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Weathering down to the aluminium?


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4 hours ago, 72modeler said:

f that's a diorama, it's a pretty darned good one!


1/1 scale. Hans is admonishing Friedrich for overdoing the panel lines, while Albrecht says nothing, hoping that Hans won’t notice the fact that he used the wrong shade of olive drab...

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13 minutes ago, Blimpyboy said:

Some minor weathering from all angles here...

You would think there would be some ZCY showing somewhere.

Mike

 

...and then there's this classic...via Youube

 

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14 hours ago, Blimpyboy said:

Some minor weathering from all angles here...

 

corsair.jpg

Anybody got a tin of paint? :D

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We've seen it before but always thought the first 30 seconds of this film shows why you get wing root wear down to the aluminium on a Spitfire.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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4 hours ago, seadog said:

Anybody got a tin of paint? :D

The Arromanches' paint shop must have been all out of Sacre Bleu! :giggle:

Mike

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4 hours ago, Ray_W said:

We've seen it before

Ray,

 

Am I crazy? Looking at the footage of what looks like a No. 65 East India Squadron Spitfire  being rearmed, it sure looks like a Mk IIb to me and not a Vb. What do you think? That's a great video that shows a lot of modeling details . Thanks for posting it.

Mike

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Nothing like muddy wellies for carving up paint! 

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1 hour ago, 72modeler said:

Looking at the footage of what looks like a No. 65 East India Squadron Spitfire  being rearmed, it sure looks like a Mk IIb to me and not a Vb. What do you think? 

Hi Mike,

Not too sure, although I could not spot a Coffman starter blister. Looks like I'll be sent to the back of the class room until I do more study on IIb and Vb nuances. I'm sure one of the Spitfire experts will chime in.

Ray

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On 6/18/2020 at 12:01 PM, Ray_W said:

Hi Mike,

Not too sure, although I could not spot a Coffman starter blister. Looks like I'll be sent to the back of the class room until I do more study on IIb and Vb nuances. I'm sure one of the Spitfire experts will chime in.

Ray

Ray,

 

I found a couple of photos that show Mk IIb's from the RH side, and they do have the Coffman starter blister. The Morgan and Shacklady Spitfire book states that there were 170 Mk IIb's built at the factory and an unknown number that were converted MkIIa's. There is a serial list for the factory-built IIb's but no details on squadron allocations or codes to go with them. All of the photos I found of IIb's show them with the short pointed spinner and DH props. Best I can do with the references I have, Perhaps @Graham Boak might know? I would love to do a No. 65 Squadron IIb!

Mike

Edited by 72modeler
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If you find out, let me know.  The only comment I can make is that the early Rotol spinner is usually seen on a Mk.II rather than a Mk.V, but I'd have to look at a lot of photos before guessing just how rare (or not).  . On rebuilt Mk.IIs...who knows?   65 Sq had both late Mk.IIBs and early Mk.VBs.

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8 hours ago, 72modeler said:

I found a couple of photos that show Mk IIb's from the RH side, and they do have the Coffman starter blister.

Sorry to steer this away from weathering.

 

Mike check the video. There are not many starboard cowl images but I cannot see a Coffman blister. Is it there or not? Hard to tell. This image has no hyperlink it is just from the linked image from my earlier post:

 

65 Sq No Coffman Starter

 

 

7 hours ago, Graham Boak said:

65 Sq had both late Mk.IIBs and early Mk.VBs

Anyway, Graham mentioned 65 Squadron using late Mk.IIb's so you might get your wish.

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@Graham Boak and @Ray_W,

 

Did a little 'net recce this morning and found a couple of photos as well as a decal sheet that shows two of the cannon-armed Spits in the film. One was YT-L AR384, and the other was YT-J, serial unknown. Both apparently flown by Czech pilots and  both are listed as being Mk Vb's. I didn't see Coffman starter blisters, in either the photos or on the decal sheet illustrations and text. No way of knowing if the info on the decal sheet is accurate, but appears to be so. Guess my favorite 65 Sq. early Spit will still be the oft-photographed Mk IIa YT-L P7665.

 

(It's getting crazy here- people are wandering around in big groups and without masks, and wonder of wonders, the numbers of infected persons is going up exponentially....what were they thinking? Hope all is well with both of you.) Me, I'm following protocols, but think all of the Revell 'S' cement and Diosol  fumes I have been exposed to for 50 years have probably given me immunity!

MIke

 

https://www.1001modelkits.com/spitfire-model-kit/334720-aml-amlc9032-decals-supermarine-spitfire-mk-vb-czechoslovak-pilots-of-no-65-squadron-raf.html

 

Link to the Mk IIa YT-L's history

http://aircrewremembered.com/hill-geoffrey.html

Edited by 72modeler
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7 minutes ago, 72modeler said:

but think all of the Revell 'S' cement and Diosol  fumes I have been exposed to for 50 years has probably given me immunity!

And here I was thinking it was Mr Levelling Thinners! 

 

Good to know you got an answer on the Vb's even if not a IIb. Soon I'll be weathering my current Spitfire build down to the Aluminium - where appropriate.

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I've been working on and around aircraft for 40 years, and can tell you there is a difference between 'chipping' and 'wear'. The ability to withstand 'chipping' depends on how carefully the surface was prepared before the primer was applied, and how rigid the structure underneath is.  Even the best 'etch' primer will chip and flake off if the aluminum skin underneath flexes, bends or expands and contracts to much, taking the paint with it.  The paint/primer combo is relatively brittle and will not take kindly to  repeated movement. Also repeated soaking in volatile fluids (fuel, oil, hydraulic fluids) will soften and loosen the finish coat. The most common example is the photo above of the Spitfire - the finish has flaked off the wing root fillet due to flexing, taking the primer with it.

'Wear' is different. For example, walking across a wing surface repeatedly will gradually grind through the paint to the primer, then through that to the metal underneath. The most wear occurs on top of the ribs, stringers etc., where the skin is most rigid.  That's where you get a large area of paint scuffed down to the primer, with smaller areas inside that worn to the metal, and chips and flakes missing from the flexing portions.

Even newer, modern airliners painted with great care, and preparation using the latest epoxy paints have to be touched up at maintenance checks and repainted completely on a regular basis.

 

This is my attempt at showing that kind of wear, (it could have been better, but it was a first experiment)

 

Image23

 

top

 

 

Edited by Tail-Dragon
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@Tail-Dragon

 

I would say you nailed both degrees of wear on your build! The oft-seen photo you posted also shows the early windscreen and supercharger shrouds fitted to the early P-38's perfectly! 👍

Mike

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