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Hawker Hunter FGA.9 - question on external fuel tank and intake color


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Hi comrades!

 

Two questions on the Hunter FGA.9

 

This small dent exists on both sides of the tank? Or only on the outboard of the tanks? 

 

And what was the main intakes color in middle sixties on the silver bottomed Hunters?

 

Thanks in advance!

 

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I suspect the answer to the first question would be to find out if somebody kicked it or not.

with regard to intake colours, the Hunter F6A preserved at Duxford  has a very light buff colour quite close to the radome tan seen on USN aircraft of the 1960s and 1970s.

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41 minutes ago, cema_ga said:

Hi comrades!

 

Two questions on the Hunter FGA.9

 

This small dent exists on both sides of the tank? Or only on the outboard of the tanks? 

 

And what was the main intakes color in middle sixties on the silver bottomed Hunters?

 

Thanks in advance!

 

00.jpg

That small dent probably only existed on that tank! Drop tanks are quite flimsy things with thin skins, they get bashed and dented a lot.

 

Selwyn

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I did noticed that on the 230 gallon tanks as well on the Singapore Hunters. The "dent" or depression was present on both sides of the tanks.

Consulted a Hunter airframe technician friend, and he says there is nothing in the AP that mention about the depression.

In his opinion, it is likely to allow additional clearance between the main wheel door and the tank when the gears are lowered. 

Perhaps some one can confirm that.

Attached are some pics of the tanks mounted on Singapore Hunters. 

 

539

 

527

 

502

 

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12 hours ago, Selwyn said:

That small dent probably only existed on that tank! Drop tanks are quite flimsy things with thin skins, they get bashed and dented a lot.

 

Selwyn

Contrary to being "flimsy with thin skins", the subject tanks were made from Mild Steel and quite hefty.  YK GOH s quite correct, the indentation was to ensure that the landing gear doors cleared the tank during landing when the  main gear became, temporarily, fully compressed.  :-

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The Javelin also had the same requirement in its day :-

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The Fairy Gannet had a similar but larger indentation in the outer skin of the bomb doors.  This to ensure that the main gear could be raised/lowered should, 

for some reason, the bomb doors remain open :-

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Air intakes on Hunters up until around the late 70's were natural metal, Aluminium, which weathered to a metallic Grey colour.

 

HTH

 

Dennis

  

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2 hours ago, sloegin57 said:

The Javelin also had the same requirement in its day :-

Isn't that a Hunter tank on the Javelin though Dennis? The indentation is in the same place, and is well clear of the Javelin undercarriage.

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6 hours ago, YK GOH said:

id noticed that on the 230 gallon tanks as well on the Singapore Hunters. The "dent" or depression was present on both sides of the tanks.

Consulted a Hunter airframe technician friend, and he says there is nothing in the AP that mention about the depression.

In his opinion, it is likely to allow additional clearance between the main wheel door and the tank when the gears are lowered. 

Perhaps some one can confirm that.

Attached are some pics of the tanks mounted on Singapore Hunters. 

 

3 hours ago, sloegin57 said:

Air intakes on Hunters up until around the late 70's were natural metal, Aluminium, which weathered to a metallic Grey colour.

Fantastic! Thank You very much!!!

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  • 1 month later...

Following an incident when a 230-gallon tank came off an FGA.9 when pulling out of a dive and it smashed into the aileron causing the aircraft to crash, one of the pilots on 8 Squadron became involved in an investigation into fuel-flow within the 230-gallon tanks. The subsequent inquiry found that as the aircraft pulled up the fuel in the half empty tanks shot from end to the other causing the tank to break away. The resolution was to fit a baffle inside the tank to break the flow fuel under heavy g loads and although he couldn't say for sure, he thought the indentation was in line with the baffle. 

Incidentally, the tanks were far from flimsy. We used to jump on them when dismounting from the wing - solid a a rock.

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On 6/20/2020 at 11:56 AM, Dave Swindell said:

Isn't that a Hunter tank on the Javelin though Dennis? The indentation is in the same place, and is well clear of the Javelin undercarriage.

Probably - I believe they were the same tank &  interchangeable - several bases where Hunters & javelins shared facilities.

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