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1/48 - Supermarine Spitfire Mk.1 to Mk.V by Eduard - Mk.I/Ia released - Mk.IIa & b in December 2020


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WOW. I for one am impressed. I know this is only the renders, but it looks like they are one of the few to reproduce the domed rivets on the rear fuselage. They haven't done the overlapping panels (Special Hobby did this well). I hope they aren't going down the Tamiya path of just giving you a strip to put across the bottom of the panel over the upper fuel tank, as a representation of the deflection 'armour' panel that was put here - to me that is just lazy. The pictures suggest they might be. They have included the insulators for the IFF on the fuselage sides that will need to be filled for a Mk I but these will come into use for the inevitable Mk V series. I'll certainly be in for a few of these. 

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Hope Eduard will do another 20% discount day when the overtrees of this become available ūüôā I had a tough time last week, notto spend a fortune at the Eduard store. Guess in preparation I am going to sell some old MkI kits.

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That riveting looks interesting. If they can get those mushroom rivets to scale, then maybe there will be overlapped panels too?

 

Trevor

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If it's got raised rivets, then it's definitely not for me, I'll stick with the Airfix and Tamiya kits. I hate raised rivet detail with a vengeance, no matter whether it's accurate or not. I can only conclude it's because I'm a child of the sixties and spent much of my youth and early adulthood sanding raised rivets off old Airfix kits.....

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Just looking over those CAD images, looks pretty nice, though why have they got the reinforcing strips over the top of the wheel wells, I though these where only fitted to some Mk.V's?

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16 minutes ago, Acinonyx Jubatus said:

See post #50 on the previous page, it is explained there

That's what I was reading, that's why I've questioned it. Eduard are saying they were fitted to some Mk.I's and I'm saying I thought they were only fitted to some Mk.V's, never seen them on a Mk.I, though I am no Spitfire expert. I would love to see evidence of that.

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The strips were fitted during the war as noted by Eduard, and fitted to surviving Mk.1s though admittedly unlikely in front line use by then.  Hence their appearance on some preserved aircraft, even on one wing but not the other!

I really like Eduard Spitfire kits, and will probably get a Mk.I though my stash has more Spitfires than seems sensible already...

Edited by malpaso
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11 hours ago, malpaso said:

The strips were fitted during the war as noted by Eduard, and fitted to surviving Mk.1s though admittedly unlikely in front line use by then.  Hence their appearance on some preserved aircraft, even on one wing but not the other!

I really like Eduard Spitfire kits, and will probably get a Mk.I though my stash has more Spitfires than seems sensible already...

For Eduard to do it I'm guess they have found at least one Mk.I with them so it will be interesting what markings they come up with for it. I just hope that if they are going to that much effort that we get some PR versions, a IV/V and a XI would be nice!

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29 minutes ago, Tbolt said:

For Eduard to do it I'm guess they have found at least one Mk.I with them so it will be interesting what markings they come up with for it.[...]

Yup, they have. The one in Cosford, which received them after being withdrawn from the frontline service:lol:

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45 minutes ago, DominikS said:

Yup, they have. The one in Cosford, which received them after being withdrawn from the frontline service:lol:

Yes I hope they haven't modelled it on this one¬†ūüėÜ

 

james-may-s-life-size.jpg

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Whilst having some free time today for obvious reasons, I did a bit of research online looking for early spitfires with these reinforcing strips

The only aircraft I could find so fitted after an hour or so searching are

IWM Mk1a R6915, info from IWM website

BBMF Mk IIa P7530, pictures sourced from internet

Both these aircraft have a history of battle damage, I couldn't comment on when the  current wings  may have been fitted to these aircraft, either in service or after preservation

As said previously the aircraft at Cosford

I am not really a spitfire fan but looking through my limited reference books I was unable to find any photos of these reinforcing strips fitted to Mk1s

I was unable to find any reference to these strips in Trevor Snowden's book Spitfire revisited published 2012

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23 minutes ago, Acinonyx Jubatus said:

I did a bit of research online looking for early spitfires with these reinforcing strips

The only aircraft I could find so fitted after an hour or so searching are

IWM Mk1a R6915, info from IWM website

BBMF Mk IIa P7530, pictures sourced from internet

Both these aircraft have a history of battle damage, I couldn't comment on when the  current wings  may have been fitted to these aircraft, either in service or after preservation

both ended up in Training Command, as did most survivors once no longer fit for frontline service.  The reinforcing strips were a common retrofit.   In the case of R6915,  this is the original traning command paint. 

 

P3903,  on display in Chicago, is another Ex BoB plane that ended up in Training Command,  again still in TC colours, and with the strips retrofitted

IMG_1153.jpg&key=fc74ed6b5dfe48398f60d06

 

more pics here

https://www.britmodeller.com/forums/index.php?/topic/59537-the-definitive-spitfire-mk1-thread/&do=findComment&comment=2604888

 

Nearest you will get to a definitive answer. 

