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blackarrow

Weathering tools for a beginner

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Hello,

 

After a long break, I would like to continue working on some new models and experiment with weathering. I have Revell Aqua Color paint and Revell Weathering Set (6 different pigments). So far, I learned to apply paint correctly (since I don't have airbrush, I work with classic brushes only and few light coats) and do washing, I also experimented a little bit with applying mud. However, I would like to go further and make my future models more realistic (filters, varnish, chipping etc.) and I am mostly interested in armored vehicles.

 

As a start, I would like to have some basic tools, but I not sure what to buy. For example, I need basic brushes but I am not sure which kind and size. The same for filter colors, washing or varnish. I found for example a lot of quite inexpensive MIG products, but I am little bit lost. So, I need some basic information on tools I should buy at the very beginning, as well as some basic tutorials so I can freely experiment further.

 

Any suggests are welcomed. Thanks.

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You're wading into a subject with lots of techniques, products, and preferences. At the very least some wide brushes for your filters and varnishes. I really think you should go to YouTube, search for the technique you want to try first, and see how people are doing it. Eventually you'll see a pattern between different modelers and can decide what to buy to get similar results. 

 

With your acrylic paints, enamels weathering products and/or oil paints may be of interest to you.

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Hello,

 

Thanks for the help. I watched a few tutorials on Youtube and looked up catalogs of different companies. For the beginning, I think this would be appropriate:

 

Brushes: 00, 2, 4 round, 6 flat

 

Wash

Filter

Enamel thinner

 

Chipping color

Fuel Stains

 

Pigments (I got some old Revell pigments, 6 different)

Pigment fixer

 

What do you think?

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On 13/02/2020 at 21:00, blackarrow said:

However, I would like to go further and make my future models more realistic (filters, varnish, chipping etc.) and I am mostly interested in armored vehicles.

Be wary of modelling fashion,  and of modelling conventions, and looking at other models. 

By this, in the case of armour modelling,  armour plate does not rust when chipped, and tracks are made of Manganese Steel,

@Das Abteilung has made some excellent posts on these matters.

Quote

German gun barrels were factory-finished in a grey gloss lacquer not unlike Panzer Grey in shade.

 

The base colour of armour plate and cast armour was always a dark metallic brown: it could not possibly be otherwise.  The only variation was that face-hardened plate and castings were somewhat darker than rolled homogeneous plate (RHA), the latter being much preferred by Germany.  It did not (and could not possibly) wear to a silvery colour, but did develop a polished sheen from wear.  Because of the other elements in the alloy it did not rust readily and I applaud you for not being tempted to spatter it with rust spots or rusty areas.  Mild steel fittings and other parts would rust of course, and cause rust runs down the paint, and would wear to a bright metal colour.  The sheen on worn armour plate and track naturally catches the light in photos and this glint is commonly mistaken for it being a bright colour.  And many people assume that all steel is inherently a silvery colour.

 

German tracks all had a manganese content, decreasing as the war progressed.  This means they were never and could never be bright silvery metal or graphite/metallic grey, even on the wear points.  Their native colour was initially a mid metallic goldy-brown, but by later in the war this had become a somewhat browner colour as the manganese content decreased.  Again they developed a polished sheen in use but this was not silvery or graphite in colour.  The same is true for the guide horns and wear areas on the inside faces.  There isn't an easy match for that colour that I have found thus far Manganese tracks also did not rust easily, because of their inherent corrosion-inhibiting properties.  Initially their oxide was a mid grey-brown, later changing to a very dark brown.  Orange and red tones of rust would not be seen.  Shiny silver mild steel tracks would be a complete waste of time and have an incredibly short life, which is why no-one used them.

 

Congratulations on keeping the weld metal bright and not being tempted to rust it, which of course it never did.

 

By this, you will see many models, and youtube technique vids which show the opposite of what is described above, and while they are impressive displays of skill and techniques and materials,  they are as realistic as your average Hollywood film.... 

 

There are many products out there, often being variants of existing commoner items (like oil paint) packed up for modellers, which are then picked up or supplied for the use of those writing reviews or doing videos...

 

Bear in mind that if the materials and techniques you use get you the results you want,  they are the "right" techniques, but that will take some trial and error on your part to find what works for you.

 

HTH

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3 hours ago, Troy Smith said:

Be wary of modelling fashion,  and of modelling conventions, and looking at other models. 

By this, in the case of armour modelling,  armour plate does not rust when chipped, and tracks are made of Manganese Steel,

@Das Abteilung has made some excellent posts on these matters.

 

By this, you will see many models, and youtube technique vids which show the opposite of what is described above, and while they are impressive displays of skill and techniques and materials,  they are as realistic as your average Hollywood film.... 

 

There are many products out there, often being variants of existing commoner items (like oil paint) packed up for modellers, which are then picked up or supplied for the use of those writing reviews or doing videos...

 

Bear in mind that if the materials and techniques you use get you the results you want,  they are the "right" techniques, but that will take some trial and error on your part to find what works for you.

 

HTH

Seeming exception to the manganese steel tracks is the Panther. Apparently it had tracks made of Niresit (now called Niresist) which does not have the characteristic gold orangey colour.

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