Jump to content

Making 1966 E-type coupe (I hope)


Recommended Posts

Hi Paul .... Thanks for the heads-up.  I haven't looked closely at the front of the bonnet yet.  But I do plan on adding all the inner panels, so I'll probably hack away at the headlamps as well.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Once I got all the diagonal subframe stringers placed, it became obvious that the kit did not accurately model the underbody plates (which are removable in the real car, but I will keep them fixed).

 

spacer.pngspacer.png

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

Added the radiator fan motor bracket, the rear engine mount bracket and a bracket on the right firewall that actually isn't used for anything on the USA spec cars.  Painted the aluminum parts of the engine.  Sump fins turned out pretty convincing.

 

spacer.pngspacer.png

 

 

 

 

 

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

Just found this and very impressive it is so far! I can totally relate to modelling your own car as I owned a 1972 MGB in the 90's and recently picked up a kit to model it.

The closest I got to an E-Type was a test drive of a '66 roadster which I really wanted back in '85. Needless to say I never got it....

Still yearning.....

 

Ian

Link to post
Share on other sites

That front subframe looks really accurate and realistic - I hope I can get mine to look even half as good when I get around to working on it again...

Link to post
Share on other sites

The e-type has a cylindrical cannister called a reservac mounted on the left kick panel that store manifold vacuum so you can get two or three boosted brake applications even if the engine dies.  It is only accessible from underneath, hence the D-shaped opening in the under panel.  Not included in the kit, so I had to make one from wood and plastic.

 

spacer.pngspacer.png

 

 

  • Like 4
Link to post
Share on other sites

First color coat and added the brake booster/master cylinder, reservac and screen wiper motor.  I painted the brake booster brass, then a light mist of gold and a mist of aluminum.  Made a pretty reasonable cad plating.

 

spacer.pngspacer.png

  • Like 8
Link to post
Share on other sites

Added the pedal boxes, brake and clutch cylinders, brake reaction valve and the blanking plates for the opposite toe box.  Next up;  scratch-build the radiator fan motor and heater valve.

 

spacer.pngspacer.png

  • Like 7
Link to post
Share on other sites

Heavily modified the heater box.  Temporarily fitted it and the heater water valve to the bulkhead.  The slot in the bottom of the box is part of the air diversion system when not needed in the cabin.

 

spacer.pngspacer.png

  • Like 5
Link to post
Share on other sites

Made the radiator fan motor and fan blade.  Yes, it really is that primitive .. no twist or camber.  More like a lawn mower blade than a fan.  Made the torsion bars and installed.  The lower suspension a-arms in the kit actually do have the torsion bar hole, but the bars were not included in the kit.  Installed my improved steering rack and improved sway bar.  The kit has the dampers installed upside down, so I fixed that.  I am not planning on having working front suspension so I glued a lot of the joints.

 

 

spacer.png spacer.pngspacer.png

 

 

  • Like 4
Link to post
Share on other sites

Made the steering column and mounted the battery and heater box.  Next will be the hoses that run from the bulkhead to the heater valve and heater box.  I'm going to experiment with shrink-tube over solder.

 

spacer.pngspacer.pngspacer.png

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...

So I experimented with shrink-tube over solder for the small heater hoses and it did not work very well.  Unless the shrink-tube is very close to the same diameter as the solder, it tends to get wrinkles.  But what it did lead me to discover is that the next larger size of solder is a VERY good method of making hoses with tight right-angle bends.  It does not kink but makes a beautiful full-radius curve.  Painted with a coat of black Vallejo it makes a very convincing hose.  I am now experimenting with the best way to make the hose clamps.  More to come ....  Meanwhile I had purchased a Molotow  chrome pen which I was going to use on the cylinder head dome nuts, but I wasn't sure how I would get access to some of the sides.  Instead, I disassembled the pen and dumped the contents into a old Testors bottle and painted the dome nuts with a small brush.  The photo does not do it justice.  The results are FABULOUS!  My Panther with a Jaguar engine is parked in my heated garage about ten feet from my modeling workbench and when I open the hood to compare the real thing with the model they are indistinguishable.  Very pleased with how it turned out.  And you can airbrush the Molotow as well, which will come in handy later on.

 

spacer.png 

  • Like 5
Link to post
Share on other sites

 Yes, molotow does work great with brushes. Even better when diluted a bit with IPA. That’s why I ordered the refill bottle together with my pen.

Great stuff. 

Looking very nice on the cylinder head.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...