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Hello model builders - It's now Saturday, and I'd like nothing more than to get building, but not for a while.  Need to do some real work today for a few hours to stay ahead of the upcoming holidays.  While not ideal for the weekend, fine in the bigger scheme of things.  

 

@silver911 and @Kitkent thanks to both of you for sticking with me on this project!  Interesting too, between both of you at 1/20 - on one hand trying to reach the level of detail being done in 1/12 and on the other, keeping fine detail nice and clean like in the 1/43! Maybe I should pick one or the other and go from there! 😁

 

But, for now, have been working on odds and ends.  The sequence of assembly of this Lotus has been interesting and challenging.  It would be easy to put the proverbial cart before the horse and create a mess, by forcing it all together.  For example, the braided lines I'm using are metal, so, weaving them through painted parts, can cause them to sand paint off of those  parts - nice.  To avoid this, I've enjoyed the pursuit of other distractions between steps on the Lotus, like the beginning of a workbench and detailed up rear end:

 

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It would hardly be a revelation for me to announce that Tamiya kit parts are pretty detailed and clean.  That said, they are not always intended to be free standing objects, like this rear end.  Above one more odds and ends special - featuring the Tamiya base part, plus many sources for scratch building or kit bashing.  Styrene, metal and etched bolt heads - and so on.  The rear adapter place was a challenge, a piece of aluminum sheet progressively cut, filed and sanded to match the Tamiya part.  The front plate was from the junkbox, but a nice fit.  The inner workings on the front, same method as used on the clutch/flywheel.

 

From there, back to the car.  I realized that in my attempts to address my self imposed front cowl section challenge - well, sort of spaced on something relevant - like all four of the pivot struts for the upper control arms....nice.  So, back to the metal works to make some:

 

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It might be hard to understand what I'm describing - the parts are the four metal brackets running parallel to the out side, of the inner portion of the upper control arms.  Ha - I'm not sure if that tortured description helps much.  They are thin aluminum cut, bent, and then weathered - disaster averted!

 

Meanwhile, back in the engine shop, some more headway on one side of the DFV free standing engine:

 

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As a whole the Tamiya DFV kit seems to be pretty spot on, but, if you decide to look at it a bit more carefully, you'll find that depending on the version/era you want to build, there is room for change/enhancement.  After looking at photos of the real version of this engine, it seems there are some bits that can be updated on the valve heads. Not sure you can see what's been added (hard to see much contrast on my laptop), but if you can, you'll see a lip and bolt/large screws are added to the  outside edges of the valve head, and larger bracket and bolt/screw added to where the head attaches to the block.  While all of this has been very entertaining for me, as you'll see in the next photo - it will sure be tough to see when this is done:

 

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Yes!  the engine stand is now almost done, just needs touch up paint.  This part started as an axle jack - but, as F1 cars don't have solid axles - well, no reason to use it!  As with the other tools, the base is brass and aluminum.  To convert it to engine stand, you can see above - cut the base spine in half and inserted a brass square - btw - don't ask how tedious it was to get the tires/wheels resolve, take my word for it - it was!  And, for more context, with a scale figure who just flew in!

 

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While he looks appropriately serious, we need to get him a beer! - he needs to relax!  If you look between the engine and the stand you can see an adapter plate and studs which you use to bolt the two together while work is underway.  Interestingly, during my quest for photos, I saw a DFV engine on a stand like this, but it also had a forward mounted, adjustable "pole", for lack of a better term, to carry some portion of the weight I suppose? In any event, I might add one of those.  I've never seen a stand with that feature before, though it makes sense - I have seen some big block Chevy engines on stands and they certainly appear to be straining that connection.

 

And last but not least a bench grinder:

 

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Parts of this began life in a KFS 1/24 scale kit, but in this use, the motor looked sort of like a bench mounted Dremel grinder, which might be ideal for hobbyists, less so for a real car shop (in addition to being a different scale, the original part was intended for use in the bed of a recovery truck, so it was small to begin with)  All the caveats aside, the grinding wheels and shields look good.  Above you can see, I cut off and kept the original resin base, then used concentric sections of aluminum and styrene tubing to make a scale electric motor.  I don't own a lathe, so I use files to taper/round edges etc.  

