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Anybody driving/restoring real (1:1) classic cars?


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I have a small collection of classic cars - some of them are running (Escort Mk.I, Spitfire Mk.4), others are undergoing the restoration (Escort Mk.2, Burlington SS) or waiting in storage.

Does anybody share similar hobby there?

Cheers

Michael

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Currently don't own anything at the moment, but I am in the market for another classic. Once you've owned one, it's pretty addictive. Don't think I would ever do another restoration though. Think I will buy one "off the shelf" next time. Previously over the years I've had, GMC 6x6, Austin K5, Karrier K6, 1937 Standard Flying 9, Mk II RS Mexico and a Cortina Mk III 2.0 GXL. Not sure what I would go for next, but something 70s or early 80s is what I'm looking for. I've got a soft spot for 70s Japanese cars too. Not sure I can afford the Gran Torino yet!

 

Steve

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Spent yesterday working with my stepson on his Mk1 Fiesta which has been a 4 years (on and off) restoration project.

 

Thought it'd be a nice easy project to do being an 80's Ford but some panels are less available than unicorns and I've had to do quite a bit of "scratchbuilding" of structural parts  - Added to that, I had a major loss of mojo for a year, but we found someone who was able to finish the welding for a reasonable sum.

 

Just a new windscreen to acquire and fit and we're ready for the retest.

 

Then we can get started on my old Skoda Estelle rally car...

 

IanJ 

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I have a 97 Landrover Discovery as my daily drive, does that count?

B)

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Some pictures....

 

28519883433_32f4efee68_c.jpg

 

This is the car as purchased from a gentleman in Torquay in 2015, Shaun was only 16 at the time so I had to drive him down from Leicestershire to look at the car, I had to test drive it (Brakes were as awful as ever, scabby (mostly) surface rust etc) and then make arrangements to take the train down to collect the Fiesta.

 

In the meantime, the owner had put another 12 month's MoT on it for us.

 

Insured it as a "Classic," taxed it and drove it back with 1 eye on the temperature gauge and then me still driving it for that year, as Shaun hadn't passed his test, used it to go to Ford shows,  (Where on more than 1 occasion, people complimented us on our "Rat Look" Fiesta!)

 

Fitted new lowered suspension and Recaro seats during this period.

 

When the MoT ran out I booked it in to my usual garage where, despite me welding up the boot floor and inner rear wheel arches, it failed big time on the structure both sides at the bottom of the A-pillars and inner wings. We'd already started accumulating body parts - Drive to Essex for wing and front panel, other wing posted from Ireland, bonnet from Crewe but none of the bits that needed fixing were available as panels, hence the ”scratchbuilding.”

 

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I’ve done a fair bit of welding in the past (Owning Mini’s has that effect) but I've had to teach myself again, plus the workshop facilities available on the drive were a bit basic but managed with what I had - Welder, hammers, angle grinder, sheet steel, metal shears, a hand operated nibbler/joggling tool and a general "Workmate" bench thingy.

 

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It was about here that I lost my mojo, so it languished on the drive for a year or so, we then found a chap who quoted us £800ish to complete the welding, replacing the lower A-panel (which had become available again which at least meant we didn't have a repeat of the driver's side to look forward to, as well as fitting the wings and front panel (Something I definitely hadn't been looking forward to)

 

Wasn't sure how good the guy was, but when we saw the Lancia Fulvia Zagato he was working on, we knew we were in safe hands....

 

3 months later we collected it.

 

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Looks a lot better than i would have managed.

 

Shaun took it to the garage where he works for an MoT but it failed on a number of items, none of which were related to the structure so we're working our way through them at the moment - Then he gets to finally drive it himself.

 

 

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It's something I wish I said I did. I'm pretty good at it, but I much prefer driving cars hard than I do fixing them or even cleaning them. Unfortunately I'm also Scottish, so I also really struggle with the concept of paying other people to do stuff that's easy and which I could do myself, although I've come to the realisation that I just don't really enjoy lying on my back swearing at cars.

