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Search and Rescue "Good Bye" Set 1/72 Revell (05683)


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Search and Rescue "Good Bye" Set

1/72 Revell (05683)

 

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For decades, the sea rescue cruisers of the Deutsche Gesellschaft zur Rettung Schiffbrüchiger (DGzRS) and the Sea King helicopters of the German Navy have been part of the Search and Rescue (SAR) service in all weather conditions on the North and Baltic Seas.

 

One of the most enduring aircraft of the post-war period, the Sikorsky SH-3 Sea King flew for the first time in 1959. Although no longer in production, the Sea King continues to serve with air arms around the world, including those of Canada, Germany India, Ireland, Italy, Spain and the United Kingdom. Just as they had done with earlier Sikorsky designs such as the S-55/H-19 Chickasaw (produced in the UK as the Whirlwind) and S-58 Choctaw (Wessex), Britain’s Westland Helicopters secure a licence to produce the Sea King not long after the aircraft made its first flight. Westland’s first variant was the anti-submarine HAS.1. This was followed by the heavily modified troop carrying version, initially produced as the Commando for the Egyptian Air Force, but also used by the Royal Navy where it was known as the HC4. Other UK produced Sea Kings included the HAR3/3A search and rescue helicopter, and Airborne Early Warning (AEW) variants. The Mk.41 Sea King depicted by Revell in this kit was the export version of the HAS.1 supplied to the German Navy in the mid-1970s.

 

The Berlin was operated by The Deutsche Gesellschaft zur Rettung Schiffbrüchiger (DGzRS) or German Maritime Search and Rescue Association. From 55 stations in the Baltic and on the North Sea Coast they operate a fleet of vessels for maritime Search and Rescue, It is financed entirely by donations.  The Berlin was in service from 1985 to 2017 and one of the most powerful sea rescue vessel with a Diesel power train developing 1200KW.  The vessel has since been replaced by a new one with the same name.

 

 

Search and Rescue Vessel "Berlin" 

Here Revell have re-boxed their 1988 kit of the Berlin. As well as the hull casting there are 6 sprues of white plastic and a clear sprue. The first thing to be built up is the supplied stand to display your model on. Next up on the lower hull rudders and propellers are added on. Now the hull can be flipped and the main deck attached. To this is added the main deck house is built up and added. To the top of this is added the bridge where the vessel is controlled from. Next up is the main mast which holds the antennas and radars. At the rear of this top deck the firefighting cannons are built up and added. On the fore deck the bulwarks go on and then railings on the top o them. The railings are straight and will have to be bent to shape using hot water. The rest of the railings and fenders go on down the sides. On the aft deck fittings go in place for the rear launched smaller rescue boat. Once all the fittings are in place the actual smaller boat can be built and added in. 

 

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One marking option is provided for on the decal sheet which is from Cartograf so there will be no issues with it. The option is for the Berlin, there are also declas for the stand.

 

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The Sea King

Here Revell have re-boxed their excellent kit, the SAR 45th Year boxing was released in 2012 and the tool is still good today. It is comprised of just over 150 parts moulded in light grey plastic. The kit is pretty modern, having been tooled in the late nineties. As such, it dates from a period during which Revell were enjoying something of a purple patch, churning out some outstanding kits in 1:72 scale such as their Panavia Tornado, McDonnell Douglas Phantom II and General Dynamics F-16 to name just three. The mouldings are clean and crisp and there do not appear to be any flaws in the plastic. Surface detail is comprised of fine, recessed panel lines and delicate, raised rivet detail, which replicates the skin of the Sea King very accurately.

 

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The kit is equipped with a well-appointed cockpit, comprised of the pilot’s and co-pilot’s seats, centre console, cyclic and collective controls and yaw control pedals. The rest of the cabin is equally nice and includes additional crew seats and folding passenger seats. There are a number of additional interior parts marked ‘not for use’ on the sprues that can be used to build other versions of the Sea King. The optional cabin windows are flashed over and so some plastic must be cut away in order to build the Mk. 41 depicted on the decal sheet. The choices don’t stop with the interior, however. Revell have provided plenty more options on the sprues. There is a choice of engine intake guards (including, of course, the option not to fit them at all) and five or six blade tail rotors. You also have the option of both the small upper fuselage radome and the larger radome fitted to the HAS.5/HU.5 and HAS.6. There are plenty of other options too, but you’ll need to pore over your sources if you have a particular aircraft in mind, as not all of them are dealt with in the instruction manual.

 

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The main rotor blades are of the later, composite type, but Revell have provided a diagram which shows you how to backdate them to the earlier, metal type. The rotor head is very nicely detailed. If I have one gripe with this kit, it’s that it doesn’t include the option to depict the rotors in the folded position without some surgery. This is by no means a deal breaker, but it would have been helpful, particularly as helicopters tend to take up a lot of space on the shelf! As an extra bonus, four Sea Skua anti-ship missiles have been provided as well. If you don’t want to use them when you build the kit, they will come in handy for the spares box.

 

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One marking option is provided for on the decal sheet which is from Cartograf so there will be no issues with it. The option is; Westland Sea King Mk.41 ’45 Jahre SAR’ of Marinefliegergeschwader 5, 2003; 

 

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Conclusion

A good chance to pick up both of these good kits from Revell in one box. Revell are also donating 1 Euro from each sale to the  DGzRS. Recommended. 

 

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Revell model kits are available from all good toy and model retailers. For further information visit

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  • Julien changed the title to Search and Rescue "Good Bye" Set 1/72 Revell (05683)
On 19/10/2020 at 20:11, John_W said:

 

Looking at the decal sheet, there appears to be two options, "Berlin" and "Herman Helms"?

True, they dont mention it in the instructions I seem to remember.

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Have seen this kit floating around on ebay for months now.  I'd love to buy it, but I don't want the boat, and I doubt I'd be able to sell it.  Wish Revell would re-pop the Sea King on it's own.

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