 

So, when I get to and finish my real work, back to this!  

 

Thanks for having a look, and stay well - 

Cheers,

Nick

 

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I have to say Nick...your work is a real pleasure to follow and immerse myself in...none more so than all the tools...benches/stands etc. ...which are exceptional in their presentation of wear and weathering...bravo mate.

That figure is a nice addition...and...as a figure painter for 40+ years...it looks to me to have good casting and detail to work with...be interested to see what you do with him.

 

Good job all around Nick.

 

Ron

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Hello gents, 

 

Thanks for taking a look.  @silver911 ha! maybe next time an all workshop scratch build!  Glad you like the figure - he'll have some friends too.  I have not been painting figures for 40 years, lol - though 've painted my share in 1/35, this will be the first try at larger.  While I dreaded painting figures, not so much anymore, and have concluded its an important part of model building, like other parts and kits.  That said, I'm hardly confident about it - something of a fun challenge.  Several years ago, I was fortunate to have been essentially mentored by two fellows who were I suspect at, or close to, the highest level of figure modeling.  While my skill is nowhere near either of theirs, the insight and positive attitude they offered was great and something I still appreciate!

 

Ok, enough of a stroll down memory lane - back to this project.    It was bright an sunny early today, but I was working -  later in the day, I took the Lotus out.  The sun was lower in the sky, so no direct sunlight, but enough for an update.  I worked on finishing the engine and rear end, but took the front out too:

 

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While not ideal lighting, this allows the weathering to show - which is nice - this isn't supposed to be bright and shiny.

 

Regarding the motor, so far, I've only added a faint wash....yes, I'll add more:

 

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Hopefully, I'll attach the two later this week.  I just didn't have the time or enthusiasm to deal with the throttle linkage - it will go on, but I want to think about how to do it a bit more.

 

Meanwhile, and likely where my enthusiasm went, back to the free standing engine.  I finished the other end.  The pulleys are white metal, 1/24 scale blower pulleys, and they seem to work fine.  Less fine, or more complicated, was making the shroud in the center.  The assembly is small and awkward to hold.  Rather than wrestling with styrene, I used lead foil.  And while probably easier to shape than styrene, it was nerve wracking (and, still needs some cleanup) - have a look:

 

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And there you have it.  Thanks for having a look.

 

Cheers

Nick

 

 

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@Sabrejet  - thanks! and I completely agree with you.  It turns out, I really like the Studio27 full kit, and trans kit for the Tamiya Lotus.  It's too bad they don't seem to offer many other car types.  Funny you mention the shopping cart wheels - this project has required me to use lots of small tires and wheels. For the DFV, I was not at all sure about how to best represent those small pulleys.  My fall back solution was to use concentric aluminum tubes cut really short.  They are smaller than the typical 1/24 / 1/25 automotive pulleys, and these blower pulleys were just a lucky find.  Something else about them, unlike their turned aluminum counterparts, these are white metal and a lot expensive.

 

@Toftdale  thanks - and I appreciate your advice!   This started as the PC4 build - but, once it was 95% done, I ran into a painting failure - and decided to change the project direction, and now, we have multiple DFV builds and some odds and ends needed for a dio.  I don't know how to change the title, but I did add to the tags - thanks again - 

 

Cheers

Nick

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  • Stickframe changed the title to Studio27 PC4 and other DFV cars 1/20

Hello model builders,

 

Below are some updates - the free standing engine is done, and the Lotus assembled - as far as it will be for this project.  As is sometimes the case, I added all sorts of details to this engine - styrene, metal bits, connectors and so on - and yet, once finished, you can barely see them!  That said, have a look:

 

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I tired a few outside, but the sun was very low - anyway, here's one:

 

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I still need to add the throttle linkage, but I think that will be about it for this.

 

And, the Lotus - you've seen most of these parts, but unassembled - it's now assembled and has a throttle linkage:  

 

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I added another wash of NATO black, and that should be about it, but will make an adapter so the car will sit level on the rack.  

