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Fiat 806 GP full-scratchbuild 1:6


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Hello
Before continuing with the photos from before, last night's work.
I had made a steering wheel with a non-compliant hub, so I redid it yesterday.
I cut out a round in aluminium, made the grooves on the lathe and then I drilled the 16 holes.

 

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Edited by Ghost69
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Thanks H
So I go on...

I'll just have to put the comfort ribbon on the steering wheel.

I'll have to find hexagon head screws 

 

 

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Edited by Ghost69
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Very nice steering wheel but I’d hope in this major scale you would machine those teeth around the inner wheel diameter.

 

Based on the ring of holes you have managed to drill very neatly, I reckon you have a dividing head so the teething shouldn’t be a major task, while it would make the steering wheel look ‘spectacular’ rather than ‘very nice’.

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You’re right, as I now see (typing my reactions on the phone, not having gone through the topic yet).

 

Realising this, I have to compliment once more for build and inventive quality; that said I’d much recommend you purchase a milling machine (with dividing head), a tool that should enable you to even improve on the already high quality of this build, taken into account the chosen scale.

 

Lathe and mill are, for scratchbuilding, yin and yang. 

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Thank you for your messages, it’s a pleasure to read you

 

On 15/11/2020 at 01:11, Codger said:

Between your work and Dan's my head is spinning...:frantic:

🤣🤣🤣🙃

 

On 15/11/2020 at 09:28, silver911 said:

Nice work indeed :)

 

Judging by the picture of the holes in the process of being drilled Roy...no dividing head in use or sight.

 

Ron

Yes Ron, Yes indeed my head of division is a simple school angle reporter 
I was thinking, "Roy must not have seen my picture." 

 

On 15/11/2020 at 09:42, Roy vd M. said:

...

Realising this, I have to compliment once more for build and inventive quality; that said I’d much recommend you purchase a milling machine (with dividing head), a tool that should enable you to even improve on the already high quality of this build, taken into account the chosen scale.

...

Indeed I think I buy all this...for the moment I think about what to buy myself.

Roy, Do you have a milling machine? If yes, you can tell me the model and the brand, it can serve as an idea.

 

 

I don’t know how to make such a narrow cut...I found a tiny, very thin saw blade, I tried and that’s okay.

In the photo, I count about 20 notches on one branch of the steering wheel and the next interval, which will make 80 notches.
This will make us a notch all 4.5°...to simplify I will test all 5° (360/5=72). Given the size of the hub, I don’t think we’ll see the difference and it’s easier to postpone an angle of 5 degrees

If that doesn’t work, I’ll close my hub later with a milling machine and a divider.

Edited by Ghost69
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Yes I have a Proxxon PF230 with Proxxon UT400 dividing head; but a lighter dividing head should be more than okay for most purposes. 

 

Unfortunately I can't show you any specific / relevant current pictures, as all tools are currently being cleaned externally due to smoke damage. 

 

In the following post you can see the Proxxon combination in action a few years ago, it may give you some ideas of its usability: 

 

To make the narrow cut, I'd try using a small diameter mill bit. Like this: 

 

 

This was the interim result (don't mind the grooves on the larger wheel or the rough teeth on the smaller, both wheels were yet to be finished): 

 

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For the steering wheel I'd use a smaller diameter mill bit. 

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Indeed, very small teeth. You could try finding the smallest cutting disk in existence, use that on the mill (using the dividing head to correctly align the cuts) and after that, manually use a needle file to V-shape each cut.

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I liked my plugs on the candles but a lug with a nut is usually what we had on racing cars of that time.
The nut on the lug will give a real look.

 

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Edited by Ghost69
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The button on the upper right spoke of the steering wheel was a switch for turning off the ignition completely.There must have been cables behind that spoke leading to the center of the wheel where the ignition could get adjusted.

The background: Some years ago a metal piece was blocking  the butterfly valve of the carburettor in an 805 driven by Bordino and caused permanent high revolutions of the engine.

If you press the clutch in this situation, the engine will explode in no time, therefore it´s safer to turn off the power.

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On 16/11/2020 at 01:21, Hannes said:

The button on the upper right spoke of the steering wheel was a switch for turning off the ignition completely.There must have been cables behind that spoke leading to the center of the wheel where the ignition could get adjusted.

....

Oh okay, thank you for that very interesting clarification. I had seen in a photo that there was one more thing on the ball but without trying to understand.
I’m going to remove my mounting screw and put a small piece of solid tube and 2 small wires behind the steering wheel branch.
thanks

Edited by Ghost69
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Today, photos concerning the manufacture of the bodywork.
It is made of fibreglass.
I first made a master in polystyrene, made the mould and then I "pulled" the bodyshell.
I made it thin to make it look like tin.

 

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Edited by Ghost69
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Thanks Pouln

I was a bit scared, I hadn't touched fibreglass for about 40 years.
I had to be careful that the resin didn't touch the polystyrene because it eats it. Wax and gelcoat was the right solution. I was lucky 

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Thanks Trevor.

 

The candles are modified and connected.
I wanted a driver in my car, so I had to make him a bonnet and glasses.

 

 

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Edited by Ghost69
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Brilliant coachwork Manu. And your driver is of excellent scale and realism to enhance the project. Your fabric tailoring is another skill unto itself. Quite a tour-de-force you're putting on for us. :phew:

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