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Special Hobby Super Mystere B2 (J52-engine) 'FAH 2002' Fuerza Aerea Hondurena 1/72 - 15th June - tackling the Shafrirs again!


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Hi Wez!  @Wez

 

My approach, I think, will be:

 

1. Carefully remove the "filler" between the scuff plates and the inner faces of the tailplanes

2. Fit those to the tailplane tabs

3. Square off the tabs ready to take a pin

4. Protect the detail around the scuff plates and sand the plates off

5. Fill the tab slot in the fin with card and/or sprue gloop

6. Drill a hole in that for the pin

 

Would that work?

 

Martin

 

 

 

 

Edited by RidgeRunner
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3 hours ago, Vultures1 said:

Nice progress being made there.¬† I particularly liked the "NOSE WEIGHT!" reminder taped to the fuselage ūüôā

:) it is one of those things that I might forget in my haste and excitement ;)

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19 minutes ago, RidgeRunner said:

Hi Wez!  @Wez

 

My approach, I think, will be:

 

1. Carefully remove the "filler" between the scuff plates and the inner faces of the tailplanes

2. Fit those to the tailplane tabs

3. Square off the tabs ready to take a pin

4. Protect the detail around the scuff plates and sand the plates off

5. Fill the tab slot in the fin with card and/or sprue gloop

6. Drill a hole in that for the pin

 

Would that work?

 

Martin

 

 

 

 

It's worth a try - do you have a fall-back plan?  I'm assuming you'll replace the scuff plates?

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On 1/6/2020 at 1:14 PM, RidgeRunner said:

I think I will cut out the scuff plates (as you call them), re-position and fill around.

Martin,

 

Just now¬† caught this WIP. I had a brainstorm (More like a squall, actually!) regarding your tailplanes. You could scribe around the edge of the scuff plates on either side of the fin until the scuff plate comes entirely free of the fin. Cement the scuff plate nose up, using the bottom rear edge and the top front edge of the fin as the gluing surface. Cut a piece of thin plasticard to fill the openings revealed by the angled scuff plate and sand flush. Then all you have to do is attach¬†the tailplanes and fill the seams. If they had only molded the fin in two halves, this would have been a whole lot easier, as you could cut the¬†scuff plates off, attach and fill the tailplanes, fill the openings with plasticard and then¬†glue¬†the tailplanes/scuffplates back on at the desired angle! (Why do we do insane things like this to a perfectly good kit? Oh yeah, I forgot- you want to make a replica, not just¬†a model!)¬†ūüėú

Mike

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Oh yes. I forgot to say that @Wez ;). My ultimate fall back is to try Stuarts idea - basically the same but using card and filler instead.

Edited by RidgeRunner
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1 minute ago, RidgeRunner said:

Oh yes. I forgot to say that @Wez ;). My ultimate fall back is to try Stuarts idea - basically the same but using card and filler instead.

It's good to have a fall-back

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2 minutes ago, 72modeler said:

Martin,

 

Just now¬† caught this WIP. I had a brainstorm (More like a squall, actually!) regarding your tailplanes. You could scribe around the edge of the scuff plates on either side of the fin until the scuff plate comes entirely free of the fin. Cement the scuff plate nose up, using the bottom rear edge and the top front edge of the fin as the gluing surface. Cut a piece of thin plasticard to fill the openings revealed by the angled scuff plate and sand flush. Then all you have to do is attach¬†the tailplanes and fill the seams. If they had only molded the fin in two halves, this would have been a whole lot easier, as you could cut the¬†scuff plates off, attach and fill the tailplanes, fill the openings with plasticard and then¬†glue¬†the tailplanes/scuffplates back on at the desired angle! (Why do we do insane things like this to a perfectly good kit? Oh yeah, I forgot- you want to make a replica, not just¬†a model!)¬†ūüėú

Mike

Hmmm .... That was my original idea, Mike :). If it worked it would certainly retain more detail. Thanks for that.

