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1/12th scale Baker's Waggonette.


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Here’s another Horse Drawn Vehicle that I have made, it’s a 1/12th scale Bakers Waggonette.

 

It has taken me just over 6 months of graft to get it finished, sometimes life just gets in the way of a decent hobby, eh.

 

The original full sized vehicle is on display at the Redlands Museum in Cleveland, Qld.


This vehicle was originally used around the Redlands District for bread deliveries, see the first black & white photo, so it’s now back where it belongs, in the local Museum.


It has been reconditioned and given a ‘liquid overhaul’ many years ago by an expert carriage builder, by the name of Alex Hamilton.
Alex was the last of the old time carriage builders from around Brisbane, Qld.
His family had been Carriage-makers at Kedron, Qld for about a century,  his grandfather started the business,  then his father joined the business, so, Alex just had too follow along into the same business.

 

I had to do a series of drawings before I could start to make the model, I didn’t have a drawing similar, so plenty of photo’s and lot’s of measurements with a lot more time spent at the computer doing the drawings.

 

Mostly timber construction, with a few bits of acrylic used for the wheel fellies and I used Acrylic for the shafts as well. A lot of brass was used for most of the metal work, then a bit of steel turned down for the tyres and key-steel used for the axles.

 

All the nuts and bolts that hold the model together were ALL hand made, using bronzing rods for the 12BA coachbolts bolts and K & S square brass section ,for the 12BA nuts.

 

Paint is just ordinary enamel house paint and the decals are all done in house, using an ALPS MD 5500 printer,  printed onto clear decal paper, then cut from the decal sheet and applied to the model.

 

Each wheel has 63 decals added to it, so for the four wheels that’s 252 decals, don’t ask how many on the complete model as I have never bothered to count each and every one of them. It took me about a week, to put all the decals onto the model.


Once the decals had dried onto the model, then all the different sections were clear coated, then it was assembled very carefully.

 

Plenty of photo’s showing what medium’s I used for the construction and then lot’s more photos showing the finished model.

 

 The last two photos, are of the full sized vehicle at the Museum at Cleveland, Qld.

 

 

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Hope everyone enjoys these photos and any questions about anything on the model, them PLEASE ask.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Edited by radish1us
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I absolutely love this! Superb workmanship leading to a spectacular model.

15 hours ago, radish1us said:

any questions about anything on the model, them PLEASE ask.

Okay, here goes:

1. Acrylic for the fellies - can I ask how? 

2. The spokes look superb, but there are lots of them! I presume they are individually carved from timber, but what kind of wood and what process did you use to shape them?

3. Are the spokes simply glued to the fellies and hub?

4. What type of wood did you use for the body?

 

As a longtime plastic aircraft modeller I wanted to try something different, so through summer I acquired an old Picador Pup hobby lathe system specifically to try building horse-drawn farm vehicles from plans, and I've started to gather the brass rod and strip that I'll need. Unfortunately the ancient electric motor that came with the Picador parts expired before I could really get going, and an unexpected change to my professional routine hasn't helped. Once I acquire a decent motor, though, I'll be getting stuck in! 

 

I'll be starting with the simple wain from the plans in John Thompson's book, but one day I hope to be able to produce halfway decent farm wagons. In the meantime, though, I've just found my new favourite BM model.

 

15 hours ago, radish1us said:

sometimes life just gets in the way of a decent hobby, eh.

Oh boy, does it ever!

 

Jon

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7 minutes ago, Jonners said:

1. Acrylic for the fellies - can I ask how? 

2. The spokes look superb, but there are lots of them! I presume they are individually carved from timber, but what kind of wood and what process did you use to shape them?

3. Are the spokes simply glued to the fellies and hub?

4. What type of wood did you use for the body?

I've just found your gun & limber thread, @radish1us, which answers most of my questions, so I'll be giving it a good looking-at!

Jon

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  • 2 weeks later...

Hi @Jonners

 

FYI under the ‘vehicles’ ‘discussion’ @radish1us has posted a very good summary of three different ways he has used to make horse-drawn carriage wheels. I am not sure how to post a link at the moment as I am using a phone not a computer right now but I’m sure you will find it quickly  enough.

 

Steve

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2 hours ago, cngaero said:

That's a stunning model. How on earth did you pinstripe the wheels? 

Hi Chris, I use an ALPS MD5500 printer to make the decals that I slap onto the junk I make.

Have a very old Microsoft computer running Windows XP, using CorelDraw X4 which I use to make all the designs for the decals that go on the models.

I source any and all old style pinstriping that I can find on any old horse drawn vehicles, save it to the computer in photo's for future reference.

This way I can then use these reference photos, for the striping on any model that I might want to make in the future.

Try to do the same for old style lettering that you find on old horse drawn vehicles.

That way whatever striping, or lettering I put on any model, will be very similar to the old original style of pinstriping.

 

Back to the wheels on the Baker's Waggonette, each wheel, both front and rear, has 16 spokes, so a total of 63 decals have been applied to each wheel.

So for each individual spoke, you'll find it has 3 decals on it, one on the face and two for each side, multiply that by 16 for just the spokes on one wheel.

The fellies, or circles around the end of the spokes has four sections of the circular decal, to effin hard to put in place ONE circular decal.

Then 8 decals for the bolt head covers on the flange holding the spokes together, then three more decals wrapped around the flanges.

 

Total 63 per wheel, X 4 wheels equals 252 decals applied to only the wheels.

Want to try and count what is on the complete model  ? ------------------- Nope, neither do I. 🙂

Edited by radish1us
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