions in real life.  The GMC 4x4 uses a solid/straight rear axle, and an independent front suspension/axle.  The front end was (is still?) fairly complicated, and not at all east to lift, without careful attention being paid to the almost all of it! unlike a "live" or solid front axle - lots of geometry to consider, lowering the differential and so on - as opposed to torsion bar or twin beam suspensions, which are also not easy to modify, but less awkward, and a lot more challenging than solid axles.  More on this as we carry on.

 

First though, what might this truck look like when I'm done?   A ratty old shop truck or something a bit nicer?  Some examples:

 

51121419073_a9c863d6ef_z.jpg

 

Above, some nice examples of the broad category of choices!  I've seen many of the "just add a flatbed" versions running around, and I've never like them - on mid or full sized trucks.  The other choice is more complicated, but they sure look better!  I'm going the route of something nicer than just a bed.

 

I usually don't comment too much on the quality of a kit, in this case, one made by AMT  I've got to say, something of a mixed bag.  Surprisingly some parts, and particularly the body and chassis are pretty nice.  The rest so far, not ideal - that said, the kits built for this project have been Tamiya and Studio27 - which are much higher quality, but more expensive.  I've got two separate gripes.  First, regarding fit - well - this is weird.  Locating pins are not usually the same size/diameter of the receiving point - sometimes altogether different!  So, generous glue and patience required to make the parts go, and stay together.  Next, is accuracy, but more on that to follow.  All my whining aside, so far looks pretty good:

 

51121257384_09ac01613a_b.jpg

 

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At first glance, not bad at all - and as I was fiddling with putting this together, I thought, not that bad, but basically fine (except, take a look at the front diff/suspension - not sure what this is supposed to be - more on this below).  Then, let's take a look at the rear end:

 

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Well - what to be said about all of this?? it's a mess.  I'm not sure what AMT was trying to do here, but it does not look like any rearend I've worked on.  What you can't see is I cut off both axle shafts from the diff, and rotated them 180 degrees, the diff sure looked to have been molded upside down - among other problems, this made it nearly impossible to install the driveshaft, which by the way was too short (as was the front).  Next, the kit uses axle blocks to accomplish the lift, rather than rearched springs, which is a fairly common and inexpensive method.  But, key to this method is mounting the blocks on top of the center of the leaf springs.  Not the case here - in fact, a pretty odd asymmetric location, with some molded in locating tabs - also weird.  So for this, I cut off the tabs and drilled holes in the centerline of the axle, blocks and leaf springs and inserted metal rods,  You'll also see I made of an axle truss  - after cutting off the shafts, the remount (using a rod inserted) remained weak - so, the truss, just like in real life, helps make it rigid. 

 

The next, and most visually apparent problem - those shock mounts.  Uhhh? what were they thinking?  maybe something to limit axle wrap?? not a shock absorber though.  The rear end should look like this:

 

51121514106_ee0b41ddc8_c.jpg

The shocks should be mounted to the axle, though in many instances they are mounted to the axle, via a plate as shown, but not in the location shown - I will make it look like the picture in the upper left above - tabs on the axle and chassis.  You can see the geometry above - the shocks are closer to vertical than horizontal!  and that's how this will wind up!  Next - the front end.  Well, as you can seen in the upper right, the real trucks front end looks nothing like the kit - so, that will be fixed too.  I didn't realize how wonky it was until it was built - I even added metal axle shafts, but still, in real need of reapir.

 

Back to the shop and more details - I decided to make up parts for the top of the heads - cam shafts, carriers, and lifers.  While a bit tedious, not all that hard to do.  Take a look:

 

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And, these will go into the red trolley, except, one camshaft, that our trusty mechanic will be holding:

 

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So, progress is being made!

 

Today, that truck - fix suspension and build a bed - the shiny aluminum version!

 

Thanks for having a look!

Cheers

Nick 

Edited by Stickframe
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Nice updates and I love the sunshine shots. Nice preplanning on the shadows for effect.

The truck is fairly typical for it's time. They probably had a normal one moulded and suddenly, jacked up is the look. Panic!

This is the result. It would suit most, and might look good when finished, but I understand your wanting to correct the errors.

I've done similar plastic surgery in the past just for my own satisfaction.

