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1 JUNE

 

1995 Vladimir Dezhurov & Gennadi Strekalov [IVA] (Mir Expedition 18)

 

Duration 23 min

 

The cosmonauts performed another Intra-Vehicular Activity inside Mir's docking compartment, moving the Konus drogue from the forward port to the -Y, so that the newly-arrived Spektr Module could be relocated there. As planned, Spektr had linked up at the main port on the station's axis, but was then swung round by a mechanical arm to its permanent location on the side. Once it was hard docked, the module's probe and Mir's drogue could be removed: this manoeuvre took place on 3 June.

 

Fifth EVA for Dezhurov; sixth and final one for Strekalov: his career total is 22 hr 41 min.

 

 


2006 Pavel Vinogradov & Jeffrey Williams (ISS Expedition 13)

 

Duration 6 hr 31 min

 

Williams wore a Russian space-suit for this EVA, in which the two installed a valve nozzle on the hydrogen vent used by both the Elektron oxygen generator and the Vozdukh CO₂ eliminator. Elektron split water into oxygen and hydrogen and vented the latter into space: the new valve would prevent a dangerous build-up of hydrogen. They then relocated an antenna cable to improve performance, and retrieved various space-exposure experiments. Finally, they replaced a faulty camera: this work required the EVA to be extended beyond the planned duration but ensured the task would not have to be put off to another time.

 

Sixth EVA for Vinogradov; the second for Williams.

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2 JUNE

 

No EVAs on this date.

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3 JUNE

 

1965 Ed White (Gemini IV)

 

Duration 36 min

 

This was America's first EVA and was originally planned to be a Stand-up only. However, following Alexei Leonov's space-walk on Voskhod 2, it was decided that White would perform a full EVA to avoid falling behind the Soviets. The flight plan called for the EVA to begin about three hours into the mission, but an attempt to rendezvous with the second stage of the Titan II launch vehicle had proved much harder than anticipated (and was unsuccessful anyway) so it was not until the third orbit that it began. White initially struggled with the hatch before managing to open it. He stood up in his seat and installed a 16mm camera to record the EVA (stills from which have become iconic) then gently pushed himself out of the spacecraft with a Hand-Held Manoeuvring Unit which used compressed oxygen emerging from nozzles at either end of a pipe. This, however, only had a supply of twenty seconds. White examined the exterior of the capsule, then evaluated the 7m umbilical line that supplied his oxygen as well as carrying communications and bioinstrumentation feeds. To avoid putting any stress on this, a slightly shorter tether secured him to the spacecraft to prevent it reaching its full length. White then made contact with Jim McDivitt's side of the capsule, earning the rebuke, "You smeared up my windshield, you dirty dog!" Apart from the mere fact that it had taken place, the Soviets had released no information about Leonov's EVA so NASA had no idea how White would react to it. In the event he appeared to be having the time of his life and was reluctant to get back into the spacecraft, doing so only after a direct order from Mission Control. At the end, White struggled to close the hatch, so it was decided not to open it a second time to discard equipment.

 

White's only EVA.

 

 


2008 Mike Fossum & Ron Garan (STS-124/ISS)

 

Duration 6 hr 48 min

 

The astronauts tested a new type of space-suit glove with reinforced patches on the thumb and index finger, areas which had shown minor tears on previous EVAs. These were made of the same material as on the palm of the glove, though with a tighter and stronger weave called 'TurtleSkin'. At the start of the EVA, Garan unbolted the Orbiter Boom Sensor System from the S1 Truss, where it had been temporarily stowed during an EVA in March, while Fossum disconnected its power umbilical; the boom was then transferred to the cargo bay for return to Earth. They also carried out preparatory work on the Japanese Kibo Module, still secure in the cargo bay, ready for its attachment to the station. Garan then replaced a Trundle Bearing Assembly, one of twelve components that allow the outer part of the truss to rotate so that the solar arrays are always pointed in the right direction. This had been installed on the previous EVA in March but had been causing problems. Fossum examined the area and retrieved debris samples from the rotary joint.

 

Fourth EVA for Fossum; the first for Garan.

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4 JUNE

 

No EVAs on this date.

