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Ed Russell

Buried aircraft

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I am a little sceptical about the supposed presence of lots of asbestos in the Mil Mi-24 Hind. What purpose would it have served? A fire-retardant layer around the fuel-tanks, maybe? Methinks this could be an official excuse, as having the gunships just sitting on the air-base could have been an embarrassment to the Australian government.

 

I guess we'll never know the truth on this one....

 

Chris. 

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You'll be surprised where asbestos can turn up on an airframe. We had to engage with the manufacturers to identify Jaguar components that contained it; the list ran to hundreds and it doesn't always come down to the asbestos tape or firewall material that you'd immediately think of

 

Asbestos was used as a binding material in the fuel tank sealant (PRC) and was also found in the adhesive used to bond the honeycomb skins together pre 1974. We had to include refernces in the Repair manuals to warn maintainers to take appropriate precautions if they had to drill into honeycomb structure. Also found in gaskets and within individual electrical components. I'd image Eastern Bloc designs may have had a more cavalier attitude to Elf n safety

 

John

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Posted (edited)

On search in Google: "Асбест в Ми-24" find only

"Mi-4A helicopter.  Technical description
 V.P. Lapishev2013 Technology & Engineering"

in this manual have link on next text:
 "... mesh filter LOCCHUPZ;  23 — gasoline pressure sensor;  24 — three-line ... exhaust manifold with heat-resistant steel casing with asbestos gasket"

he is here somewhere: 

https://books.google.ru/books?id=pbb-AgAAQBAJ&pg=PA68&lpg=PA68&dq=асбест+в+ми-24&source=bl&ots=CFnu0b3IB1&sig=ACfU3U1K4YCpYw1HZwbGO91N3FgRBBJrhw&hl=ru&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwjKqdeUpazoAhXj5aYKHdYLCasQ6AEwEXoECAYQAQ#v=onepage&q=асбест в ми-24&f=false

but where specifically I have not found.

Of course maybe in Mi-24 contain more details with  asbest, but but in order to say this, one must definitely read the Technical Description for the Design and Repair of Mi-24.

 

B. w., the Russian GOST (ГОСТ) standard refers only to asbestos material

amphibolasbest

as hazardous.

 

Chrysotile asbestos

considered harmless.  Moreover, most of the roofs in Russia are built using coatings containing asbestos and there is even a city called Asbest where asbestos has been mined since ancient times.

As they write on the Internet about the dangers of asbestos, asbestos dust that has got into the lungs is dangerous for a person .... but what needs to be done in the museum so that a significant amount of asbestos dust gets into the air from the Mi-24 ..... museum visitors will cut  Mi-24 circular saw? 

 

Such visitors are called vandals, but

I do not regret about vandal.

 

B.R.

Serge

Edited by Aardvark

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On 1/3/2020 at 2:37 PM, Wafu said:

the Welsh armed forces

The Flying Red Dragons...

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Posted (edited)

Regarding Asbestos.  I worked on many 1970's built ships and the had everything made of asbestos.  Even things like doors and desks were wood veneer over asbestos sheet.

 

In a helicopter I'd imagine the sound deadening mat, gaskets, wiring looms would all contain it.

 

Now I agree that it's total BS why this can't be a static exhibit, especially in Australia where Asbestos was mined openly for decades.  Asbestos only gets you if you disturb it.

 

But given the following formula:

 

SC x N2

--------   = Likelyhood of displaying aircraft

    F

 

Where S= stupidity of administrator  N=Number of visitors C=cost of potential litigation F=amount of concern that S has for the likes of you and me wanting to see this as an exhibit (also known as number of flips given)

 

You see that any mention of the A word means no!

Edited by Mike
Please don't swear on the forum - even disguised.

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45 minutes ago, At Sea said:

cost of potential litigation

Welcome to new wonderful world lawyers😁....but why

"C=cost of potential litigation" cannot be completely excluded by taking a simple written obligation with a warning about the presence of asbestos, the danger of asbestos and the refusal of claims in the case of continued inspection of the Mi-24, of course I remember about factor 

53 minutes ago, At Sea said:

S= stupidity of administrator

but it can also be additional money - "A visitor paying this fee to view the Mi-24 , understands the possible danger to himself due to the presence of asbestos, therefore, he confirms the rejection of any claims if he is damaged" or something like that made up by good lawyers.  This should reduce the factor

"cost of potential litigation" to "0".

 

B.R.

Serge

 

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On 1/25/2020 at 9:13 AM, Bell209 said:

You mean where can you see an F-111? Several museums in the US (The Museum of the USAF has three), the South Australian Aviation Museum, Queensland Air Museum, RAAF Museum (F-111C and G), Australian War Memorial (not on permanent display yet), Northern Territory Aviation Museum, RAAF Base Wagga main gate, RAAF Base Amberley main gate, RAAF Amberley Aviation Heritage Centre, Fighter World (RAAF Base Williamtown) and the Evans Head Aviation Heritage Museum.

RAFM Cosford - Cold War Exhibition (F-111F)

 

IWM Duxford - American Air Museum (F-111E)

 

RAF Lakenheath - Memorial Park (F-111F)

 

 

The F's are ex-Lakenheath birds and the E is ex-Upper Heyford. All three are (were - Quarantine!) on public display. The only other F-111 remenant in the UK is an escape capsule from an F-111F, which sits next to the 'E' at Duxford.

 

Cheers,

 WV908

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1 minute ago, EwenS said:

There is also an F-111E escape capsule at the Dumfries and Galloway Aviation Museum.

 

http://www.dumfriesaviationmuseum.com/f-111e-escape-capsule/

 

It's a bit bare though.

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On ‎3‎/‎21‎/‎2020 at 6:21 PM, 12jaguar said:

You'll be surprised where asbestos can turn up on an airframe. We had to engage with the manufacturers to identify Jaguar components that contained it; the list ran to hundreds and it doesn't always come down to the asbestos tape or firewall material that you'd immediately think of

 

Asbestos was used as a binding material in the fuel tank sealant (PRC) and was also found in the adhesive used to bond the honeycomb skins together pre 1974. We had to include refernces in the Repair manuals to warn maintainers to take appropriate precautions if they had to drill into honeycomb structure. Also found in gaskets and within individual electrical components. I'd image Eastern Bloc designs may have had a more cavalier attitude to Elf n safety

 

John

And water extractor gaskets …..

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