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@Pete in Lincs you're probably right!  they make it just close enough - in fact the overall look is probably better than what you could get out of the real truck! 😁  And yes, the sun!! 🌞 it's the best!  That said, it is also pretty good at highlighting mistakes and flaws 😎

 

@silver911  Hi Ron, yes, I was joking with you!  This will get a roof, but of course, it will feature huge skylights!  like these (4'x8' and 4'x12':

 

51122420835_8461eddacd_b.jpg

 

Sorry about the quality of these - in reality the space is really bright - and shiny!

 

OK, back to the bench -

 

Cheers, and stay well 

 

Nick 

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Hello gents, 

 

Made some strong headway on the truck - most of the scratch building is now done!  The bed and some suspension changes about done - please take a look:

 

51123331732_a5e8073487_h.jpg

 

First up was setting a bed height - not just a sheet of styrene sitting on the chassis.  I found a piece of styrene that worked out to be about the right height, and built the subframe around this point - keeping the bed where I wanted it.  I know the bed would slope forward a bit, and I think this looks about right.

 

51123331712_7500b13451_b.jpg

 

Above, the new and improved rear end, and same for the front:

 

51123644469_cab4eacd16_c.jpg

 

This is still not right, but I think more convincing - the 90's era S10 truck uses an independent front end, with an elaborate framework holding the diff in place, and well - this is what I'm calling done. 

 

Now, onto the bed:

 

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Not too much left here -in terms of building.  Painting, another story, as it's not my favorite part of a build.  I think I'll leave the bed as polished aluminum - not sure about color for the cab - maybe the Tamiya burgundy?  depends on what the LHS has in stock.  If not, maybe some shade of red?  As the race cars a are black and blue, I'd like some variety - and yellow...not too forgiving!  Oh- the tail light housings are from the kit.  Just cut a notch into the bed and here they are - I'm pretty surprised by how well they seem to fit and look.  

 

And, a last image of what I have in mind here:

 

51124701675_7cf4492e44_h.jpg

 

Maybe some PC4 body parts? loaded on top of wood pallets?  coming from or going to the body shop?  Finally, there is something off about the rt front wheel - tho all the parts in the correct mounting points, it seems to be setback somewhat - not sure why?  I'm not getting into that - and calling it good.

 

OK, it's nice and  sunny here, and still early, so I might just go out and get some sun and fresh air!

 

Cheers and stay well - 

Nick 

 

 

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That’s looking very nice.  Couple of strapping points so you can strap down the load on the back.  Burgundy sounds a bit exotic!  Maybe a factory blue or something.  It’s got to blend in rather than stand out I guess, although it’s a very nice addition to the scene.  Maybe even a pallet load on the back?  Gearbox or similar?

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Hello dio builders, 

 

I'm calling the shop truck about done.  I scuffed it up a bit and will likely add a light wash of dust.  I added some race car parts being loaded/unloaded to the bed, from the PC4.  Please take a look:

 

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I'm not sure I like the basic design of this truck all that much.  I remember not being too impressed when it was released, and while I like the way this "sits", I'm still not all that captivated by the front.  

And now, whether I like it or not, seems I'll need to get into more work on the figures.  Good times....😁

 

Cheers, and stay well - 

Nick

 

 

 

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She looks great.  Love the orange.  She has an unusual look about her for sure - I think it’s that strong front bonnet (or should I say hood?) edge.  Nothing wrong with the build though.  Very nice

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And you said you didn't like the painting part! That looks just right. Impressive stuff.

Except, matt down and dirty those glossy tyres. I used to micromesh them when I built muscle cars.

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@bar side, thanks!  you did make me think about the color choice - which turned out better than I hoped.  For a minute, I thought about painting it a shade of green, but happily, I actually made a test strip for the color!  It did not look good - at all!  I just happened to have can of the orange in my stash.  It was supposed to be used for something else - but, it was too orange!  Another funny thing, the paint did not go on well at all, and the clearcoat made it look worse!  so, took to sanding it back, to knock off the orange peel - which looked more like raisin skin!! it was awful - then, repainted directly over the now sanded paint/clearcoat, and it turned out better than it could have!  As for the truck, I don't get why it took GM so many years to make these look better, and really the same for the Ford Ranger.  Both were very boxy, but good trucks (I had and '83 and '94 Ranger! both 4x4 and really trustworthy trucks).  Today, both look completely different - maybe even too extreme in the other directions! Lots of sweeping curves etc - like a college design student extravaganza! fit for an animated movie! 😁

 

@Pete in Lincs and @silver911, well Pete you and Ron both honed in on the problem with those tires!  I sanded them with a coarse sanding block - and you see the mediocre results!  Now, on to a good dust wash - these just look too bright and shiny!

