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Fokker F.32, the Mighty Behemoth - Modified Execuform 1/72nd vacuform


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I have to follow this.

I want the little brother of it, the F.22 so there will be things to learn here if I ever start scratchbuilding my plane.

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Every day is a school day here in Britmodellerland. I’d never heard of this type, but will now be following this build with interest. I like your problem solving techniques 👍🏻
 

Trevor

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5 minutes ago, Max Headroom said:

Every day is a school day here in Britmodellerland. I’d never heard of this type, but will now be following this build with interest. I like your problem solving techniques 👍🏻
 

Trevor

Thanks, Trevor.

And we have to remember: if the techniques don't work, there is always the sledgehammer.

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Excellent progress master, I knew of the ball point pen rib method but was unsure how far you need to go with them, but I see you have gone right to the front edge, can't wait to see how it comes out , I am making notes for a future attempt at some proper scratch building on a larger scale.   I am currently looking at buying a simple Vacform model to have a go at following Martian's tutorial thread so that will help too.  

Thanks Moa

All the best

Chris

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41 minutes ago, Moa said:

Thanks, Trevor.

And we have to remember: if the techniques don't work, there is always the sledgehammer.

I have a couple of models on the go which might meet with an ‘accident’!

 

Trevor 

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25 minutes ago, bigbadbadge said:

was unsure how far you need to go with them, but I see you have gone right to the front edge,

Only on tubular structures like these tail feathers, with other structures (sheeted leading edge, etc.) you have to look at photos (NOT plans) to see were the relief is evident. Some wings, for example, have their first third covered in metal or wood, so the ribs are visible only after that.

It's a case-by-case situation.

 

25 minutes ago, bigbadbadge said:

on a larger scale.

You are walking on thin ice, mister. 😄

 

22 minutes ago, Max Headroom said:

I have a couple of models on the go which might meet with an ‘accident’!

 

Trevor 

Trevor: shall we call them "catastrophic structural failures"? 😄

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And almost ready:

IMG_1286b+%25281280x960%2529.jpg

 

The wheel caps are domed with a rolling ball tool:

IMG_1287+%25281280x960%2529.jpg

 

IMG_1288+%25281280x960%2529.jpg

 

The resin wheels, that where discarded from a long forgotten project, were riddled with air bubbles/pinholes, so putty is liberally applied. The wheel pants are assembled:

IMG_1290+%25281280x960%2529.jpg

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1 hour ago, bigbadbadge said:

 I am currently looking at buying a simple Vacform model to have a go at following Martian's tutorial thread so that will help too. 

@Martian has done a stupendous job with that post, showing and telling. It's a great tutorial and will help many a modeler.

 

He has unfair, unsportsmanlike advantages, though:

"The majority of neurons in an octopus Martians are found in the arms, which can independently taste and touch and also control basic motions without input from the brain."

(Quoted from here): https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/the-mind-of-an-octopus/

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Thanks Moa for the tips, I am going to start the search again by the look of it as the kit I was watching has doubled in price which is a shame, but hey ho.  I will find something.  

Very interesting article re the Octopus/Martians too, I see what you mean!!!

All the best

Chris

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You were doing so well Moa, right up to the second paragraph of your post. You see, I am now going to have to get involved with your thread, with all the mayhem and chaos that will inevitably accompany it.

 

Martian 👽

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1 hour ago, Martian said:

You were doing so well Moa, right up to the second paragraph of your post. You see, I am now going to have to get involved with your thread, with all the mayhem and chaos that will inevitably accompany it.

 

Martian 👽

Oh, my, what have I done!!!!!

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The F.32 double tandem arrangement wasn't unusual. The Farman Jabiru had the same configuration (and the same cooling problems), as well as the Farman of the 220 series (ditto).

 

(Pages from Gallica digital archives)

Look at this beauty, one of my most cherished projects for the future:

N6555017_JPEG_297_297EM.jpg

 

And I have the kit of this one, which I almost started together with the F.32, but it would have been too much. Later.

N6553461_JPEG_40_40DM.jpg

N6554864_JPEG_9_9EM.jpg

 

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And now for the product of preliminary research, to help with the selection of a specific candidate from these seven:

NC124M

Prototype. Seemingly the only one to have full cockpit roof in clear panes.

