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In the interests of some light entertainment I dug this out

P1110356

 

P1110353

 

Now there have been some excellent builds of this craft so I thought I'd go with a twist

 

Found these pics on Alamy. Great if you're looking for references

HNRR96

 

HNRR92

 

HNRR95

 

P1110358

 

No arguments on it being over weathered...

 

Stay safe

 

Kev

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So are you going for the whole left to the elements look cos there wont be much left of the kit. :hmmm:

 

Stay Safe 

beefy 

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That's the way I'm thinking at this moment.

Not sure if it's going to be possible to take a plastic kit to this state. The problem of course is the thickness of the plastic 

:hmmm:

Re canning I see two possibilities. A la beefy I.e. a stiff talking to with a dremel. Or build a frame on top and skim the surface with foil. A method I  saw sometime ago in a Tamiya mag. 

 

Then there's is the problem of the inner skin and exposed frames.    

 

Might need to do some experiments 

 

Stay safe 

Kev

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Don't know if this is any use Kev, but here are some pictures I took a few years ago of the landing craft that is preserved (sort of, not very well) just outside Calais in the D day museum there.  The rust patterns may assist, I have larger copies if they may help

 

landing craft

 

Cheers

 

Steve

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4 hours ago, longshanks said:

That's the way I'm thinking at this moment.

Not sure if it's going to be possible to take a plastic kit to this state. The problem of course is the thickness of the plastic 

:hmmm:

Re canning I see two possibilities. A la beefy I.e. a stiff talking to with a dremel. Or build a frame on top and skim the surface with foil. A method I  saw sometime ago in a Tamiya mag. 

 

Then there's is the problem of the inner skin and exposed frames.    

 

Might need to do some experiments 

 

Stay safe 

Kev

I think I remember that article not sure if I still have the magazine will try and dig it out.

 

building a skeleton and covering would be best I think but then I would love to see what you do with that  :wicked:

 

Stay Safe

beefy

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1 hour ago, beefy66 said:

Or build a frame on top and skim the surface with foil.

Kev, You could try it with 0.1 mm aluminium, I've used it a lot.  Easier than foil as its stiff and it cuts with a knife.  You can frame with the same material and it will provide slight curvature between the frames, not expensive

 

https://modelshop.co.uk/Shop/Raw-Materials/Metal/Item/Aluminium-sheet/ITM1055

 

Just a thought

 

Steve

 

 

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5 hours ago, Steve D said:

Don't know if this is any use

 

Thanks for the ref pics Steve, always helpful.

You read my mind.... that's what I was intending. Not sure what thicknesses it is at the moment. Interesting to see the do different thicknesses'

 

2 hours ago, beefy66 said:

I would love to see what you do with that  :wicked:

 

:hmmm:   :analintruder:  :wink:

 

A long shot, I don't suppose anyone has any pics/drawings of the frame construction  of the LCM

 

Stay safe

 

Kev

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3 hours ago, longshanks said:

pics/drawings of the frame construction  of the LCM

This is all I could find of the LCM(3), not really frame details I'm afraid (from Design of British Warships Vol 3) but having a scale drawing might help as a start

 

LCM

 

Steve

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BTW, the next page states that the side plating is 15lb, which if I remember correctly from my engineering days (1 cubic inch of steel weighs 0.283 lb) means the plating is 3/8ths thick or 0.12mm at 1/76th scale

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WOW John some cracking stuff in that link that has just reminded me I have something from that museum in New Orleans a gift from my daughter about 15 years ago now when she did a leadership summer at camp america

The pacific was not a nice place to be at that time  :poppy: and we must never forget.

 

beefy

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3 hours ago, Steve D said:

means the plating is 3/8ths

Thanks for that. Confirms my guess at 10mm thick.

 

3 hours ago, Steve D said:

I've scaled it to 1/76 and it fits nicely on a A4 so if you would like a pdf, at the right size, just ask

Yes Please. I'll PM you my email address.

 

2 hours ago, JohnWS said:

Here's a link to a website describing Higgins Industries WWII war effort.

Cheers John. Loads of interesting stuff on there......

 

Whilst were on plating ,the conning position was armoured with 6mm High Tensile Steel. My question would this be less prone to rusting than the material used for sides etc

 

Stay safe and avoid Humans 

 

Kev

 

 

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IIUC, yes, HTS is more corrosion resistant than mild steel. While there may be other relevant factors, your photos above are consistent with that.

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Been doing some experimentation on the Canning

 

1. Dremel, Tamiya glue & Mr Surfacer 500

P1110361

 

2.  Frame 0.4 x 0.75mm overlaid with 0.05 foil

P1110360

 

Frame layout this one 0.25 x 0.5mm. Used on no's 3,4 & 5

P1110359

 

1.

P1110362

 

2.

P1110363

 

Right to left

3. .25 x .5mm frame and foil

4. .25 x .5mm frame and kitchen foil

5. .25 x .5mm frame and 0.1mm plastic card

P1110364

 

P1110365

 

P1110366

 

At this moment I think I'm favouring developing no 3.

 

Any got any thoughts??

 

Stay safe and avoid numpties 

 

Kev

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No 3 is good and certainly better than 4 I think, but I do like 5 as well.

 

Looking back at the original rusting reference pic, you could even mix methods to obtain a good result.

 

All very creative I must say!

 

Terry

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Kev,

 

Nice work on preparing the samples.  Looking at the following photo, I'm thinking a combination of #3 & #5 - #5 for the sides & ramp and #3 where the most damage is at the midsection and near the bow.

 

50353109467_17996798e5_b.jpg

 

Thanks for asking.

 

John

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I would go a mix of 5# and 4# because 3# had to many burs showing on the outside unlike the damaged areas of your photos that show the metal curving in over

 

Just my 2 pennies worth

 

Stay Safe

beefy

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This is a most fascinating project, which I shall, of course support with my customary vigour. It kind of reminds me of an idea I have been toying with for some time now. It occurs to me that many of these craft and Higgins Boats must have been sold off after the war for civillian use and something along these lines might make an interesting project.

 

Martian 👽

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Hi Folks

Thanks for your thoughts/inputs much appreciated

 

I'm currently working on the Mk2, trying to incorporate the various ideas and framing.

One decision I have made. It will not be an exact replica of the above pics, not unless I can figure out how to work with lace.

It's a wonder some parts are still standing :shrug:

 

Stay safe and avoid numpties

 

Kev

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Mk 2

 

Building internal frames under face frames

P1110369

 

P1110370

 

P1110373

 

P1110371

 

P1110374

 

Getting a lot closer. Note the amount of depression decreases further up the plate. Still some burring showing on the macro.

 Your thoughts/suggestions??

 

Avoid numpties and stay safe

 

Kev

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Yes, the burrs are inconsistent with a corroded plate. This looks like plastic sheet. Perhaps if you tried a wire wheel on that Al sheet you showed earlier? If the foil is thin enough, you might be able to abrade the material away.

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