 

I'll add at least one more car - maybe a Tamyia Wolf Racing WR1 in some stage of disassembly (I found a photo of a similar car with the rear end remove and suspension dangling, which might be fun to try), or, should it ever arrive, the Wolf Models resin kit - right now, it seems to be lost in shipping.  I've been working on the dio too - building more tools, working on stabilizing the base (it was getting a bit wobbly) and installed the back wall.

 

One other note, for those of you interested in this vintage car with the DFV engine, I have the Hasegawa version of the Lotus in the stash.  I hadn't ever looked at the sprues, and it turns out, it comes with really nice engine details.  I just assumed it would use a copy of the Tamiya kit - and that was not too bright of me!  If I build the WR1 I might use the Hasegawa engine!

 

OK gents - stay well - 

Cheers

Nick

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Wow! Both engines and the Lotus are beautiful to look at,you're detailing is superb. I have made the Hasegawa Lotus 79 for someone else and  I remember reading that it was superior to the Tamiya version. Can't remember where or how now obviously. 

Have a happy  new year Nick from Chris. 

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If I may Nick...and this in no way a criticism of your superb work...merely a suggestion which you may feel free to ignore...rather than pure black for your washes...try a dark grey + a small amount of brown instead.

There are no fuel/oil/dirt residues that are black in reality...and...IMHO...especially in this scale...black looks too harsh...and tends to hide rather than hi lite details.

Just my personal thoughts.

 

Ron

 

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@Kitkent  Hi Chris, and thanks very much! Hope you and yours have a great new year!   As for the Hasegawa kit, if I wind up getting into the engine, I'll share the sprue compared to the Tamiya parts.  What caught my eye was that the Hasegawa kit includes the clutch detail - that I just spent too much time scratch building - haha - perfect!  But, this detail would be ideal if I go for the idea of a car with the rear end removed and suspension dangling.  

 

@silver911  Hi Ron, thanks for sharing your thoughts on this, I really appreciate it.  Your observation could well reflect the point I was wondering about - that much of the little detail I added was "lost" visually.  I used the NATO black mostly because it dries flat. In the past, I've used anthracite grey, which also dries flat, but I thought was too subtle - maybe not?  I wonder, I might mix the grey with some shade of brown as you suggest next time around?  I try to use a heavily diluted wash (using Vallejo Model Air paint) and add several layers.  Again, I appreciate you sharing your thoughts on this - and will give it a try next time through.

 

Before I get into another kit, I need to (haha - "need to" - this is a hobby!) make and install a throttle linkage to the free standing engine.  I'm also fooling around with the dio, taking on a few non-visible problems, like strengthening the base, and other more apparent steps, like attaching the rear wall.

 

Thanks for having a look

 

Cheers

Nick

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It's worth remembering that there are no 'true' blacks in nature...only in the modellers world :)

As you will be aware by now...my primary medium is oil paint...one of the key reasons being it's flexibility of uses...the best of those being 'glazes' and washes...far superior to acrylics or...indeed...any off the shelf product.

You can use white spirit/turps or artists odorless thinners...with their superior colour mixing atributes being of great advantage...especially for washes...whilst not 100% matt all the time if applied neat...if you soak out the oil on a piece of card before thinning...then they will dry matt.

Also...for washes alone...you don't need the 'artist' grade...so a cheap box set of basic colours is all you will need...something along these lines will serve you well.....

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Artists-Oil-Paints-Painting-Set-Painters-Colours-Tubes-Pictures-Supply-Kit/303295061980?_trkparms=aid%3D1110006%26algo%3DHOMESPLICE.SIM%26ao%3D1%26asc%3D20201210111314%26meid%3D99ebb67bbfc049728d42db324cefadf7%26pid%3D101195%26rk%3D1%26rkt%3D12%26mehot%3Dpf%26sd%3D203042215634%26itm%3D303295061980%26pmt%3D1%26noa%3D0%26pg%3D2047675%26algv%3DSimplAMLv5PairwiseWebWithDarwoV3BBEV2b%26brand%3DUnbranded&_trksid=p2047675.c101195.m1851

They can be applied over acrylics with no harm to them...and like acrylic washes...you can apply more layers if you wish...with adjustments to the mix made between layers with no ill effects.