 

Thanks for having a look 

 

Cheers and stay well - 

Nick 

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Hello dio builders,

 

I've spent the last couple of days painting figures.   I started with Vallejo IDF Sand primer, then followed with Scale75 skin tones.  The Scale75 set includes a set of basic figure painting instructions, which I found to be very helpful.  A special tip-o-the-brush to @silver911, Ron, who shared a link of some of his figure painting work - let's just say, it's in a radically different league than what I can do! very helpful to see tho - in a "this is what you should be trying to achieve" and "this is one way to achieve some great results" way, thanks again, Ron! 😁 . 

 

I've used Scale75 paint before, and found that I prefer blending the paint with Vallejo Thinner Medium, as it tends to allow for a more even coat/layers of paint, with fewer blobs of paint, than straight out of the bottle.  This worked out ok - please take a look:

 

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While these folks need to be tuned up, I'm basically happy with them so far.   Yes - a few unfortunate eyebrows....which will may be be addressed.   As I'm generally aware of my mediocre results with figures, I  need to consider the risk/reward associated with this "enhancement" - - if it works, great! they'll look better, on the other hand, If I don't keep a steady hand, or overdo the colors - a big mess!  Something not to ponder after a pint!  I've found drinking and painting don't mix - at all.  😁🍻

 

Because of the stance/pose of these figures and how I plan to use them, you'll clearly see the faces of Mr Serious, directly above, the smiling guy sitting down, and the gal with the light blue shirt.  The guys were comparatively easier to paint than the gal - because there faces are so angular and have so many contours cast in the resin, whereas the gal, has a more rounded face, which made blending of color edges (shade/shadow/full view) more important.  It took a few tries to get her where she is.  The face on the gal with the cap turned out pretty well, as her face is slightly more angular, but I don't think you'll see much of her face in the dio - but, I might change that, as she looks pretty good.  Another figure who looks way better than expected is the guy kneeling down (in the pic on the upper left, of the first grouping, gut in the middle), but, because of his position, it will be hard to see any of his face.  The guy to his left above, squatting with the cordless drill, looks pretty good too, but the angle of his head might make him hard to see too!  The guy laying down; A: didn't turn out to well; and B: will be under one of the cars, so might be fine.

 

I didn't paint any eyes, taking advice a good friend offered me years ago, which is to rely more on shading to give the appearance of eyes, than painting on eyes per se.  I appreciate this advice - it has effectively prevented me from painting comic/horrific attempts at adding "white dots" for eyes, which inevitably don't match in size, and usually wind up looking in two different directions!  

 

So still plenty of painting to go, these folks will need regular clothes! the beige is a fine base for adding various colors.  A few of the figures will be bearing jump suits, and the others more civilian "attire".  

 

Cheers, and stay well - 

 

Nick 

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Nick, Still better than my figure painting. 

I need to work on the blending perhaps. I like the 'give the impression of eyes' advice. 

Beer & paint, you are right there. Definite no no!

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An obvious detail many forget to add...oil and dirt on hands...and of course clothing...a very useful technique for dirt and dried stains on clothing are ground down chalk pastels...whereas oil and grease on skin will have a slight sheen (satin varnish with a hint of colour would work).

All depends on how far you want to go with them Nick 😉

 

Ron

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Hi Pete, thanks.  I don't seem to have the patience for learning/improving my skills with figure painting.  I think I do it better now than years ago, but honestly, I realize the results are usually ok, and every now and then nice.  That said, each time they get a little bit better, so I'll keep at it - I'm hopeful, they'll eventually be good.

 

Hi Ron, thanks for the tip -and your timing is very good.  As you'll see, we now have a group of clean and unhappily, shiny figures.   So, one task will be to figure out how to make them less shiny.  This always happens to me - even though I paint with Vallejo Model Air, which is said to be matte.  In fairness to the paint, more often than not, when applied to a vehicle, it is usually matte, which makes it a bit harder to use on things like racecars, where I'd rather have shinier finish - oh well.  And for dirty, that is a really good point - just like the shop floor and driveway, these folks need some grease/oil etc.  

