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Thanks again for the comments chaps.

 

5 hours ago, sanfrandragon said:

really unusual scheme that must have been difficult to achieve, I wonder what was the point of it?

The aircraft was a trainer, so the scheme was probably for visibility.

 

5 hours ago, sanfrandragon said:

The wood finish round the cockpit is lovely, is it a decal or paint effect?

It's done with paint. A pale wood base coat, then a darker brown acrylic brushed over and wiped off with a sponge to create the grain

 

Wingnut+Wings+Sopwith+Pup+Gnome+Build+21

 

Andy:cat:

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That is truly outstanding. It would be so if you were familiar with modelling biplanes, it's even more so as a first attempt!

Absolutely gorgeous!

 

Ian

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Wow, Andy, just simply Wow!!

 

That is one of the best finished WnW kits that I have seen on here and quite possibly one of the very best model aircraft I've ever seen. It could easily have been the original aircraft photographed in a studio setting and no-one would be any wiser.

 

Anyway, there are few superlatives, certainly none that I can think of, that would do your work justice.

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Oh boy what a stunning model, the paintwork is superb alongvwith the fabric and weathering effects.  What an impressive model to have in your display. 

Amazing work 

Chris 

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17 minutes ago, mackem01 said:

Do the WnW tell you what unit it was serving with at the time??

It was at the School of Special Flying, at Gosport, where the system of flying training we all use today was pretty well invented. It is worth looking into the work they did (and the lives they saved) under Robert Smith Barry. Instructors were allowed their own aircraft to hone their skills, as if the instructors could not fly to the edge of the envelope, how could they teach pilots to avoid it safely. This Pup was used by Harold Balfour who became Secretary of State for Air in World War Two.

 

It is a great model of a surprisingly significant aeroplane. 
 

much better than my attempt....

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On 26 September 2020 at 3:25 PM, Andy Moore said:

Thanks again for the comments chaps.

 

The aircraft was a trainer, so the scheme was probably for visibility.

 

It's done with paint. A pale wood base coat, then a darker brown acrylic brushed over and wiped off with a sponge to create the grain

 

Wingnut+Wings+Sopwith+Pup+Gnome+Build+21

 

Andy:cat:

It looks great, I usually go for oil on an acrylic base coat, but I might try your method next time as it would dry a lot quicker. The leather trim on the cockpit edge also looks good, any tips there if I may ask?

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39 minutes ago, sanfrandragon said:

It looks great, I usually go for oil on an acrylic base coat, but I might try your method next time as it would dry a lot quicker. The leather trim on the cockpit edge also looks good, any tips there if I may ask?

Thanks, the acrylics are definitely quicker to work with, and a far less delicate one dry.  They're quite blendable too if you add a little drying retarder or glaze medium.

The leather trim is just a thinned coat of Vallejo Cavelry Brown over the base coat I'd applied for the wood. Later on I added an enamel pin wash around the stitching to bring out the detail more.

 

Andy:cat:

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  • 4 weeks later...

Wow!  That is seriously excellent!

I haven't built a bi-plane yet, but when I do I'm sure it won't reflect this type of perfection.

Awesome skill and technique! 😮:clap2::clap2:

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