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Which wash, and how to?


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I'm keen to experiment with using washes to improve the finish of my models, so I would be very grateful for any tips on which wash(es) I should try - colour and brand - and how to get the best results. The models I make are mostly large scale WWII era aircraft, though I also do some vehicles for dioramas. Many thanks in advance for any help! 

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9 hours ago, torqueofthedevil said:

I'm keen to experiment with using washes to improve the finish of my models, so I would be very grateful for any tips on which wash(es) I should try - colour and brand - and how to get the best results. The models I make are mostly large scale WWII era aircraft, though I also do some vehicles for dioramas. Many thanks in advance for any help! 

Having spent far too much time on here,  one truism is everyone has their own quirks,  so what works for me, may not for you. 

 

You need to experiment.   

 

One piece of advice, avoid looking at models and ignore model fashion trends,  many techniques used well are subtle, but you can often see them overdone,  which I why I mention trend and fashion.

 

Less is usually more, and you need to study photos of the real thing and if possible, your subject, carefully.   

 

FWIW, when i forced my self to not procrastinate and dither, and just FINISH a model,  I made a wash using artists oil paint, diluted with zippo type lighter fuel. 

description and photos here

https://www.britmodeller.com/forums/index.php?/topic/235052380-hurricane-airfix-72nd-fabric-wing-mki-oob/&do=findComment&comment=3296243

I also used pastel chalk, and some neat oil paint,  if you read through the link it describes this, and has some reference photos.

 

None of what I used were commercial modelling specifics products.  

 

Have a look through Work In Progress threads and finished builds,  and if curious, ask questions or for clarifications of how something was achieved, folks here are happy to help.

 

One final thought,  if the techniques and materials you use, get you a result you are happy with, they are the "right" ones.   

 

cheers

T

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I've only seen the video on YouTube for Flory Models Clay Wash and it looks pretty amazing and forgiving, but have not given it a go myself.  As of late I am using Vallejo Model Wash.  Like all Vallejo it takes some getting used to and you cannot treat it as you would an oil or enamel wash.  It dries within 20 minutes or so and once it does, it is permanent.  Let's say I am doing a panel wash, I thin it with tap water, 3 parts H2O to one part wash and apply it to the panel lines on the subject that I previously applied a semi-gloss varnish to.  The wash flows pretty well but because it dries so fast I only work on small areas at a time.  I keep some clean water and a damp brush nearby to mop up any wash in areas that I don't want stained and remain always vigilant for any tide marks.  I have been satisfied with the results.  Model Wash also works well as a filter.  For an excellent YouTube tutorial on the product please see here: 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_4q9a4Mnjvc

Hope it helps! 

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I'm probably old school and a cheapskate but I make my own using enamel thinner and a drop of paint of whatever colour I need. Usually for a panel line wash, it's a very small amount of black or dark grey, for things like wheel wells I'll often use very dark brown..

 

I use enamel paints but my clear coats are acrylic. Never had any problems using an enamel wash over the acrylic clear coat. 

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On 2/24/2020 at 9:39 AM, Smithy said:

I'm probably old school and a cheapskate but I make my own using enamel thinner and a drop of paint of whatever colour I need. Usually for a panel line wash, it's a very small amount of black or dark grey, for things like wheel wells I'll often use very dark brown..

 

I use enamel paints but my clear coats are acrylic. Never had any problems using an enamel wash over the acrylic clear coat. 

Thanks Smithy, what ratio do you use for paint to thinner? 

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2 hours ago, torqueofthedevil said:

Thanks Smithy, what ratio do you use for paint to thinner? 

 

Just depends on how dark and concentrated I want the wash to be. For panel lines I use a very light wash as this looks more realistic and I'm not personally a fan of that so-called "Spanish School" of weathering. For other things like dirty wheel bays I'll use a bit more paint in the wash.

 

The beauty of making them yourself (apart from saving your hard earned cash) is that you can vary the concentration of the washes and obviously the colours.

 

I use a screwtop from a bottle, add thinner and then usually a drop or two of paint. Always start with less paint and work up until you get to what ratio you want because you can always add more paint, you can't however take it out!

 

It's super easy to do and because I use an acrylic clear coat if I make a mistake I can use a cotton bud dipped in clean enamel thinner to remove the wash and then start again.

 

Give it a go as it's a piece of cake!

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19 hours ago, Smithy said:

 

Just depends on how dark and concentrated I want the wash to be. For panel lines I use a very light wash as this looks more realistic and I'm not personally a fan of that so-called "Spanish School" of weathering. For other things like dirty wheel bays I'll use a bit more paint in the wash.

 

The beauty of making them yourself (apart from saving your hard earned cash) is that you can vary the concentration of the washes and obviously the colours.

 

I use a screwtop from a bottle, add thinner and then usually a drop or two of paint. Always start with less paint and work up until you get to what ratio you want because you can always add more paint, you can't however take it out!

 

It's super easy to do and because I use an acrylic clear coat if I make a mistake I can use a cotton bud dipped in clean enamel thinner to remove the wash and then start again.

 

Give it a go as it's a piece of cake!

Thank you, I will! Great information, much appreciated 

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Exactly what Troy said, there are a number of techniques, and I suspect we have our own favourite. Also depends on what the wash is to achieve.

 

I like to use pin wash as it puts it exactly where I want it under precise control (usually in panel lines, joints and corners), but sometimes use a build up over a wider area for shadowy or grubby corners. Tend to make them from a thinned colour, and apply lightly to reduce the effect.

Edited by Rob 1
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On 3/1/2020 at 6:05 PM, Rob 1 said:

Exactly what Troy said, there are a number of techniques, and I suspect we have our own favourite. Also depends on what the wash is to achieve.

 

I like to use pin wash as it puts it exactly where I want it under precise control (usually in panel lines, joints and corners), but sometimes use a build up over a wider area for shadowy or grubby corners. Tend to make them from a thinned colour, and apply lightly to reduce the effect.

Thanks Rob! 

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