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Building the 1/72 AZ models DH Hornet by David Collins


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A lovely model of a supremely attractive aircraft in a very attractive scheme.

 

Thank you David for this excellent tutorial on how to build the AZ Hornet: loads of good advice and information we wouldn't have got from anywhere else.  Still not totally won over by those spinners, to be honest, but you have shown us that it's still a decent-looking Hornet nonetheless. and better than anything that has gone before.  I haven't completely thawed towards this kit but shall probably have done so by the time the F.3 comes out!

 

Do those odd fairings under the outer wing come with the kit or did you have to knock them up yourself?  If the latter, do you have any decent reference pictures?

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3 hours ago, Seahawk said:

A lovely model of a supremely attractive aircraft in a very attractive scheme.

 

Thank you David for this excellent tutorial on how to build the AZ Hornet: loads of good advice and information we wouldn't have got from anywhere else.  Still not totally won over by those spinners, to be honest, but you have shown us that it's still a decent-looking Hornet nonetheless. and better than anything that has gone before.  I haven't completely thawed towards this kit but shall probably have done so by the time the F.3 comes out!

 

Do those odd fairings under the outer wing come with the kit or did you have to knock them up yourself?  If the latter, do you have any decent reference pictures?

 

Hi Seahawk,

Thanks for your reply.

The fairings under the wings I've added, have been cut down from the bomb carriers contained in the kit. I've added some reference photos here. You don't see them on every F.1, but in 1946-47 they appeared a lot. They look like a narrower version of the front third of the bomb fairing, but the F.1 was not equipped to carry rockets or bombs. 

 

IMG_20201129_131206_638

 

 

IMG_20201129_131248_592

 

 

 

Edited by David A Collins
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Hi David

 

Adding my thanks for your excellent Hornet tutorials, it seems that number of the AZ kit's missing details could be addressed with a small decal sheet ( under wing louvres, belly door options etc.). Perhaps a list of subjects could be compiled as you progress through the marks?

 

Les

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10 minutes ago, gunzo said:

Hi David

 

Adding my thanks for your excellent Hornet tutorials, it seems that number of the AZ kit's missing details could be addressed with a small decal sheet ( under wing louvres, belly door options etc.). Perhaps a list of subjects could be compiled as you progress through the marks?

 

Les

 

Hi Les,

Yes good idea. I'll summarise at the end of these builds.

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PR.2 build:

 

My standard 3mm removed from the floor ahead of the control column, to compensate for the angle of the instrument panels.

 

IMG_20201129_160835_616~4

 

IMG_20201129_161527_699~2

 

 

The same amount removed from the front end of the RH electrical console.

IMG_20201129_162423_375~3

 

 

IMG_20201129_162423_375~2

 

 

From this original photo of mine you can see the two belly mounted cameras of the PR.2 variant. Both point vertically downwards.

IMG_20201129_174749_424~2

 

 

The forward one is located in the space vacated by the ammunition boxes and cannon breeches. The rear one is located within the belly door opening.

 

Measuring from the green datum line, the first lens is 7.5mm and the second one 34mm. Each lens diameter is 3.5mm.

IMG_20201129_185710_971~3

 

The belly door went through some shape changes over the marks. For the RAF versions I have drawn the outline here. It's a rounded triangle.

 

The PR.2 uses the smooth fairing under the nose, as there aren't any cannons fitted. Also in the cockpit, you won't need the gunsite either.

 

 

Edited by David A Collins
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Wings on number two.

 

These really fly together the second time around.

 

The two camera lens ports have been scribed on the underside of the fuselage now. You could drill a 3-3.5mm hole for each and insert a lens, print a decal, or paint a round disc as I intend to do here. Any method would represent the cameras I guess. 

 

IMG_20201130_213635_491~2

 

 

IMG_20201130_213657_842~2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Edited by David A Collins
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Nice looking, but hardly a surprise!

 

Is the belly door just "service access", or did it serve some more particular purpose?

 

On your fighter, the photo of the subject seems to me to have somewhat lighter spinners than the Medium Sea Grey topside colour- and (by casual eyeball analysis) seems a similar shade to the identity letters, which seem not quite as "bright" as the white in the roundel.  Any comments?  (Not that I don't believe your choices, it just struck me when looking at the pics).

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10 hours ago, gingerbob said:

Nice looking, but hardly a surprise!

 

Is the belly door just "service access", or did it serve some more particular purpose?

 

On your fighter, the photo of the subject seems to me to have somewhat lighter spinners than the Medium Sea Grey topside colour- and (by casual eyeball analysis) seems a similar shade to the identity letters, which seem not quite as "bright" as the white in the roundel.  Any comments?  (Not that I don't believe your choices, it just struck me when looking at the pics).

