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Here is one I finished up last weekend and had running  as a WIP over in the diorama section . Its Takom's 1:35 St Chamond (early) . See the thread here

 

Nice kit only it was haniging around the shelf of doom for 3 years till a picture of Sitting Bull fell onto it ..... long story 

 

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hope you enjoy it

Regards 

Brian 

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French WW1 AFV were certainly colourful, despite earlier British experience that the Solomon schemes were ineffectual.  But they were highly unlikely to have been spray-painted as that technology was in its infancy in WW1.  Hard-edged brush painting would be normal, if not universal.

 

While artists' airbrushes existed for use with inks at that time and spraying had been used for (thin) whitewash for some time, the consistency of paints in the WW1 era really precluded spraying and industrial paint spraying was almost unknown.  It did not become commonplace until the arrival of less dense evaporating-solvent-based paint types such as nitrocellulose enamels in the 1930s.  That being said, the US Army apparently had "blow guns" for paint before the end of WW1 - possibly the type used for whitewash.

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Thank you. 

I am aware this is a result which speaks more to the aesthetics of modern armour modelling than an authentic historical representation of the subject matter. I am also very glad nobody  nitpicked about the fact that the colour scheme bears no resemblance to ‘Fantomas’ as I followed the Takom paint scheme instructions reasonably closely. The person who made the instructions obviously never looked at a photo of the tank.

 

When I did look at the photos, I was struck by the very diffuse nature of the scheme which was painted by hand as you correctly pointed out. Maybe it’s the grey tone of these old photos exaggerating the effect, but early St. Chamond tanks give me the impression of having complex and diffuse paint patterns and that is what attracted me to the subject and that is what I wanted to recreate.  That and the wonderfully awkward shape of the tank.

 

And I am glad to hear you like it so much.  :)  

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Great inclined placement of the tank on the diorama, the shape of this awesome vehicle lends itself very well for this. You've captured a certain emerging drama in the composition. I love colourfull paint schemes such as this one and even within the colours you've added variation. Great work,

Cheers,

Ernst.

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14 hours ago, Buzby061 said:

Very nice indeed. I've often toyed with the idea of getting one.

 

Pete

Pete 

Its a very nice if fiddly kit but if you take your time it will be fine.

 

This was my first Takom kit and I am impressed. I have since built some of their Panhard AmL 90 and 60 kits  and they were great. 

I would be curious to know what the relationship if any is to the Hobbyboss kit of the later St Chamond. 

Regards 

Brian 

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Hi,

for any Frenchman interested in WW1, the St Chamond is an iconic tank. God knows what it must have felt like to take any of those brutes into battle!

I love your diorama and I love your paintwork!!!

 

Congrats are in order!

JR.

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