  

On 10/10/2015 at 10:39, Edgar said:

The stiffeners were fitted, to the Va & Vb, from 16-7-42. Any Mk.I & 2 aircraft, in training units, which needed a damaged wing to be replaced, usually had the Mk.V versions fitted.

The Vc also had strengthening fitted, but it was normally internal to the wells, and was fitted from 14-8-42.

Given the appearance on the wings of the ex Training Command Mk.I's,  I suspect this was retrofitted when getting a major service.

 

from

https://www.britmodeller.com/forums/index.php?/topic/234989946-spitfire-wings-fins/

 

 

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Idle thought during "Lockdown".

 

Nice if Eduard brought out an early "rag wing" two bladed wooden prop Hurricane I to go with the early Spitfire. 

 

Very few mush-head rivets to worry about.

 

The record breaking Edinburgh - London aircraft would be nice

 

Dennis

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18 hours ago, Acinonyx Jubatus said:

Whilst having some free time today for obvious reasons, I did a bit of research online looking for early spitfires with these reinforcing strips

The only aircraft I could find so fitted after an hour or so searching are

IWM Mk1a R6915, info from IWM website

BBMF Mk IIa P7530, pictures sourced from internet

Both these aircraft have a history of battle damage, I couldn't comment on when the  current wings  may have been fitted to these aircraft, either in service or after preservation

As said previously the aircraft at Cosford

I am not really a spitfire fan but looking through my limited reference books I was unable to find any photos of these reinforcing strips fitted to Mk1s

I was unable to find any reference to these strips in Trevor Snowden's book Spitfire revisited published 2012

 

18 hours ago, Troy Smith said:

both ended up in Training Command, as did most survivors once no longer fit for frontline service.  The reinforcing strips were a common retrofit.   In the case of R6915,  this is the original traning command paint. 

 

P3903,  on display in Chicago, is another Ex BoB plane that ended up in Training Command,  again still in TC colours, and with the strips retrofitted

 

more pics here

https://www.britmodeller.com/forums/index.php?/topic/59537-the-definitive-spitfire-mk1-thread/&do=findComment&comment=2604888

 

Nearest you will get to a definitive answer. 

  

Given the appearance on the wings of the ex Training Command Mk.I's,  I suspect this was retrofitted when getting a major service.

 

from

https://www.britmodeller.com/forums/index.php?/topic/234989946-spitfire-wings-fins/

 

 

Thanks for the info guys. I hadn't seen that comment from Edgar before and didn't think the museum aircraft were "authentic". At least the strips should be easy to remove.

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The Spitfire Mk.IIa at the Australian War Memorial in Canberra, Australia, also has the reinforcing strips fitted, along with a couple of other modifications from its wartime service.  Details of the aircraft taken from description on AWM website:

 

Description

Spitfire Mark IIa all-metal single engined, single seat low wing monoplane fighter aircraft, registration number P7973. It is fitted with a Mk V spinner and Rotol RS5/24 variable pitch propellor. The propellor appears to be a Jablo type (fabric covered wood).

 

History / Summary

The Supermarine Spitfire is a British single-seat fighter aircraft that was used by the Royal Air Force and many other Allied countries including the RAAf during and after the Second World War.

The Spitfire was built in many variants, using several wing configurations, and was produced in greater numbers than any other British aircraft. It was also the only British fighter to be in continuous production throughout the war.

This particular machine saw service with 222 (Natal) Squadron RAF, 452 Squadron RAAF in mid 1941, and 313 (Czech) Squadron , as well as with a number of operational training units and the Central Gunnery school. During its service with 452 Squadron it was flown by one of Australia's greatest air aces, 'Bluey' Truscott. He gained his first 'kill' in this aircraft. Whilst being flown by a Czech pilot Sgt Mrtvy over France in September 1941 it hit a telegraph pole, with half a meter of the pole embedding itself in the aircraft's port wing.

It was selected for the AWM in 1944, and shipped to Australia in 1945. It is unique in retaining its original Second World War paint scheme.

 

 

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The BOBF Spitfire II also has them

 

Trevor

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That looks brilliant. I really like the blend of both raised and recessed rivet detail. It'll take some very careful dry brushing to make the latter 'pop' but I think it would look really good in the end. Looking forward to this.

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5 minutes ago, Nocoolname said:

I really like the blend of both raised and recessed rivet detail. It'll take some very careful dry brushing to make the latter 'pop

Why do you want to make a 1/48 recessed representation of a flush rivet "pop"?  If anything it wants filling.

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2 minutes ago, Work In Progress said:

 

Why do you want to make a 1/48 recessed representation of a flush rivet "pop"?  If anything it wants filling.

Because it's my artwork and I like it that way? :hmmm:

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  • Homebee changed the title to 1/48 - Supermarine Spitfire Mk.1 to Mk.V by Eduard - Mk.I/Ia released - Mk.IIa & b in December 2020

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