 

Hi Gingerbob,

The belly door is for service access on all versions of the Hornet except for the Sea Hornet NF21. Here it provides crew access for the radar operator/observer.

 

Regarding your question about spinner colours. Personally I think different shades of grey are not a reliable source of colour. There are so many factors governing how the same colour appears lighter or darker on the same image: exposure; surface curvature; light source; clean versus dirty parts of the airframe.

 

I'll include a good example of PX386, when painted for the Elmdon Air races. The tail band colours appear very different in all of the photos taken of it. It was only through finding the original Aeroplane Magazine from 1948/49 that listed racing colours used by each competitor, that we were able to nail down what they actually are.

 

All I know for certain on the fighter Hornets early in their service life is that they were supplied to the squadrons with MSG spinners and upper surfaces, and PRU undersides.

 

Towards the end of the Hornet F1's use, some of the Squadrons started to apply different spinner colours to denote flights, the co's aircraft, and squadron. I'll update this reply with known markings for future reference.

Edited by David A Collins
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6 hours ago, gunzo said:

Hi David

 

Ref the belly doors; were they all the same shape apart from the larger one for the NF21?

 

les

 

Hi Les,

I'll have to get back to you on that. Simple answer is that there are several variations in the part drawings, but I need to check if they are related to specific marks or ongoing modifications.

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The PR.2 fuselage is complete now, with just the props, wheels and pitot tube to add.

 

Of note, are the kit decals. Although I chose to finish this in the scheme of PX216, only the serials and letter R were used. The fuselage roundel and fin flash are undersize, so larger examples from an Special Hobby kit were used instead.

 

As with the fighter version, this has been sprayed with satin paint for good decal application. When complete, they will get a Matt coat of varnish.

 

IMG_20201202_201324_764 

IMG_20201202_201336_977

 

IMG_20201202_201306_743

 

Underneath can be seen the two camera ports, unique to the PR.2 version.

 

IMG_20201202_201209_443

 

IMG_20201202_201121_697

 

 

Edited by David A Collins
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Why on earth would you ruin a beautiful design like that?  It would be no more powerful, 600lb heavier, slower, less manoeuvrable and in all likelihood stood inelegantly on its nose the first time the pilot even glanced at the brakes.

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47 minutes ago, Work In Progress said:

Why on earth would you ruin a beautiful design like that?  It would be no more powerful, 600lb heavier, slower, less manoeuvrable and in all likelihood stood inelegantly on its nose the first time the pilot even glanced at the brakes.

 

You're right. In fact deHavilland studied versions of the Hornet and Mosquito with Griffon engine's and came to exactly the same conclusions.

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1 hour ago, bigbadbadge said:

Hi David 

Wiw that was quick.  Great work on this and a beautiful PRU blue is the result.  A cracking model.  

Chris

 

Hi Chris,

It's the first time I've been able to get hold of an aerosol can of the correct BS381c PRU Blue colour. I can see my long shelf-bound-in-primer 1/48 Airfix PR.XIX Spitfire finally being completed now!

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Follow only a couple of hours work on this F.3 variant today, here are some progress photos and detail differences from the previous two builds.

 

The F3 Hornet was the version built in most numbers for the RAF. It started its service life as a UK  home defence fighter, amazingly holding its own in mock combat against the Vampire F3 and Meteor F4. By 1950 its role changed to low level intruder equipped with rockets and b0mbs. It was in this later mod state that many were sent overseas to see action in the Malayan crisis, with 33, 45, and 80 Squadrons.

 

Detail differences from earlier marks include the wider tailplane and dorsal fin extension, as well as the ability to carry stores on the wings.

IMG_20201205_200945_112

 

Just for the record, this is the angled instrument panel. I modified the kit parts to orient them correctly.

IMG_20201205_171409_117~2

 

Finally, here's a small but notable difference to the cockpit. The first photo shows the Prototype and F.1 instrument panels. No gunsite, no cockpit lighting and no shroud.

The text on the column selectric button reads "Guns, SAFE, Camera" depending on the switch position.

IMG_20201205_201343_828~2

 

The second photo shows an F.3 instrument panel. This has the Mk4E gyro gunsite, ranging controls on the throttle, a full shroud over the instrument panels, and UV cockpit lights. The text on the column selectric button reads "Guns, RP's & B0mbs, SAFE, Camera" depending on the switch position. 

 

Before I put the canopy on this one, I'll be adding a scratch built shroud and the kit gunsite.

IMG_20201205_201615_636~2

 

 

 

 

Edited by David A Collins
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This is the shroud I've made for the F.3. The slot in the top is to accept the gyro gunsite.

 

IMG_20201206_164552_008~2

 

It's been left unpainted here to highlight it's correct location with the gunsite in place. I'll paint it black before closing the canopy.

IMG_20201206_174115_908

 

 

 

 

Edited by David A Collins
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