As explained, different horizontal tail and two vertical tails, later on the third was added as in the series aircraft.  Different, rather clumsy-looking wheel pants. A simpler interior, with seats not unlike those on the Dragon Rapide and later Ford Trimotors. Series planes had a much more elaborate decorations and the seats had special cushioning. The only F.32 to have P&W Wasps. Series had P&W Hornets.

 

NC113N

Had partially "corrugated" (more like battened) engine gondola section earlier in life, and smooth sections later, associated with added Townend rings and the lettering "WAE" on the wing. Some photos distinctively show that in later times the upper section of the  wing as seen from the LE had a different color than the rest (that was aluminum) and this may have been associated in turn with diagonal strips on the top of the wing in International orange color. There is a plan that shows those stripes, but misses the colored portion of the leading edge. Later arrangements also had two large prongs (perhaps the two oil coolers?) moved up the gondola, ahead of the main LG strut (to further help with cooling?), the nemesis of engine tandem arrangements and their ultimate demise.

Exhaust arrangements were also modified during the relatively short aircraft life.

The Western Electric radio mast can be seen truncated in the later arrangements, and there is also an unknown device on the leading edge that looks like a landing light faring.

 

NC130M

Also shows the radio antenna mast, and later in life only one Townend ring on the front engine. Earlier the two external fins were connected by a broad strut. Small eight half-circle clear panes on cockpit roof.

 

NC334N

As NC113, only later in its life it got its Townend rings in both engines. The aft ring was different than the front one in all planes. The same changes in surface in the engine gondolas. WAE is added at some point under the wing. The same pair of devices is associated with the rings. Small four half-circle windows on cockpit roof.

 

NC335N

Few photos can be found. Exhibited at an air show at the Madison Square Garden. Four small clear window panes on cockpit roof in the shape of half circles. In those photos it absolutely dwarfs the Ford Trimotor.

 

NC336N:

Few photos. No radio mast, ring on front engine.

 

NC342N:

Fokker's own personal plane, luxury interior, very complex color scheme (if I could only know with certainty the colors).

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1 hour ago, Martian said:

You were doing so well Moa,

 

2 hours ago, Moa said:

control basic motions without input from the brain."

Curiously enough, Mrs. Moa (that jumped at your defense) says that we then  may have something in common: she stated that most, if not all, of my functions are performed without any input from my brain.

In fact, says she, she doubts I have one at all.

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This is the way I would like to solve the insertion of the wing. Removing the indicated sections, I should be able to insert the nose and pivot the wing down:

IMG_1294+%25281280x960%2529.jpg

 

The interior no doubt will be laborious and time-consuming; dealing with the complex missing surface detail on the fuselage sides and gondolas will require extra care, but the real challenge I am afraid will be the engine gondola/landing gear clusters.

17 struts and connecting sections per side are needed, and fabrication, assembly and alignment will be, how to put it in technical terms...a freaking nightmare?

 

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Wow 17 struts and connecting sections per side.  This is commitment on you part and after doing this you may be committed!!!

Seriously very much looking forward to seeing this progress and the interior and toilet emerge.

All the best

Chris

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7 hours ago, Moa said:

17 struts and connecting sections per side are needed, and fabrication, assembly and alignment will be, how to put it in technical terms...a freaking nightmare?

Most probably it will. And all that will make the finished model so much more enjoyable.

One problem at a time, and it will be fine in the end, after much work.

Reminds me a bit of the second stage engine heat shield on my Saturn V.

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I've never heard of this giant before, although I was aware of the French ones. I'm sure you will rise to the strut challenge with the aid of brass rod and tube with a jig to align them 😀

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7 hours ago, bigbadbadge said:

looking forward to seeing this progress and the interior and toilet emerge.

Not one, but two restrooms!

Double the fun!

4590467126_c5fdd89050_o.jpg

7 hours ago, Bengalensis said:

Reminds me a bit of the second stage engine heat shield on my Saturn V.

Wow, Jörgen, a multifaceted modeler. Could you add a link?

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7 hours ago, Teuchter said:

I've never heard of this giant before, although I was aware of the French ones. I'm sure you will rise to the strut challenge with the aid of brass rod and tube with a jig to align them 😀

Thanks.

Only a few are round in section allowing the rod/tube solution, the rest is airfoiled, but some sliding could be arranged.

We will cross that bridge when we get to it. Or take the ferry.

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