Just a few thoughts for you mate.

 

Ron

 

Edited by silver911
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Hi Ron,

 

Thank you for the suggestion - I might just follow up on trying to use oils.  Looking back on the photos, I think I understand your point about the "black" being too strong for something this scale.  While there are some areas where I like the contrast (like in cooling fins), there are other places where the black muddles up/blurs the details.   On the Lotus, I wanted the base silver to be knocked back to suggest oxidation/weathering, but, in some places it's too much.  And on the motors....just too much, too dark.  It's interesting, as the block on both engines was a good representation of the muted silver grey, but, my wash made it look too dark, and much of the tone of the color is lost.

 

I had a good friend who was an excellent model builder and figure painter (likely like you!) and he always used oils, and the results were remarkable.  A few years ago, I built the dio below, depicting a scene in Afghanistan.  My friend was very ill at the time, yet was kind enough to build a few figures for the scene, military and civilian.  While I am proud of the diorama, the figures he made are the shining stars of this project.  As you mentioned your experience with figures, maybe you'll enjoy seeing these:

 

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This soldier is petting a small cat and is the star of the project - 

 

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I had an acquaintance at the time who was serving in the Corps of Engineers, who inspired the idea, and told me about the equipment in use.  

 

Ok  - enough of a stroll down memory lane and back to race cars!  Seems there are plenty of good reasons to figure out how to use oils to enhance the colors of engines!

 

Cheers

Nick

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Thanks, Ron - yes, I'm rereading your Renault post, where on page 2, you provide a very clear overview of your process which is helpful.  I'll reread it a couple of times to see if I actually "get" what you are describing!  Is it true that oils dry slowly?  I have read this before, but I wonder if "slow" is relative?  A few minute? hours? days? and if it does take a long time, it will be interesting to figure out how to interpret the success or failure of the work along the way?  The acrylic washes I use are very thin, so you can keep adding - as demonstrated by impatient me!!  lol 😁

 

thanks again - 

 

Nick

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Oils are slower drying than most mediums if used full strength (straight from the tube) and in a thick layer...indeed...way back when...it was generally accepted that oils could take up to a year to dry completely!...however...fast forward to today and the advent of better 'carriers and binders' and that is no longer the case...withe general rule of thumb being that  darker colours dry faster than lighter ones (dark overnight.....light 2-3 days) per full strength application.

It was during my years as a figure painter that...like many others...I found their slow drying times to be as big a pain as it was an advantage...the advantage being you could return to areas of a piece and continue blending and shading etc.

Me being me...who enjoys breaking the rules...I began experimenting with different ways of application that would shorten the drying time overall...and what you see in my techniques now...are the results of many such experiments...and many years of trial and error.

 

With that out of the way...some direct answers to your question which...hopefully...will give you a better idea of how you can include them in your arsenal of tools and tricks should you wish to.

 

First off...and probably most applicable to your needs...'washes' (pin or whole)...here you are governed only by how long the thinner (white spirit or turps) takes to evaporate/dry...and this has a lot to do with the ambient temperature...and the size of the area it is applied to...average in a warm room 20-30 minutes...after which you can apply another layer if needed or...if you wish to alter the colour slightly...and this reveals a great advantage with oils...their translucency is perfect for creating subtle colour changes...unlike acrylics/enamels which are opaque.

Keep in mind that you can use another advantage of oils...in that they leave a stain...even after being wiped off...this allows you to subtly alter shades of metals...to introduce effects such as fuel/oil and grime with very little effort.

In the scale you are currently working in...this should provide you with a lot of ideas and uses.

 

Ron

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Hi Ron,

 

Thanks for the tips.  Now I'm interested in trying some oils, and think I might have figured out a way to make some test runs that I can use in the dio!  If you scroll up the page, you'll see a rear end that I detailed, and it turns out, I have a couple of those, and a spare engine or two.  I'm thinking I might be able to use these as test cases - the upside, if the part looks great, it can have a prominent location on a workbench, if not, a less prominent home hidden among the odds and ends found in a shop. 

