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Scotsman07

Weathering Airliners

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Hello

 

I recently purchased some grey through to black pastels and weathering powders which I intend on having a go at grime and weathering effects on my Airliners. I’m not sure what’s the best technique to this.

 

My other concern is how I ‘seal’ in the pastels and weathering once it’s in the finished model without it smudging or transferring to areas that I don’t intend it to. Any help or tips would be greatly appreciated. 

 

Regards,

 

Alistair

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Alistair, it’s best to seal all forms of weathering with a clear coat. There are many products on the market and each modeller will have their own favourite blend or item. Personally I clear my models  prior to decalling (unless you already have a gloss or shiny finish), then reseal the decals with another coat or two of clear to protect them from the weathering stage. 
 

Having worked for an airline since I started employment, I can vouch that airliners do get dirty. It would also be wise to adopt the ‘less is more’ approach as although airliners are never pristine in service, they do get washed so don’t go crazy on those pastels, however tempting. 
 

Cheers and good luck.. Dave 

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Hi Dave,

 

I usually give my models a coat or 2 of Humbrol Clear coat once all the painting is complete and prior to decals being applied. I then go over it again with the Clear coat to seal the decals and then would be looking to weather. My fear is that the Humbrol Clear coat (being water based) would wash off the weathering effects when I go to ‘seal it’ once finished. 
 

I agree, I used to be Cabin Crew and I don’t think I ever saw a truly filthy aircraft, just some tatty ones that would show their age.

 

Thank you 😀.

 

Regards,

 

Alistair

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Yeah, I'd restrict it to paint fading and dirt streaks representing the build-up before washing. Not too many leaks and hydraulic fluid is purple (Skydrol), not red and is much harder to see. It's also nasty on paint (and skin and plastic and rubber and and and...), which is why leaks are quickly wiped up.

 

To answer your next question - it has a much higher flashpoint than the old mineral hydraulic fluids used on pre-1960s aircraft. The new mineral stuff is just as good as Skydrol (probably better, actually) but manufacturers have been slow to make the change due to commonality issues with their old aircraft models.

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Hello Alistair

Not exactly about pastels, but still ... Paint a NLG wheel hubs in their original colour, but have MLG wheel hubs in matt black. Unless an airliner in question just had her MLG wheels replaced, hubs should be covered with soot from use of brakes during landing. Cheers

Jure

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Hi Alistair,

Civil airliners get regular washes, the frequency varying from aircraft type or even operating environment; the main landing gears (MLG) and underside of the belly or wings being the dirtiest and streakiest; in my opinion the MLG wheels should not be painted black. The base colour, usually light grey or white, should receive a wash of black that can be built up to resemble heavy deposits of brake dust - wheels weather at different rates so vary this effect. The axle area or axle beams get particularly dirty on some types - CRJ700/900/1000 gears are filthy, Q400 less so.

Hydraulic leaks are usually cleaned up or rectified pretty quickly but can be quite messy; this is the result of a burst hydraulic hose on the NLG of a CRJ900 - 

6B969717-29E1-4173-A3A7-9F3E2F984204

 

I see lots of landing gears in my line of work and can attest that there is always something that is novel to see. 

 

 

 

 

 

Edited by Rickoshea52

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Hello

I have some close-up pictures but apparently I took them all either inside of a hangar or there was a wing shadow present ... So these two will have to do:

mRsg6Ra.jpg

The MLG wheel hubs above look fairly clean. The main two parts are gloss white and the smaller central cover is aluminum ...

4QGpAVf.jpg

... and this is how MLG wheel hubs look after a week or so of regular use with two or three cycles a day. Rickoshea52, I agree that there are always fifty shades of grey so to speak, but, at least to my eye, black wheel hub will not look out of place as long as it is in matt finish. Cheers

Jure

 

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