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5 JUNE

 

1966 Gene Cernan (Gemini IX-A)

 

Duration 2 hr 9 min

 

This was only America's second ever EVA but an ambitious programme had been planned. After Gemini docked with its ATDA target, Cernan would retrieve an experiment package then move to the rear of the spacecraft where an Astronaut Manoeuvring Unit was mounted. He would unfold its arms, strap himself in and take it on a test run. However the first item on the list had to be dropped when the crew found that the target vehicle's shroud had failed to jettison, making docking impossible. Rendezvous had also been more demanding than expected so the EVA was postponed for twenty-four hours. When Cernan finally emerged he made his way back along the spacecraft  but found this difficult: the thick umbilical tether proved difficult to manage and the handrails on the side of the Adapter Section did not help him control his movements. Ed White's brief excursion a year earlier had not given NASA the opportunity to learn the difficulties of EVA work and the need for an astronaut to be properly braced in position was not yet understood. Cernan later reported that he was devoting fifty percent of his workload just to maintain his position. These exertions exceeded the suit's capacity to remove moisture and his helmet visor fogged over, blinding him. He was able to don the AMU by touch alone but Tom Stafford in the Commander's seat would not allow him to continue on safety grounds and the EVA was terminated.

 

Cernan's first EVA.

 

 


2008 Mike Fossum & Ron Garan (STS-124/ISS)

 

Duration 7 hr 11 min

 

The astronauts continued the assembly of the Japanese Kibo Module, installing television cameras at either end of the laboratory. They then removed thermal covers from its robotic arm joints and prepared for the attachment of the Common Berthing Mechanism by removing more thermal shields, bolts and launch locks. With this task complete, they shifted their attention to the station's Nitrogen Tank Assembly, disconnecting electrical and nitrogen lines from the old tank and fitting foot restraints for use on the subsequent EVA.

 

Fifth EVA for Fossum; second for Garan.

 

 


2009 Gennady Padalka & Mike Barratt (ISS Expedition 20)

 

Duration 4 hr 54 min

 

The main objective of this EVA was to prepare Zvezda for the arrival of the new Russian Mini-Research Module (MRM-2), which would provide an additional docking port. The work included the installation of new rendezvous antennas and a docking target, and electrical connectors for the Kurs automated system. When this had been accomplished Barratt rode the Strela crane to a point from which he could photograph the new antennas. The start of the EVA had been delayed because ground controllers had received telemetry that seemed to indicate high levels of carbon dioxide in the space-suits, but eventually it was allowed to go ahead and once it was complete neither man showed any ill effects.

 

Seventh EVA for Padalka; the first for Barratt.

 

 

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6 JUNE

 

1996 Yuri Onufrienko & Yuri Usachyov (Mir Expedition 21)

 

Duration 3 hr 34 min

 

The cosmonauts replaced cassettes on a Swiss-Russian experiment on the exterior of Spektr, then installed a Particle Impact Experiment and the Mir Sample Return Experiment. They also mounted the SKK-11 cassette, which exposed construction materials to space conditions.

 

Fifth EVA for both cosmonauts.

 

 


2007 Fyodor Yurchikhin & Oleg Kotov (ISS Expedition 15)

 

Duration 5 hr 37 min

 

First task was to install the Biorisk experiment on the exterior of the Pirs Module. This analysed how microorganisms affect structural materials in space. They then ran a reel of Ethernet cable along Zarya, the first of two lines to increase the station's computing power. Finally they completed the installation of the protective panels begun on 30 May, fetching the remaining twelve from the Christmas Tree rack and fitting them on Zvezda.

 

Second EVA for both cosmonauts.

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7 JUNE

 

1973 Pete Conrad & Joe Kerwin (Skylab 2)

 

Duration 3 hr 30 min

 

This was the first EVA from the Skylab Workshop (as opposed to the Apollo ferry) and as such the first American use of an airlock. Pre-docking attempts to release the jammed solar array had been unsuccessful and the situation was now becoming critical so it was essential that the panel be freed. The astronauts began by using six 1.5m poles to construct a cable cutter that would enable them to break the aluminium strap that was holding the solar array half-shut, while maintaining a safe distance. After some initial difficulties, Kerwin managed to catch the strap with the cutting edge. Conrad now used a device which in the best NASA tradition was called the Beam Erection Tether, which consisted of a 9,8m rope attached to the middle of a 2m one, with hooks at all three of the free ends. The short rope was attached to holes in the solar array while the longer one was secured to the Workshop exterior before being passed over Conrad's shoulder. As Kerwin cut the strap, Conrad braced his feet against the Workshop exterior and strained upwards, though it was not until Kerwin joined him that the array finally moved. Engineers had suspected that a hydraulic damper had frozen and the strain of the two astronauts pushing on the rope finally freed it. The electrical readings on the ground showed that the operation had been a success and the solar panel was at last supplying power. Before returning to the Workshop the astronauts changed the film in one of the ATM cameras and pinned open a jammed telescope aperture door.