 

This would work well for me as I need to paint the parts anyway, good test subjects, not a highly detailed piece that I want to be highly visible.  In addition to the engines and trans, I have some left over suspension parts, so all sorts of surfaces to try this on.  Hmmm, I like this idea - a quick run to the local art shop seems in order (likely not picking up black!), maybe a few shades of grey, and some white, burnt umber, blue, yellow, orange.   These colors have worked pretty well with acrylics, ha, or just pick up a mix set as you already suggested!! 

 

Typically I use Tamiya fine grey primer, then Vallejo Metal for the base, with various blends of Model Air to get colors tuned in a bit.  In this case, I'd essentially do the same, until it came time to fine tuning the colors and to show some use. I think the oils might be the way to go.  As the saying goes, nothing ventured nothing gained.

 

Cheers

Nick

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Hi Nick...reason I suggested a 'starter' set was mainly the cost factor (cheaper)...it will usually include a black and a white...allowing you to mix your own grey's (cheaper than buying a few)...mixing colours is an integral part of working with oils...I rarely use a single shade/colour.

The parts you mention having would indeed be ideal for practicing on...also...please don't be fooled into buying 'artist's' white spirit or turps...not worth the cost...cheapest is plenty good enough.

Have a play and shout if you have any questions.

 

Enjoy :)

 

Ron

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  • 2 weeks later...

Hello gents, 

 

I have not forgotten about this project, but have recently been focused on the dio part - I decided to open up a post in the Dio section, as I don't want to push my luck with non-auto parts of the build!  Installing, grime, leaves etc:

 

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So, progress is being made.

 

I plan to use the great advice Ron has shared about oils and weathering - I'm really looking forward to giving that a go!  

 

In the meantime, I have been distracted by a different "shiny object" of an idea - brought forward by @Jo NZ - how about adding a monocoque to the debris heap - behind the barrels shown above....well.  I was planning to add remnant bits in that area, but a discarded monocoque - that is an idea. I could use a plastic kit part, and detail it up, or, how about trying to make my own out of aluminum sheet?  I did some reading on how they are made and decided yes - sounds like a good challenge. 

 

Unhappily for me I don't have any shop drawings, no racecar maintenance/construction experience, and only the hand tools of the hobby - files, knives, files, pliers, pin vice etc.  - so, here we go:

 

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Above you can see how it went together.  The hull is .032" alu sheet, as are a few ribs, while the rest is .016" alu, and some lead foil.  Well - the process, in some ways is just like regular scratch work with styrene, but, different in a few key ways.  First, it's hard to cut inner curves with my basic tools, which can easily modify styrene.  Next, on the plus side, if you scribe cuts, you can make full parts out of single sheet, by carefully bending along them, like done on the hull and shock towers.  This creates a nice solid structure, unless of course you drop it on the concrete floor a few times along the way, which can both dent parts and snap CA joints free (take my word for it), unlike gluing styrene....so, don't drop it along the way!

 

50849985783_f97d03ba93_c.jpg

 

This is a small section of the front cowl.  I stretched three or four pieces of Tamiya tape over a kit part, traced it carefully, then stuck onto a sheet of aluminum sheet, and began punching, drilling, carving, and filing.  The complete part was cut our after the modifications were done (the hole in the center, rivet holes), so that they could be made while on a relatively stable piece of material.  Otherwise, the parts are small, hard to hold, and easy to bend.

 

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After my earlier attempt at a similar part, and Ron's providing me a source for really small rivets, I decided to try again.  That's a .7 mm pencil - those rivets are small, requiring a #78 drill bit.

 

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Both installed - 

 

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I stuck with a mirror design build process, make part A left, then part A right - that way I could remember what I did, and could duplicate it (well, get close) on both sides.

 

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Above, is the prototype, and below, the build:

 

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The bulkhead/fuel cell behind the driver area is one piece of alu sheet.  Unhappily for me, the part in real life might look basically square, but it isn't.  It tapers forward and twice on the sides, all while sitting flush on the hull.  I did manage to do it all in one try, but it was slow going.  The interior joints are reinforced with lead foil.  I predrilled all the rivet holes, but they were redrilled several times along the way to clear out filing and sanding debris mixed with CA....nice.  Each rivet hole head was then countersunk with a larger diameter bit.  You'll see above, in some places rivets are installed and others clear holes left  - to suggest the rivets were drilled out during a tear down.   

