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ERK

Attack on La Haye Sainte (Waterloo)

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6 minutes ago, Jim Wasley said:

These figures look great,and the red on the right figure looks OK to me.

Jim.

Yeah  its strange, in the  pot it looks like a dark pinky salmon but after a few coats are on it dries red,   shame about the shiny finish - only happens with the red and blue, the white  and bauge  are nice and flat, I read up on the net its down to the pigments not mixing aswel  despite sriring the living daylights out of them.

 

Erk.

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Only trouble I am having now  after changing over from Tamiya Acrylics to Vallejo is  -  the Flat Red  does not look  very red in the pot - looks more like a salmon pinky colour,  also despite giving the paints a thorough stir (till my hand hurt)  they are not  going very flat  and are keeping a sheen to them.

I am applying the paint ontop of Vallejo Black Surface Primer thats had a couple of days to dry, so that should not be an issue.

 

Erk.

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Hi all,   more progress  - so  after talking with the shop where I got my paints from they decided to  send me Two new bottles of Vallejo Flat Red and  Dark Prussian Blue, but they also sent me a freeby  of Vallejo Flat Medium,   they told me by adding a bit  of this to the paints it will help to dull them and achieve more of a flat finish.

 

Anyway on with the figures  - more work on the 5th KGL.

 

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A couple of comments on colours.

 

In the Napoleonic period colours were not like modern dyes and would fade and wash out quite fast. One description of the Scots Greys at Waterloo notes that their cartridge belts were pink, from the dye in the jackets being washed out and soaked into the pipeclay used to whiten the belts.

 

Also British red coats were a dark red, almost brick red, for privates and corporals and scarlet for sergeants and officers. Scarlet coats for all ranks was not adopted until after sometime after the Crimean war.

 

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On 27/08/2020 at 13:57, Niall said:

A couple of comments on colours.

 

In the Napoleonic period colours were not like modern dyes and would fade and wash out quite fast. One description of the Scots Greys at Waterloo notes that their cartridge belts were pink, from the dye in the jackets being washed out and soaked into the pipeclay used to whiten the belts.

 

Also British red coats were a dark red, almost brick red, for privates and corporals and scarlet for sergeants and officers. Scarlet coats for all ranks was not adopted until after sometime after the Crimean war.

 

I  could see what you mean after  checking out pics on the net, so I have re done some already  making the uniform more brick - red ochre colour  by adding some oak brown to to my flat red.

 

Mind you I am now having problems getting a really flat paint finish from both the Vallejo Acrylic paints (red and blue especially) and even the Vallejo Acrylic Matt varnish  - tried every trick in the book  - shook it / stired it till may hand fell off,  wattered it with distilled water to about  40/60  (40 = water)   even added some Vallejo Matt Medium  -   and done several thin coats  heated  with a hairdryer between coats  - but still not going flat  - more like a  satin finish.

Its funny cuz blacks, whites  etc  are loverly  and flat  right out the bottle.

 

Erk.

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Hi all,   I am making slow pace with these  15 down  100-odd  to go,   latest finished minus a dull top coat  - two more french 51 ligne.

 

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On 8/27/2020 at 1:57 PM, Niall said:

A couple of comments on colours.

 

In the Napoleonic period colours were not like modern dyes and would fade and wash out quite fast. One description of the Scots Greys at Waterloo notes that their cartridge belts were pink, from the dye in the jackets being washed out and soaked into the pipeclay used to whiten the belts.

 

Also British red coats were a dark red, almost brick red, for privates and corporals and scarlet for sergeants and officers. Scarlet coats for all ranks was not adopted until after sometime after the Crimean war.

 


They were also repaired/patched a lot.

 

I have some nice 28mm white metal figures for a skirmish game.  In the game each figure is a recognisable character  they have put a lot of effort in to make them different.  Uniforms with patches, one infantryman that has a piglet stuffed in his forage bag, unusual poses.
 

Must get round to painting them.
 

Cheers,

 

Nigel

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