 

Third EVA for Conrad (the first in microgravity; the previous two being on the lunar surface); the only one for Kerwin.

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8 JUNE

 

2001 Yuri Usachyov & James Voss [IVA] (ISS Expedition 2)

 

Duration 19 min

 

This brief IVA took place within Zvezda's transfer compartment and involved removing the hatch from the Earth-facing port and replacing it with a docking cone. This was the first spacewalk carried out from the ISS without a docked Shuttle.

 

Seventh and last EVA for Usachyov, giving him a career total of 30 hr 50 min. Fourth and last for Voss: his total is 22 hr 45 min.

 

 


2008 Mike Fossum & Ron Garan (STS-124/ISS)

 

Duration 6 hr 33 min

 

The astronauts completed the replacement of the nitrogen tank on the S1 Truss. Standing on the manipulator arm, Garan removed four bolts securing the old tank, attached a portable handle and carried it to the stowage platform. Meanwhile, Fossum was preparing the new tank by putting the bolts in place. Garan then attached the carrying handle and transported it to its location on the truss and secured it in place. Fossum moved to the Japanese Kibo laboratory and released locks from the module's windows, then removed thermal covers from its cameras. He also mounted micrometeoroid debris shields. Finally the two astronauts reinstalled two cameras, which had been repaired, onto the truss.

 

Sixth EVA for Fossum; third for Garan.

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9 JUNE

 

2002 Franklin Chang-Diaz & Philippe Perrin (STS-111/ISS)

 

Duration 7 hr 14 min

 

The astronauts installed a Power and Data Grapple Fixture to the P6 Truss, which would allow it to be transferred to its final position. They also fitted six micrometeoroid shields to a temporary location on the Pressurised Mating Adapter: a later crew would move them to the exterior of the Zvezda Module. The astronauts also photographed a failed gyroscope and removed thermal blankets from the Mobile Base System, the platform on which the station's manipulator arm was located.

 

First EVA for both men.

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10 JUNE

 

2009 Gennadi Padalka & Michael Barratt [IVA] (ISS Expedition 20)

 

Duration 12 min

 

This is the shortest spacewalk ever performed. The crew replaced a hatch on Zvezda with a docking cone ready for the arrival of the next Mini-Research Module (MRM-2) later in the year.

 

Eighth EVA for Padalka; second and final one for Barratt - his career total is 5 hr 6 min.

 

Note that in the entry for 5 June it was wrongly stated that Barratt had only carried out one EVA - this is because under the American definition the activity mentioned above would not qualify as a spacewalk, therefore it was overlooked. The entry for 5 June has been corrected accordingly.

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11 JUNE

 

2002 Franklin Chang-Diaz & Philippe Perrin (STS-111/ISS)

 

Duration 5 hr

 

The astronauts completed the installation of the Mobile Base System, the platform on which the station's manipulator arm was mounted. They hooked up its primary and backup video and data cables as well as the power leads linking it to the Mobile Transporter. This enabled the platform to move along tracks across the entire station. They then attached an auxiliary grapple fixture to the platform and relocated a camera on the MBS to provide better views of EVAs as they were being conducted.

 

Second EVA for both astronauts.

 

 


2007 James Reilly & Daniel Olivas (STS-117/ISS)

 

Duration 6 hr 15 min

 

The task on this EVA was to install the S3/S4 Trusses on the Station. Before it began, the trusses were lifted out of the cargo bay by the Shuttle's manipulator arm then handed over to that of the ISS, but the asymmetric mass caused the control gyroscopes to go offline and the station temporarily lost attitude. This was not unexpected but the EVA was delayed an hour until they could be reactivated. When all was in order the astronauts mounted the trusses and connected power lines. They also removed six launch locks from the boxes holding the furled solar arrays.