 

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And that's all I'm building on this, and started painting it today.  First, the black area in the front, then the rivets, then, on with weathering.  I'm confident this is not accurate (tho I'm pleased with how close it is), but represents something ideal for my purpose, ideal for my scrap heap.  Ok, on to weathering - 

 

Thanks for having a look - 

 

Cheers and stay well - 

 

Nick

 

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So many things to enjoy when you look at all you are producing :)

In terms of 'accuracy' it all works fine to my eyes...a stunning effort in all areas...one that speaks well for the talent of it's creator...and the devil's in the details.

This is a superb scene...with a real story behind it...a glimpse of days gone by.

Enjoying seeing this evolve with each update.

 

Ron

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@silver911, Hi Ron, thanks very much - and glad you are enjoying seeing this move along too!

 

Below, with some damage:

 

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And there you have it.  The nature and extent of the damage was discussed on the dio post.   I concluded that, no, I am not about to rebuild the whole thing in order to make it more suitable for heavy damage, like bowing it in middle, instead, just a hard impact on a barrier of some kind.   If you look carefully, you'll see smashed up alu honecomd in the firewall - it turns out that by the 70's structural alu honecomb mesh, and rubber fuel cell/bladders were in use, so, big dent, but, in this case, no fire.

 

OK gents, thanks for having a look - I'll post more as it progresses! 

 

Cheers and stay well, 

Nick

 

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Hello guys,

 

Time to start a new build - this time, the Tamiya Wolf WR1.  It's the appropriate vintage, and of course includes the DFV engine!

 

Before starting, it was obvious, the bench needed to be cleaned up:

 

50878333673_c5975c46ce_c.jpg

 

Now, that's better!  A respectable place to carry out the essential task of building models! haha - On we go.

 

First up, take a look at the difference between Hasegawa (left) back-of-block/heads, and the Tamiya (right):

 

50879139387_f869137c4c_b.jpg

 

I really wish I'd have looked at this before I went about scratch building this for the free standing engine - well - I didn't, but because it's so nice, I'm going to build this car, also in the shop, with the rear end torn off with bits of suspension either dangling, or sitting nearby - haven't decided yet.  Next, the Tamiya firewall, nothing too special, which, in fairness, when built in most cases would be hardly visible:

 

50879036921_d542b5d1dd_b.jpg

 

In addition to being a bit dull, and blessed with a variety of sink marks, the locating points for the swing arms don't seem to match the real deal, and the brackets for mounting swing arms, have been grossly simplified - again, likely no big deal in most cases.  For this build though, some changes were called for:

 

50879036901_094e7fc22b_b.jpg

 

You can see, a variety of modifications made - some pretty simple, like the mounting holes next to the clutch etc, and a few others.  I used the Tamiya fuel rack, rather than the Hasegawa, because the fuel injectors (not mounted yet) look more realistic.  This required a fairly easy adaptation.  Next, on the firewall, lead foil and small rivets to match the "real" car.  

 

50879036881_8b52eff7d4_b.jpg

 

 

50879139327_32ea7870c4_b.jpg

 

 

50879139312_e84ae46d54_b.jpg

 

At this point, I'm not about to go out and spend more money on this project, so the various bits you see are just remnants of one sort or other - but they seem to do the trick.  I'm not sure about attaching the swing arms to the firewall - use few tiny eyebolts, or just make some from styrene or thin metal?  The quality of the cam covers is just OK, but, someone was nice enough to give them to me, so they are perfect!  I'm going to do some experimenting with their color, not the standard crisp black, a bit more faded.  

 

There won't be painting this week - it's rainy, so, will focus on building.  I'll drill out and install the injectors, get the distributor and fuel pump prepared, and add some more tubing.  

 

Cheers and stay well - 

Nick

Edited by Stickframe
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