 

Another problem I always run into is what colors for clothing?  I know - seems obvious enough, but I always struggle.  You'll see one guy laying down, so he's in a jumpsuit - the others a mix of clothing.  I did google colors that go together!  For the journalist, I typed in something like "woman in green pants and jacket" - and in most cases, the model wore a black jacket - though considerably more glamourous than this subject! - ok, on we go:

 

51141506250_b849ac3f37_b.jpg

 

Above, the guy and gal near the engine - they will be one group.  Despite my efforts to reorient this fellows head, it's still not looking very far upward, so it's hard to see his face, which it too bad, because the paint looks pretty good.  He is now holding a camshaft!  As I mentioned, the gal was tough to paint, because of the roundness of her face, but as a whole, I think she's turning out pretty well.  As she is wearing heavy gloves, I thought about placing her near the mill, but this would mean she and the guy sitting would need to be looking in the other direction - and her gloves, look more like welding gloves to me anyway, so they'll probably stay as is. 

Back to the guy - I'm still optimistic, that once photographed outdoors, the detail in his face will be more evident.

 

Above them, these fellows will be working on the rear end of a car - I tried a plaid shirt on the kneeling guy - his face also turned out pretty well, but will likely not be seen!  

 

As I mentioned, the glossy look is a common problem that I'll need to address - likely a quick run to the art store for some sort of clear, acrylic matte finish - that said, I've used "matte medium", after the fact,  does not guarantee a dull finish, so, any tips on this are appreciated!  On we go:

 

51139729762_ee615aefd8_b.jpg

 

Well - a guy just can't win with the key figures....these two will be pretty oblivious.  First, the journalist - she is loaded down with bags and cameras, so several straps etc - and despite my effort to amplify some contrast, well, not much to be seen.  Regarding her hair - it is not black, actually a dark brown with some auburn shade, which as lit, you can't tell is different than her jacket.  I think this contrast will be more evident when photographed outdoors.  Her face turned out pretty well, but thanks to her cap, of course it's in shade!!  Her scarf looks ok too, but also hard to see.  Again, maybe outdoors it will be more evident?  I hope so!

 

As for Mr Serious - I thought I couldn't go wrong with Levis and a leather jacket - well - I'm not sure, as he looks very "simple" even though the paint for the pants and jacket are both mixes of several shades - just not that apparent, again, maybe the lighting?  His shiny belt buckle and nice shoes help, even a red shirt!, which is next to impossible to see!  I'm not sold just yet - maybe I'm just tired of looking at him.  Anyway, one scenario will place these two in front of the PC4, which will be place just in front of the wood shed on the driveway.  In this case, they'd get plenty of sunlight, so maybe better results?  Or, another choice, inside the shop, over another car:

 

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This car will be in one of the service bays.  I think the three guys intently discussing the rear end will work fine - busily discussing whatever is going on back there.  The guy and the journalist though - I'm just not sure?  Maybe they should just stay outside?  The kneeling guy is really suffering from shiny pants!  Though, I do like his plaid shirt - even if not beautifully executed, it provides a nice contrast against all the other solid colors and machine parts.

 

Ok dio builders, have a good day - 

 

Cheers

Nick

 

 

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Well put me down as impressed anyway. Mr Serious just reminds me of the Fonz.

He does need to go outside to stop Photo Girl from taking pictures of that secret clutch/gearbox inside the shop.

The plaid shirt turned out just right. It makes a nice contrast to the solid colours.

Round faced Girl just needs to come forward a bit into the main field of vision of seated bloke.

 

If you look in the Armour section, a lot of soldiers uniforms turn out shiny. Others don't, so there must be a technique.

Shiny looks even worse on Military figures. Perhaps a dusting of pastels? 

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Hi Nick...lets look at your problem with 'shiny' acrylics...primary reason is the undercoat...although it says 'primer' it actually isn't in the correct sense...in reality...it's just a denser colour mix.

For figures...especially resin ones...a cheap auto motive primer is far better...as it will seal the resin completely...and provide a much better surface for the acrylics that follow...in as much as it allows the 'binder'...which is causing the shine...to sink in...and not remain on the surface.

Tamiya 'Fine White Primer' is also one of the best for figures...but expensive.

