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The World Owes Me A Living. Airspeed Horsa


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Just watched a b&w movie on Talking Pictures & apparently the film was classed as missing by the BFI National Archive. I'm wondering if this is one of the movies Talking Pictures had recently discovered as read in the paper a couple of months ago.

Close to the end of the film engineers were piecing together what looked very much like an un-painted bare wood prototype Airspeed Horsa. 

Had anyone else managed to get through seeing this film. If it wasn't for the aviation I wouldn't have watched it all the way through.

Was that actually a Horsa, or was it just made up for the movie?

 

Martin

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The Horsa appears near the beginning as well. The aircraft with ‘Dominion Airlines’ painted under the cockpit glazing and being loaded with crates through the rear parador is a Horsa. I notice the film was made with the assistance of de Havillands who by the time the film was made owned Airspeed which is why the Horsa was designed at Salisbury Hall.

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1 hour ago, Aeronut said:

The Horsa appears near the beginning as well. The aircraft with ‘Dominion Airlines’ painted under the cockpit glazing and being loaded with crates through the rear parador is a Horsa. I notice the film was made with the assistance of de Havillands who by the time the film was made owned Airspeed which is why the Horsa was designed at Salisbury Hall.

Yes, saw that at the beginning. Despite it being a dreary plot, the aviation theme kept me watching. 

Nice to see an Avro Avian as well, almost mistook it for a de Havilland DH.60 Moth.

That's what I thought, regarding de Havilland, knowing that they took over production. Would be interesting to know where that location was, showing that Horsa being put together.

I found that Talking Pictures had been advertising this showing for a few weeks. Might be the first time it's been seen since it originally came out at cinemas. Knowing them, it will be repeated a few more times.

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Did you notice how polymorphic the Avian was? Once in the air it turned into a Tiger Moth. Pity the film didn’t give credit to the person who first thought of idea of using gliders to carry cargo over long distances. Barbara Cartland, yes for it was she, needs to be remembered for more than just her books.

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22 minutes ago, Aeronut said:

Barbara Cartland, yes for it was she, needs to be remembered for more than just her books.

She did have an aircraft named in her honour

 

circa-1930-english-novelist-barbara-cart

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12 hours ago, Aeronut said:

Did you notice how polymorphic the Avian was? Once in the air it turned into a Tiger Moth. Pity the film didn’t give credit to the person who first thought of idea of using gliders to carry cargo over long distances. Barbara Cartland, yes for it was she, needs to be remembered for more than just her books.

Well I never knew that about good ol' Barbara! Maybe that lady character was based on her? 

I had noticed that about the Moth until I looked up the registration & found it was an Avian, if you looked quickly they are vaguely similar!

Wonder what other aviation feats Mrs Cartland got up to?

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