 

Fourth EVA for Reilly; the first for Olivas.

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12 JUNE

 

1987 Yuri Romanenko & Aleksandr Leveykin (Mir Expedition 2)

 

Duration 1 hr 53 min

 

To save weight, the Mir base block was launched with only two solar arrays, providing a total of 9.4 kW of electricity. A third array had arrived inside the Kvant Module and this was the first of two EVAs to install it. The cosmonauts attached an extendable hinged lattice girder to the top of Mir then mounted folded solar panels to either side. As a test of their ability to operate without foot restraints, they relied entirely on tethers: Leveykin later said that this gave them more freedom to manoeuvre but they had to cling on to the structure with one hand.

 

Third EVA for Romanenko; the second for Leveykin

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13 JUNE

 

1996 Yuri Onufrienko & Yuri Usachyov (Mir Expedition 21)

 

Duration 5 hr 42 min

 

The cosmonauts assembled a four-section 5.9m truss known as Strombus, which was installed on the underside of Kvant. They then moved to Priroda and manually deployed the Travers Syntheric Aperture Radar antenna, a saddle-shaped device. Finally, they filmed the final segment of the commercial for the Pepsi-Cola company.

 

Sixth EVA for both cosmonauts.

 

 


2002 Franklin Chang-Diaz & Philippe Perrin (STS-111/ISS)

 

Duration 7 hr 16 min

 

The astronauts replaced a faulty wrist roll joint on the station's manipulator arm: the new joint had been brought up in the Orbiter's cargo bay. They then aligned the new component with the yaw joint, reinforced the connection with six bolts, and connected power, data and video lines. All of this activity restored the arm to full operational capability.

 

The third and final EVA for both astronauts, giving them each a career total of 19 hr 31 min.

 

 


2007 Patrick Forrester & Steven Swanson (STS-117/ISS)

 

Duration 7 hr 16 min

 

On the previous EVA the folded solar array box had been attached to the newly-installed S3/S4 Truss. Now, with the panels unfurled, the astronauts removed the launch locks which had held the Solar Alpha Rotary Joint in place. They then attempted to install a new drive lock assembly but flight controllers discovered that commands they were trying to send to this unit were actually being received by an existing drive lock. Checks showed that the original assembly was still in a safe configuration so the attempt was abandoned. The EVA ended with the retraction of one of the ISS's older solar arrays to make room for the new one.

 

Third EVA for Forrester; the first for Swanson.

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14 JUNE

 

2018 Drew Feustel & Ricky Arnold (ISS Expedition 56)

 

Duration 6 hr 49 min

 

The astronauts installed new high-definition cameras that will provide enhanced views during the final phase of approach and docking of the SpaceX Crew Dragon and Boeing Starliner craft. They also swapped out a camera assembly on the starboard truss of the station, closed an aperture door on an external environmental imaging experiment outside the Japanese Kibo Module, and completed two additional tasks to relocate a grapple bar to aid future spacewalkers and secured some gear associated with a spare cooling unit housed on the truss.

 

Ninth and last EVA (to date) for Feustel: his career total is 61 hr 48 min. This puts him in third place for cumulative duration, behind Michael Lopez-Alegria (67 hr 40 min over ten EVAs) and Anatoli Solovyov (79 hr 51 min over sixteen EVAs.) Fifth and last (to date) for Arnold: his total is 32 hr 4 min.

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15 JUNE

 

2007 James Reilly & Daniel Olivas (STS-117/ISS)

 

Duration 7 hr 58 min

 

This EVA began with an unplanned repair to Atlantis: a small (8 by 10cm) section of thermal blanket had peeled away from one of the spacecraft's Orbital Manoeuvring System pods (the large units either side of the tail fin) and Olivas reattached it with staples and pins. Reilly then installed a hydrogen vent valve onto the Destiny Module: this would be a component of the future oxygen generation system. Once these tasks were complete the astronauts completed the retraction of the P6 solar array begun by Forrester and Swanson two days earlier.

 

The fifth and final EVA for Reilly: his career total amounts to 30 hr 43 min. Second EVA for Olivas.

