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Awesome 1/700 scale models by Dai Sasahara or how can to build models


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One Japanese ship modeler Dai Sasahara 笹原大 builds awesome and great models in 1/700 scale.

His works pushes the limits of the possible

This is real nanotechnology in modeling!

Everyone who makes models on a scale of 1/700 or 1/350 should get acquainted with his work and learn for yourself a lot of new and useful.

And inspire yourself to new projects

 

He wrote this books

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And I want to share and show his brilliant models for all of you

 

Battleship Mutsu 1933 1/700

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P.S. for moderators - If this topic is in wrong subforum, you can move them to the correct subforum.

Edited by SilverGhost
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There are modellers in Japan of all ages who frankly put us westerners to shame.

 

I've no idea how they achieve what they do, but it needs exposure like this if only to put a lid on certain types in the English speaking world that like to sagely advise everyone that the likes of Flyhawk and photo etch are "ruining the hobby" and such. This forum's not too bad for it but there are other places which are just an echo-chamber of people agreeing with each other that things were much better when model kits had no more than 25 parts and painting involved dipping the assembled kit into a can of Humbrol.

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That's top class modelling! Thanks for posting it - something to aspire to. They look like museum models magically reduced.

@SilverGhost - Your own models on scalemodels.ru are pretty nice too.

 

The book looks interesting but the only reference to it is from HLJ. I find them very difficult to deal with and it's out of stock anyway.

("Nanotechnology" is a misnomer - dimensions of less than 100 nanometres, A sheet of newspaper is about 100,000 nm thick.)

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8 hours ago, Jamie @ Sovereign Hobbies said:

There are modellers in Japan of all ages who frankly put us westerners to shame.

 

I've no idea how they achieve what they do, but it needs exposure like this if only to put a lid on certain types in the English speaking world that like to sagely advise everyone that the likes of Flyhawk and photo etch are "ruining the hobby" and such. This forum's not too bad for it but there are other places which are just an echo-chamber of people agreeing with each other that things were much better when model kits had no more than 25 parts and painting involved dipping the assembled kit into a can of Humbrol.

Jamie, I think that ideas are:

  • many practice (more than 50 or 100 complete models)
  • desire to do better than last time
  • no alcohol
  • healthy lifestyle and lots of seafood
  • slight nearsightedness in vision
  • good lighting of the workplace
  • very thin coat of paint
  • very thin brush. May be size "0000000000" (also known 0/10)
  • no CA glue
  • parts are glued to acrylic glue or varnish
  • no primer
  • using Tamiya engraving blades (0.1, 0.15, 0.2 mm) for panel lines
  • etc
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7 hours ago, Ed Russell said:

That's top class modelling! Thanks for posting it - something to aspire to. They look like museum models magically reduced.

@SilverGhost - Your own models on scalemodels.ru are pretty nice too.

 

The book looks interesting but the only reference to it is from HLJ. I find them very difficult to deal with and it's out of stock anyway.

("Nanotechnology" is a misnomer - dimensions of less than 100 nanometres, A sheet of newspaper is about 100,000 nm thick.)

Thank you Ed!

 

Here you can find two books

One in stock and one in backorder

https://1999.co.jp/eng/search?typ1_c=115&cat=book&target=Material&searchkey=Masaru+Sasahara

 

And both books you can find at Ebay, Rarebooks and Amazon 

https://www.ebay.com/sch/i.html?_from=R40&_trksid=m570.l1313&_nkw=Masaru+Sasahara&_sacat=0

 

 

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Those aircraft are about the quality I achieve. But mine are in 1/48.

Rigged, weathered and dropped flaps - in 1/700!

 

Incredible work! :shocked:

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My ghast is well and truly flabbered....

 

IanJ

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2 hours ago, Gorby said:

Those aircraft are about the quality I achieve. But mine are in 1/48.

Rigged, weathered and dropped flaps - in 1/700!

 

Incredible work! :shocked:

Yeah, it's crazy modeling😆

 

Next models

 

Light cruiser Abukuma 1/700

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heavy cruiser Aoba 1945 1/700

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If swearing was allowed on BM, I's be swearing!  Those are amazing works of craft and art...

Tim

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Nope. Fake. They are 1/35 scale and the world's most enormous thumb and 1 Yen coin.

 

But in all seriousness .... WOW. Simply staggering work (in any scale)

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15 minutes ago, NigelC said:

Nope. Fake. They are 1/35 scale and the world's most enormous thumb and 1 Yen coin.

 

But in all seriousness .... WOW. Simply staggering work (in any scale)

It's idea!

This is 5 Yen coin

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I think Dai has similar 1 Yen coin 🤣

 

 

Next model battleship-carrier Ise 1/700

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Truly inspiring work.  I especially like the first seaplane carrier whilst the detail in Akagi's rounddown supports is amazing in that scale. 

On 23/01/2020 at 11:07, Gorby said:

Rigged, weathered and dropped flaps - in 1/700!

And panel line washes!

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Astonishing - but also inspiring.  If he can do that kind of thing in 1/700, it spurs me on to keep trying stuff at 1/350.  I don't have half his talent, but at least I know it can be done...

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WOW! Only a couple thousand years of practice and I'll be there...

Why did they tie the logs to the wings of seaplanes stored on deck?

Thank you for posting!!

Richard

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1 hour ago, Richard502 said:

Why did they tie the logs to the wings of seaplanes stored on deck?

I wondered that as well. I assume it was to prevent damage to the wings.

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2 hours ago, Richard502 said:

WOW! Only a couple thousand years of practice and I'll be there...

Why did they tie the logs to the wings of seaplanes stored on deck?

Thank you for posting!!

Richard

Wing ailerons, stabilizers and rudder were fixed with bamboo boards to prevent damage from the effects of waves and wind when the seaplane was storaged at catapult or deck near the side of ship.

 

For example - Kawanishi E7K2 Alf at catapult of training cruiser IJN Kashii at Singapoore at first half of 1942

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And Aichi E13A1 Jake at seaplane transport Kamikawa-Maru at February 1943 near Aleutian islands (Kiska, Attu)

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Edited by SilverGhost
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