 

I have a 1972 MG Midget which I'm simply not putting the hours into. I tell myself that it's because a Midget is 2 cylinders short of an engine, but it's probably because in reality it seldom seems like a great idea to go work on it.

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Depends on how you define "classic" insurance companies have their own ideas for sure and I've been on the receiving end of their "decisions"

 

In any case I define mine as "modern" classics, 1990 Daihatsu Charade GTti which I'm working on at the moment, an exhaust valve disintegrated and have decided to go over the whole car rather than just fixing the fault, next a 1992 Saab 900 T16s, still going but leaks everything except brake fluid and needs a mid life update 😆 due when the Charade is done and finally a 1998 Mazda 323f V6, beautiful engine from a manufacturer that doesn't believe in rust proofing from the factory lol..

 

I'll go for another when funds allow but do I go older? Don't know, there's so many amazing Japanese stuff from the 80's/early 90's

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I have a '58 Chev Delray 4 door. Had the car since '97 Haven't been on the road yet and was last registered in '71. I bought it from the second owner who wanted to fix it up but it sat in his yard for several years and it earned the floor delete option. Years ago I had a friend who's a welder help me with replacing floor pans and braces from a Biscayne I had which became the parts car with all those parts done. Got some work done but he always wanted to go out to the lounges all the time and nothing went beyond that. (never barter work over drinks). I had a garage made so I could work on it in some comfort and to protect from vandals but so far it's been sitting buried under junk. Don't worry it's light soft stuff. I want to get back on it but became discouraged with people knocking four door cars, people literally turned and walked away and people saying sure I'll help then never show up. I don't have many tools anymore, most walked away. I have to get some tools again and find someone who will help that knows what they are doing. If you want I'll dig up pics of it. It has 97 000 miles on the odometer and still wears the original paint. Has some rust in the usual spots. It had the original 6 cyl. engine and standard trans. But someone filled the engine with regular water and the block froze and a chunk of the cooling jacket broke away. Everyone told me get a 350, so I did out of a 1/2 ton and a 350 trans. I haven't been able to figure out how to hook up the old and new electrical systems yet. I decided I want to find a 261 Pontiac engine and some neat head/carb/header set up. Also go back to a standard. I don't plan on painting it since the paint isn't to bad, it's only original once right? It's anniversary gold and light beige with a green interior. It's also been an original Winnipeg car since new. I want to concentrate on the repairs from the floor down and suspension. Even want to put some nice older style seatbelts, want to be safe but don't plan on hitting anything. Want it to look how it would've by the late '60s, a little rough but a driver. I have Crager SS mags and they'll look good with slim whitewall tyres. Another thing is to get it reliable and someone who can set the carb's choke up, I hate chokes that aren't set up, dealt with that enough.

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My daily at the moment is also not very fresh 2002 Clio Sport.

But now I'm looking for some typically British "wolf in the sheepskin" from the 1960s - a mass-produced 90+BHP rear wheel drive shorter than 14 feet..

If anybody has heard something about the barnfind Cortina Mk.2, Capri Mk.1, Vitesse sedan or MGB GT - it will surely fit.

And Bonhoff - if there's anything you can't find for the Estelle in the UK, maybe I could get it east of the Iron Curtain :)

Cheers

Michael

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.

Edited by bigbadbadge
Ooooo dear, I appear to have added the kiss of death to this thread so deleted as promised
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22 hours ago, KRK4m said:

And Bonhoff - if there's anything you can't find for the Estelle in the UK, maybe I could get it east of the Iron Curtain :)

Hi,

 

Thanks for the offer - Skoda gave up supporting them as soon as VW took over (Something about VW not being happy with their heritage of archaic rear engined cars - Go figure...)

 

As it happens though, there's still a following for them in the Czech Republic, plus I've owned 8 of them and have accumulated quite a few spares - The spares situation is in fact way better than most '80's Fords.

 

IanJ  

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