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16 JUNE

 

1987 Yuri Romanenko & Aleksandr Leveykin (Mir Expedition 2)

 

Duration 3 hr 15 min

 

The cosmonauts added a second truss to the top of the one they had installed on 12 June and attached folded solar arrays to either side. The electrical systems were hooked up, then the structure was deployed to its full height of 10.6m. Each of the four array sections consisted of eight rectangular panels, with a total surface area of about 24 square metres; however, it would not be for another week that the work of connecting the new array to Mir's electrical system would be completed. When this was done, the station's available power supply would be increased by 2.4kW.

 

Fourth and last EVA for Romanenko, giving a career total of 10h 16m. Third and last for Leveykin: his total is 8h 48m.

 

 


1995 Vladimir Dezhurov & Gennadi Strekalov (Mir Expedition 18)

 

EVA cancelled

 

On 5 June two solar arrays on the Spektr Module had been deployed, but one failed to open properly resulting in it generating 20% less power than expected. An unrehearsed EVA was scheduled so that the array could be fully opened ready for the arrival of Atlantis in the first Shuttle-Mir docking, but Strekalov refused to take part as he felt the EVA was unnecessary and they were not sufficiently prepared. Dezhurov was Mission Commander but was making his first space flight and his attempts to persuade Strekalov (on his fifth mission) were unsuccessful. It was eventually decided that there was enough electrical power for the docking and the EVA was cancelled, but when they returned to Earth Strekalov was 'fined' the equivalent of $9,000 - fifteen percent of his payment for the mission. This, however, was overturned after he took RSC Energia to arbitration.

 

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17 JUNE

 

2007 Patrick Forrester & Steven Swanson (STS-117/ISS)

 

Duration 6 hr 29 min

 

The astronauts retrieved a video camera from a storage compartment on the Quest airlock and mounted it on the S3 Truss. They then returned to the drive-lock assembly which they had installed four days earlier to ensure that electronic commands were now being received properly. Once this had been established they removed the launch locks, allowing the joint to rotate the S3 Truss freely. Now, they cleared a path along the S3 for the Mobile Base System. Work had been carried out faster than anticipated, so the astronauts were able to perform some get-ahead tasks by installing a LAN cable on the Unity Node and opening the vent valve fitted by Reilly the day before, and attaching two orbital debris shield panels. However, they had to secure the shields in place with hooks rather than the intended fasteners.

 

Fourth and last EVA for Forrester, bringing his career total to 25 hr 30 min. Second EVA for Swanson.

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18 JUNE

 

1993 Gennadi Manakov & Aleksandr Poleshchuk (Mir Expedition 13)

 

Duration 5 hr 25 min

 

During the previous EVA on 19 April, it was discovered that one of the control handles for the Strela crane was missing: it had presumably come off and drifted away unnoticed. A replacement was delivered by Progress M-18 and was secured in place as the first task on this EVA. Solovyov had said at the end of the previous EVA that they would "be sure to screw the handle on tighter next time." With Strela fully operational, it was used to move the second electric drive for the solar arrays to the Kvant Module. The first drive had proven difficult to install but this time round there were no problems and the job was completed ahead of time, giving the cosmonauts the opportunity to send back television images of the exterior of the station.

 

Third and final EVA for Manakov: his career total is 13 hr 46 min. Second and final EVA for Poleshchuk: his total is 9 hr 58 min.

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19 JUNE

 

1973 Pete Conrad & Paul Weitz (Skylab 2)

 

Duration 1 hr 36 min

 

With Skylab now operating more or less as planned, the astronauts were able to carry out the scientific work that was the whole point of the mission. This EVA had been scheduled from the start, though Weitz replaced Kerwin in carrying it out. The astronauts changed out film cassettes on the solar telescopes, a task which took only a fraction of the time anticipated. NASA had learned from previous experience and Skylab was equipped with plenty of footholds so the crew could brace themselves properly. In addition, to help them move about, there were single and dual handrails, the latter resembling ladders without rungs. The astronauts found both designs easy to use. These were painted blue for visibility and provided with 'road signs' - alphanumeric designators so that the astronauts could identify exactly where they were on the structure. However, the blue paint faded rapidly in the bright sunlight and the road signs proved hard to read. Additional tasks carried out on the EVA involved the removal of space exposure samples and brush-cleaning the occulting disc on the White Light Coronograph, which was producing glare. Conrad then used a hammer to free a stuck relay on a circuit breaker.