 

Martin

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18 minutes ago, RidgeRunner said:

I see you are up and about, Mike @72modeler. Do you know - were these Super Mysteres overhauled in San Antonio midway through their FAH careers? Do you know? Certainly it was in the US.

Yep- IIRC 21 ex-Israeli Super Mysteres were shipped to Hondo, TX, during 1976-78, where they were overhauled, updated, painted, and delivered to  the Honduran AF. I can confirm this as I saw them in a knocked-down state in hangars  while I was there for a CAF airshow. A lot of MAP aircraft were cycled through Hondo over the years as the base was very large, had unused shops and hangars, and was off the beaten track. I wanted to take photos for modeling projects, but got chased out by a security type who told me they were "F-100's"  I guess he thought I was a dumb  bunny, and wasn't real happy with me when I told him I knew  they were ex IAF Super Mysteres- you could still see the national insignia and IAF colors....moral- don't mess with a modeling maniac!

 

Also, all of the Slingsby Fireflies that were bought by the USAF ATC were parked in outdoor storage at Hondo, as the USAF retired them after a couple of fatal accidents- I think they were scrapped, due to liability issues if they were surplussed and sold on the civilian market.

Mike

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An hour or two toiling over the SMB2 (after finishing the decaling of the Mig and so detail work on a Mustang) and the job in hand was the fin and the tailplanes. I started off following my original plan, and Mike's @72modeler, but I quickly realised that the cutting would damage a fair degree of the surrounding detail. So, that plan was consigned to the bin! I therefore returned to my other alternative, which is part Wez's @Wez idea. That is to remove the inner "sheath" that part covers the locating tab for each tailplane. This could alternativly be created (as Stuart @Courageous, said) with card and filler. I thought, though, that'd give it a go.  There was nothing to lose! Maybe my finger tips with the Swann Morton, of course!  So, with the "sheaths" removed they then slip over the tabs

 

 

IMG_1536

   

It was then to tackle the sanding of the scuff plates. I masked over to minimise overrun of the sanding sticks and set about it. After a while, using various grades of stick, I got to this stage

 

IMG_1538

 

You can see the damage I had already inflicted on the kit when I tried to get the entire tail assembly out of the fin. So, there was only one way to go as I need a solid infill for the hole and rod that I will fit. The only way ahead for me - Sprue Gloop. It needs a bit of masking to avoid spillage and stringing across other details but it is a great filler (in my view). I started by masking the central slot:

 

IMG_1540

 

Then, once filled, I removed the inner tape strips so that I could fill my knife cuts. It ended up like this:

 

IMG_1541

 

IMG_1543

 

I then cemented the "sheaths" to the inner faces of the tailplanes and these, together with the gloop filler, will be left to cure for at least a day.

 

The next task was to close up the fuselage, which was more tricky than I expected. I had thought that the fit was very good. However, after adding weight in the nose, I dry fitted again and the small gap ahead of the canopy was still there. I tried sanding the internals a bit but nothing would resolved it. So, there was nothing more to do than get it together and deal with the small gap once cured. Oddly I fitted the intake surround and it fits so maybe there is just a poor join at that point? Or have I missed something? Once cured I'll fill with Gloop, which will add strength to the join. 

 

IMG_1546

 

Thats it for today - work beckons! I'll be back soon with the clean up of the fin, the making of the new scuff plates, etc.

 

Martin

 

 

Edited by RidgeRunner
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Fortune favours the brave Martin!

 

It looks:

 

1.  Brutal

2.  Beautifully simple.

 

Don't forget, when you make replacement scuff plates they have chamfered edges.

 

Good luck!

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I hope so, Stuart! It looks worse than it needed to be because of my initial foray in to the earlier "solution". ;)

 

Thanks Wez. Got it! :)

 

It would have been so un-necessary if SH had realised the key feature of the SMB2. In fact other manufacturers are equally complicit in that they never consider these things (how the aircraft are typically sat at rest, which is how most models are built). 