Another issue that causes the shine is not mixing the paint enough.

Tamiya X21 (Flat Base) is used by most painters...a couple of drops added to colours or mixes will eliminate any shine.

For matting down your figures...this is the finest by far you can buy.......https://www.modeldisplayproducts.co.uk/gsi-gunze-sangyo---mr-hobbysurfacer/mr-super-clear-varnish/mr-hobby-mr-super-clear-matt-spray-varnish

 

A word of warning...stay away from 'Dulcote'...trust me...it's horrendous stuff...and can cause a lot more problems than it solves.

 

That said...what you have achieved so far with the figures is really very good.

Where colours are concerned...you could have simplified your choices by giving them a 'uniform' so to speak...that way you bring them together as a group.

That would give you a free hand to go a bit different with the 'Journo'.

But these are only suggestions mate...as said...a very good approach to a difficult subject.

 

Respect

 

Ron

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Hi Ron @silver911 and Pete @Pete in Lincs, - well thanks and thanks!  Pete, good points! No spies in the shop! 😁

 

And, Ron, at this point, all I can say is shoot!  I wish I knew that about acrylic primer years ago!  In retrospect, having used lots of both Vallejo and Tamiya primers, I get your point.  I tend to use Tamiya (in cans) primer for (auto) body work and fine detail, like engines and transmissions, and Vallejo for military vehicles, diorama structures, and...figures!  And guess what?  I usually run into the problem of shiny figures.  

 

So, too late for this build - and on to knocking back the shine.  Thanks for the heads up on Dulcote.  I have used it before, but it seemed to go on chunky, like spray glue, which made me nervous, so I've avoided it. I appreciate your clarity.  I'll look for some Mr Surfacer as noted.  

 

And - I thought about Pete's comments on Mr Serious - and the Fonz!  he reminds me of the Great, Burt Reynolds:

51143625390_623b1ef032_b.jpg

 

How about that Burt Reynolds?  quite a guy..... 

 

I didn't give up on this guy as he will be so obvious.  I did more work on his face and hair, and again, I'm sorry about the darkness in the picture.  BTW, I didn't make his hair too much darker because I didn't want it to look like the journalist interviewing him!  Like all of these figures, the faces are tilted downward, which on one hand is likely more forgiving, but on the other, harder to clearly confirm what is going on!  I added more shade above his eyes, pink to his forehead (a prominent attribute of all three of these guys!), and some burnt umber to his eyebrows and moustache - the last brown color shade simply wasn't "reading", and looked more like a mistake.   If he weren't so serious, I'd give him bigger lapels - haha -

 

In addition to trying to ruin my figures, I'm in the process of trying the same on the shop floor and driveway.  I started by adding some AK engine oil enamel (in what, in retrospect, was clearly the wrong pattern) - which, when applied to a leaky engine, looks great.  Less great on a light grey, "concrete" floor, or a medium grey "asphalt" driveway.  I realized my incredible blunder immediately, which didn't have much to do with the color - and instead a fundamental step in model building, which is to model what something actually looks like and not what your (my) mind "thinks" it looks like.  Ugh, sort of a rookie move I'd say.  So, today, I'm dusting shades of grey via airbrush over the mess(es)  I've created.  I tried to obscure the mess a bit yesterday with: 1) pastels; no luck; and 2) washes of anthracite, which make it look less bad, but not good, yet.  On the other hand, vehicles will be parked over it - except you and I will know I screwed it up, so will at least try to fix it!  It will be fine, just a bit jarring to look at now.

 

OK gents, have a good day - 

 

Nick 

 

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Love the comparison pics...quite amazing resemblances :)

 

Acrylics and shine are common partners mate...and...funnily enough...many complain about the same with oils.

 

Thing is Nick...if I didn't know all this stuff after 40+ years of painting...well...might as well give up eh!

 

ATB

 

Ron

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Well Ron,  

I wish I'd have either figured that out, or read it somewhere before!  I always wondered why it happened, especially when using what is said to be "flat" or matte paint - of course, the base coat!  Just as I managed to figure out for myself, the color of the primer can change/tint the color of the base coat.  Again, seem obvious enough - figured it out panting the cowl and body of and F1 car - the body, received pink primer, with red base - the cowl, grey with the same red base.  The pink primer resulted in a decidedly warmer tone of red, than the grey base - happily, not a project that was that special to me, so learning experience more relevant than different shades of red!