 

Fourth and last EVA for Conrad (two of which were on the lunar surface) bringing his total to 12 hr 59 min. Second and final EVA for Weitz (his first being a Stand-up) giving a total of 2 hr 19 min.

 

 


2014 Aleksandr Skvortsov & Oleg Artemyev (ISS Expedition 40)

 

Duration 7 hr 23 min

 

The cosmonauts installed a communications antenna onto the Zvezda Module, a task which included connecting cables, removing protective covers and finally photographing their work. After a short rest they took swab samples from one of Zvezda's windows, then removed an orbital debris experiment and one for materials exposure. Finally they relocated a cargo boom to free up the area for future payload attachment work.

 

First EVA for both cosmonauts.

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20 JUNE

 

No EVAs on this date.

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21 JUNE

 

No EVAs on this date.

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22 JUNE

 

No EVAs on this date.

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23 JUNE

 

No EVAs on this date.

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24 JUNE

 

1991 Anatoli Artsebarsky & Sergei Krikalev (Mir Expedition 9)

 

Duration 4 hr 48 min

 

The main objective of this EVA was to repair the malfunctioning Kurs antenna on the Kvant Module, used for automatic rendezvous of docking spacecraft. The task was especially difficult because there were few handholds and foot restraints in the vicinity of the antenna, and the work involved small tools such as a dental mirror and would use many parts not intended for EVA handling. Nevertheless, the cosmonauts managed to restore the antenna to working condition, though they were forced to rest while Mir was on the Earth's night side as visibility was too poor for the delicate repairs. Once this had been completed, they assembled a prototype thermo-mechanical joint outside Kvant 2 in preparation for the installation of the Sofora truss. The joint had sleeve couplings made of titanium-nickel alloy which possessed a 'memory effect' that would shrink and snuggle tight when a hand-held heating device was trained on it.

 

First EVA for both cosmonauts

 

 

 
2004 Gennady Padalka & Michael Fincke (ISS Expedition 9)

 

Duration 14 min

 

The aim was to replace a malfunctioning circuit breaker, but the EVA had to be abandoned when Russian ground controllers observed that Fincke's primary oxygen bottle was depressurising too quickly. Repairs had previously been carried out to the space-suit but clearly had not been fully successful. The fault was eventually traced to the oxygen control lever and further maintenance was carried out.

 

Third EVA for Padalka; the first for Fincke.

 

 


2013 Fyodor Yurchikhin & Aleksandr Misurkin (ISS Expedition 36)

 

Duration 6 hr 34 min

 

The cosmonauts replaced a fluid flow regulator on the Zarya Module and removed the Photon-Gamma unit of the Molina-Gamma experiment, which measures gamma splashes and optical radiation during terrestrial thunderstorms, from a portable workstation on Zvezda. They also installed clamps for future power cables as an early step toward swapping the Pirs airlock with the Nauka multipurpose laboratory module. This was due for launch later in the year but successive delays meant that as of 2020 the module was not yet in orbit.

 

Sixth EVA for Yurchikhin; first for Misurkin.

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25 JUNE

 

1993 David Low & Peter Wisoff (STS-57)

 

Duration 5 hr 50 min

 

The flight plan called for this EVA only to be conducted if the mission was extended beyond the scheduled seven days. In the event, though two days were added, the EVA suddenly became a much higher priority when problems were encountered in retrieving the ESA's European Retrievable Carrier satellite (EURECA). The platform's antenna would not lock down, so securing it was made the primary task of the EVA. As a Spacehab module was being carried, Endeavour's cabin pressure could not be reduced from the normal one atmosphere so Low and Wisoff had to prebreathe for four hours before the EVA began. EURECA had already been grasped by the manipulator arm and Low pushed on the antenna while ground controllers closed the latches. With this task complete, the astronauts turned to the original objective of the EVA: testing equipment that would be used on future Hubble maintenance and ISS assembly missions. They took turns carrying each other while riding the arm to judge their ability to move large loads, used a foot restraint while working with tools, and tested safety tethers. While away from the payload bay, pointed at space, the astronauts got cold enough to shiver, and their hands became numb and painful. 

 

Low's only EVA; the first for Wisoff.

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