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Don't worry Nick! If i understand correctly, it's an English link for English people...

Some French people could say to another French: "English people, you know..." 

Sorry Nick, I could not resist!

 

Thanks JCH for the link. What a really clever system!
But for our scales...
I know these "snake's nest":

 

200820100244936715.jpg

 

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I suppose you recognise a GT40, in 1/8 scale...

Dan.

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Thanks Nick! However, to my taste the first design of this car was better, more pure, than the last one.
But this color fits perfectly... 

 

Exhaust line more and the end!

The rear small mufflers looks like motorbike ones... Let's go!

 

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Flanges (?) was also needed:

 

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Thanks Mr Alclaad...

 

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Dan.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Already you have seen my steering wheel. But not the Monogram one, and the steering column:

 

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Of course mine is quite different...

 

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How to? 

Two thin mahogany sheets glued on a thin brass piece, a lathe, a dividing head, a jeweler's saw, some files and some hours... No secret!

 

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Thanks for watching,

Dan.

 

 

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I really like those mini-tutorials Dan, reminds me of your epic Talbot-Lago build.

 

The pins within the wooden ring are dots of paint I presume?

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I’m with Roy here. Great that you explain in detail how you work towards such beautiful results.

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For some reason, Jags look fantastic in this colour! 

This wire wheels saloon was stopped at the lights a while back.... 

IMG_20200323_113944

 

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It's a real pleasure to see your creativity and work on the E-type 

Edited by rob Lyttle
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Thank you very much gentlemen!

 

Rob, I enjoyed immediately this color when I found it...

 

To Roy, it's not dots... It's a sort of rivets, 0,5mm brass rod each side sanded...

No pics for this operation!

You can see (not really easily) these "rivets" here the other side:

 

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I found another pics...

 

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On the lathe:

 

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Dan.

 

 

 

 

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Wow... you really make your ambitions come true. It’s very inspiring for me. Making true rivets and fitting them into such a thin ring of wood... simply awesome.

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Nice work, Dan. I see that you have exchanged the motor of your Unimat for one that is nearly as big as the Unimat itself.

 

Oh and what modification do I see in front of the fixed head?

 

I really like these little machines.

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@PROPELLER That steering wheel is a work of art, but I would expect nothing less given the standard of the rest of this build.

 

@rob Lyttle Thanks for that Jaguar Mk.II picture, I've got a Mk.II in my stash and I'm looking for colour inspiration away from the familiar stuff like British Racing Green; I'm not sure if I'd go with the yellow but it's an interesting option.

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Thanks guys!

 

To Poul, the "modification" is an adjustable stop. The stock Unimat motor is THE big problem
on this wonderful little lathe. Fast overheating, poor torque and so one!

 

Take a look here, with a most reliable adjustable stop and all my toys...(Except dividing head ) 

In french, but pics are a better way than explanation:

 

https://www.usinages.com/threads/mon-petit-unimat-emco-3.114415/

 

Dan.

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1 hour ago, PROPELLER said:

Thanks guys!

 

To Poul, the "modification" is an adjustable stop. The stock Unimat motor is THE big problem
on this wonderful little lathe. Fast overheating, poor torque and so one!

 

Take a look here, with a most reliable adjustable stop and all my toys...(Except dividing head ) 

In french, but pics are a better way than explanation:

 

https://www.usinages.com/threads/mon-petit-unimat-emco-3.114415/

 

Dan.

Ah, nice stuff you added. An adjustable stop on the cross-slide too.

Yes, motor overheating is a big issue with the stock motor. I once did a conversion for someone to a dc motor which made it possible to introduce variable speed too.

Big improvement and it was completely reversable, because it used the stock mounting and coul thus also be transferred to drive the milling attachment.

 

Ok, back to the Jag....

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That’s an inspirational thing you’ve built there, very, very impressive. 
 

I’ve got a cheap Chinese model engineering lathe that I treated as an unfinished  kit roughly assembled by chimps, so as long as you disassemble it completely, tidy all the bits up, and put it back together it’s OK. 
 

I don’t however, have a dividing head. What did you get and from where? I’ve looked at Chronos in the UK but they seem expensive and overkill for my needs. 

 

I really do need one but they all seem too big or too expensive or both for modelling like ours?

 

Nick 

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For the Emco Unimat 3, you have this one:

 

Unimat3-005.jpg

 

Different disks are available for different divisions. And you just screw the chuck on it (or any other accessory) to hold your workpiece. You mount it on the bed in upright position or turn it 90 degrees anti-clockwise and mount it on a T-grooved plate.

 

Size is I think something like 5x6.5 cm

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2 hours ago, Pouln said:

For the Emco Unimat 3, you have this one:

 

Unimat3-005.jpg

 

Different disks are available for different divisions. And you just screw the chuck on it (or any other accessory) to hold your workpiece. You mount it on the bed in upright position or turn it 90 degrees anti-clockwise and mount it on a T-grooved plate.

 

Size is I think something like 5x6.5 cm

That looks exactly what I’m after, although it seems (according to google) unobtainable now. 
 

thanks for posting. 
 

Nick

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8 hours ago, nick said:

That looks exactly what I’m after, although it seems (according to google) unobtainable now. 

 

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I found mine on Ebay Nick... Good luck!

Dan.

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Probably not. Emco was an austrian company that manufactured metal working machines as small as this one to major serious big lathes. Don’t think they still manufacture them. 

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Ah, they still do exist. But nothing for hobby machinist, I’m afraid.

It is not a problem, the machines they built themselves (before letting others manufacture them in their name) are so good that they will exist for many years to come. Accessories can be had, new and used, in abundance. Sometimes against silly prices though.

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On 23/08/2020 at 05:47, PROPELLER said:

 

The stock Unimat motor is THE big problem on this wonderful little lathe. Fast overheating, poor torque and so one!

 

I fixed the overheating problem by using a footswitch to control the lathe - it helps considerably. I've still got the torque problem, although it has been improved by using polyurethane drive belts - the other advantage is that they don't overheat and break!

I knock out a set of head bearings every couple of years, mainly due to rounding off octagonal pieces of plate to use for Pocher brake drums etc., but these are easily available (the same size as skateboard bearings) and reasonably cheap.

I need a bigger lathe! I've been looking at the Emco Compact 8 - they come up for sale every now and again.

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