 

Martin

Edited by RidgeRunner
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On 1/10/2020 at 10:31 AM, RidgeRunner said:

In fact other manufacturers are equally complicit in that they never consider these things (how the aircraft are typically sat at rest,

Same exact problem with the Fujimi A-4 Skyhawks, but at least they molded the fin with each fuselage half, so it's a much easier fix, but like the B2, the stabs drop down when the hydraulics bleed off after shutdown. Really adds realism to a model, though.

Mike

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Well, I think I've got this fin and tailplane under control. From where I left off previously the first job was to clean up the faces of the fin where the moulded scuff plate had been. Again I protected detail where I could by applying Tamiya tape. As I said before, it would much less messy if I hadn't ventured down my other solution's route. So, I progessively reduced sanding sticks from coarse, through Medium to Fine and Extra Fine:

 

IMG_1571

  

This is prior to a wash with soap and water, vigourously applied with an old toothbrush.

 

Then I needed to measure and cut out the scuff plates from Plasticard. Then they needed to be cleaned. Before cemented them I needed to square off the inner faces of each tailplane. Thereafter it was a matter if marking out a centreline and cementing each to scuff plate to its respective tailplane. Before cementing, I should say, I gave the plates rounded "corners", scribed a panel line (per the original) and slightly chamfered edges (thanks @wez). 

 

IMG_1572

 

IMG_1573

 

IMG_1575

 

Then, after a period of curing I set about getting them drilled and pinned. I needed, of course to know where to drill the fin. This was simply a matter of: 1) knowing where the original plate sat and 2) where I need it to be. I then drew centrelines between each extreme point of the plate and where they intersect is the drill point. For the holes I started with a .5mm drill to get a pilot hole. My plan was then to drill those holes out to .8mm so that I can use .8mm stryrene rod to support the assembly. I've used these sizes of material before for my F-100s and previous SMB2. It was then just a matter of dry fitting and .... bingo! 

 

IMG_1578

 

They'll do for now. I need to do further cleaning up of the fin and tailplanes/Scuff plates. At least I can now progess......

 

Martin

 

 

 

 

 

Edited by RidgeRunner
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It was easier than I expected, Wez :)

 

I will need to tackle that nose area next. As you can see, I got some cement run under the tape :(

Edited by RidgeRunner
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Thanks Stuart. You are right, of course. It wasn't easy just daunting. As you said before, and Mike (@72modeler) also, it is a wrench to take a saw, sander, knife, etc to a perfectly detailed kit. In this case the detail was great but the design was a bit off. Today she is sat with wings now attached, awaiting curing. It'll be a few days before I can get back to her now as I am a way for a few days for work. 

 

Martin 

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Now, don't you feel better, Martin? The new stabs and scuff plates look a treat, as you say on your side of the pond. Looking good! They will add a lot of character to the finished build. It would have been so easy for SH to have molded the stabs and scuff plates as separate parts to begin with; wish kitmakers would understand the  control surfaces, flaps, speed brakes, blow-in doors, etc. are always deployed or deflected as a characteristic of some airplanes when at rest. (Yes, I know it's not a perfect world, but some kit makers get these little details right). Can't wait to see the finished product- are you out of the country this week?

Mike

 

BTW- just now got the new-tool Airfix Mig-17 and ArmaHobby Hurricane Mk IIc- both are very, very nice! The customary scramble for schemes and decals will now commence!

Edited by 72modeler
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8 hours ago, 72modeler said:

are you out of the country this week?

Hi Mike? Yes, I'm away in Milan-Malpensa Thursday-Friday. I'll get itchy fingers as I have four builds sat painted, two of them decalled and one ready for decals when I return, plus the SMB2. :)

 

Martin

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Sorry Its a bit slow. I have ordered a few bits, though. From Eduard I have some nice looking Shafrirs and some Zuni pods. Despite the great kit Kit inclusions of MERs and Napalm tanks the FAH didnt use them. At least, I'm told they didn't. I'm happy to be corrected, though. What I do have is the nice in service image of a FAH SMB2 with the Shafrirs and Zunis! And I like it :). They're quite pricey, being Eduard, but I justified them to myself on the basis of building an improved FAH SMB2 over my last attempt. :)

 

Martin

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