 

OK guys, now, in what seems to be stepping away from subtlety, but really isn't.  Adding some grime to the concrete floor and asphalt driveway.  First a collection of prototype images:

 

51145711300_6d354979be_b.jpg

 

Well, once again, a guy is dumfounded by what he imagined an old concrete floor looks like, vs what it actually looks like....  First observation - the finish is almost glass like smooth.  How did I never really notice or should I say register that?  Next - the colors are not uniform, and are quite mottled.  There are tracks over repeated drive surfaces - and spilled fluids get absorbed, cleaned up (see third pic on top row with absorbent material), and leave a gradation of stained colors.  Or - there is more to this than there might seem to be!  Also, something I happen to know from "real" work - concrete reflects the color of the base aggregate used - above, a warm, light sand color, whereas I've seen conc with a red/orange tint, brown, and cool grey - so, at least that leave some latitude for variety. 

 

As noted above, I of course started in the wrong way, adding puddles and streaks of AK engine oil (lacquer) , which of course turned out nothing like the real thing.....The next photo shows my four steps in first making a mess, and what appeared to be a big mistake, concluding with something I like:

 

51145386474_4706d6797f_b.jpg

Line 1 - I ruined it - ample amounts of badly placed AK....perfect.  Added layers of pastel to tone down the "oil"...did not work - but did make more of a mess....haha

Line 2 - Hit with anthracite grey, shot from Krome airbrush - that is, limited, and to the extent practical, controlled dusting of key places

Line 3 - Added Barley grey dusting, then USAF Lt grey  - also w/ Krome

Line 4 - Wide brush painting of diluted Lifecolor Dust 1 over everything.

 

This was considerably more complicated than I expected.  I think it turned out to be so because of the sharp contrast in tone between the concrete shop floor and asphalt driveway, and large scale.    Whereas the "oil" I applied in step 1 would look like big ponds in 1/35, here, they looked strange, and nothing like dripping/spilled auto fluids.  Adding to this, it didn't look all that good on either surface - concrete or asphalt, which meant neither looked good, both needed to be blended, yet I wanted both to clearly look like intended - concrete and asphalt, and not some amalgamation of pavement.   Scale became a challenge because it was hard for me to tell how much of any top coat ("oil" or paint) was enough, and where it should go.

 

Regarding a smooth concrete surface - well, in the past I've use hydrocal, which is a hard plaster, same used on the foundation.  I find it hard to control on flat surfaces and it's heavy!  Next, believe it or not, using really thin sheets of plywood - this works a lot better than you might imagine.  If you keep track of your cut lines, they can look like concrete expansion joints, and with some practice, the results can be really nice, you can even scribe cracks/chips into it.  But, it is really expensive, so not ideal for a big dio.  The "concrete" here is thin cork roll, the type used to line shelving.  In the garage, where it is supposed to look like concrete (vs asphalt) I added a fine layer of "joint compound" (intended for use repairing sheetrock walls).  Well - not bad, but not smooth either.  As the cork is porous, I don't think it will ever look too smooth, no matter the amount of surface treatments I add.

 

Now, back to figures - maybe with some better light and on-going revisions:

 

51144828733_e7a0408ba1_h.jpg

 

Unhappily, I shot the images above at various stages of my "concrete stain repair", essentially to test success - but, they illustrate how the colors are coming together.  And, more on a few of the "stars" of our show:

 

51143929972_328c296ff2_c.jpg

 

Sorry these groupings are so small, they are screen shots from powerpoint!  I just couldn't abide dozens of individual pics!  I suspect you'd get sick of them too!  Hopefully you can though see that I haven't given up on them yet.  First, the gal in the light blue shirt - her face is fine - her hair! yeah...."plastic" blonde...I need to fix that - looks like the acrylic hair helmet.  The journalist - well, not bad - I've tried to lighten her face tone, to offset impact of cap! generally fine.   And, Mr Serious - more work! more pink in his forehead, more dark above his eyes, and more burnt umber on his moustache and eyebrows.  Funny enough, this lighting was very late in the day, maybe an hour before sunset, and the colors read better, than midday.

 

OK gents,  thanks for having a look - 

 

Cheers

Nick  

 

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