Jump to content
This site uses cookies! Learn More

This site uses cookies!

You can find a list of those cookies here: mysite.com/cookies

By continuing to use this site, you agree to allow us to store cookies on your computer. :)

Sign in to follow this  
albergman

Scratch Building Wire Wheels

Recommended Posts

I was asked recently on another forum to share my technique for making wire wheels and I'm happy to do that but I would prefer to have it here on Britmodeller where there are probably more people who might use it. 

I don't have a collection of pictures taken for this express purpose so I'm using pictures I've saved over many different wheel projects and there may not always be clear continuity ... sorry about that.   

The wheels are a bit tricky to shape and the main pieces are best produced on a metal lathe but creative users might find alternate ways and I actually made quite a few before I bought a proper lathe.

 

                        DISCLAIMER

 

I have stated my position re: scratch building that it is the "finding of a way" to do things that interests me and my measurements may not be as precise as others may want and, more to the point, I don't care much if a wheel ends up with more or less spokes than the correct 72 or whatever.   The technique I use here can produce a wheel of absolute correctness if that is your desire ... "Have at it Hoss" as someone used to say. 

There are 3 parts to the wheel: an outer rim, an inner wiring "loom" and a central hub.   They all fit together precisely and, when laced with wire, I think they produce a passable wheel and certainly good enough for my level of builds.   

49274093997_ca800ae6a2_c.jpg

 

First up is the diagram I use to pencil in all the dimensions needed for any sized wheel.  I start with the outer rim dimension "A" as that is the easiest one to determine and then try and measure "D" from scaled photos or plans.   From there I can work out the various others and fill in my chart.

The red represents the outer rim, blue is the wiring "loom" and green is the hub.

 

49273430613_9bcec283fa_c.jpg

 

The outer rim is machined, polished and parted (cut off) from a solid aluminum rod ...

 

49273901391_a43c414ffa_o.jpg

 

The inner wiring loom is basically a shallow dish ...

 

49274102657_658c2b3eb0_o.jpg

 

Once parted off from the main rod I measure off a number of marks, 36 for a 72 spoke wheel, as 2 spokes will project from each slot.   Revise your number accordingly ... Ignore the hub that's on this loom for now.

 

49273905006_fb326e1011_o.jpg

 

and cut a shallow slot at each one using a fine stone disk or a toothed cutting disk in a Dremel.

 

49273907411_a3629beea8_z.jpg   49274107967_ae3c440e61_z.jpg

 

Note that there is a tiny "lip" on the end of each upright piece.   This is needed to keep the wire from sliding off.   The loom on the right was an experiment and has way too many slots ... ignore.

Suggestions:  Cut the slots to be as shallow as possible to hold 2 wraps of your wire.  This will give the tidiest look when the loom is fitted into the rim.   Also when setting dimensions on the chart leave enough metal so that the upright prongs are strong enough to take the pull exerted when lacing.   You don't want them snapping off.

Next I turn a piece which becomes the central hub around which the wire will be laced.   I usually include the "knock off" spinner as part of it but it could be something that is affixed at the end.   Note: the knock off is turned as a disk on the lathe (like one of the pictures above) then material removed to leave only the two or 3 lugs.

 

49273441763_ea637677db_o.jpg   49278130523_5700896816_z.jpg

 

The hub has a tiny cylinder at its lower end (under the dirty fingernails) which fits snugly into the hole in the wiring loom ...

Note: next picture the slots haven't been cut yet and the outer disk of the hub hasn't been shaped for lugs.   The hub gets sealed in with a drop af Crazy glue.  It's not immediately apparent here but the hub has 2 recessed sections where the wire will traverse and give the appearance of 2 levels of spokes ... Inner and outer.

 

49274112092_818e8c9ce8_w.jpg

 

Now I choose an appropriate size wire to replicate a spoke in the scale needed and this is a matter of personal preference.  

I've collected quite a variety of wires over the years as I learned what made the best spokes.   If it's too stiff it won't bend around the prongs and won't give you a very straight spoke and may even bend the prong as you pull it tight.  So you want something fairly flexible and has a diameter close to the spoke you want to make.

My best source for wires has become one of the specialty stores that supply the beading hobby ... that's where people string beads on wire to make bracelets and necklaces.  My local store has an amazing array of wires ... check them out.

 

 

LACING THE SPOKES:

 

Suggestions:

 

I start by maybe glueing the back of the loom to a scrap block of wood which I fasten into my vise and that leaves both hands free to work the wire.   I like to use a dental pick to move the wire into the slot and generally handle the wire with it.

I tie a tight knot in the end of the wire and slide it into any slot (knot outside) then begin to lace it around the lower recess of the hub and out of a slot in the opposite side.  Move to the next slot and bring it back across to the starting side.   Repeat till the lower level slots each have a wire in them then, start the process over but using the upper recess.

This next picture shows the lower level (inside) row of spokes in place.   I next use the same slots and wire the outer spokes around the upper recess.   This is a wheel for a rather small model and I've reduced the number of slots to avoid having an over-crowded look when it's all done.   Your mileage may vary.

 

49273918976_1490daf91e_c.jpg

 

When finished wiring I run the wire along the outside of the loom and secure it with a drop of glue.

The loom should look like this when both layers are done ...

The whole wiring process takes 5 minutes once you have the knack.

 

49274118452_c625cc36d2_c.jpg

 

The loom is now ready to be capped by the outer rim.

 

49274118237_6537625a2e_c.jpg

 

This is where my recommendations for cutting shallow slots in the loom come into effect.   The deeper the slot the more obvious the hole.   

 

49273448213_cf4cb9cbd6_c.jpg

 

That just about completes the wired wheel and we are now ready to fit a tire.

Tires:   I turn my tires on the lathe using a composite material made for the pattern making industry.   Mine is called Renshape which is also known as Ureol.  I suspect that a decent tire could be made from various materials ... even wood.

 

There is a product available in building supply stores that is very similar to Renshape etc.   It is also a composite, man-made board/plank designed for outdoor decks and boat docks.   Totally impervious to weather.   The great thing about these products is that the manufacturers of almost all of them will send you a free sample of all their products ... just ask for it and you'll have enough to make loads of tires.   

 

Google " Free sample composite decking".

 

There is nothing tricky about shaping a tire other than getting the dimensions correct and making sure your rim is a snug fit into the middle.  If you look back at my dimension diagram there is a slightly wider outer ring (defined by "A" and "G") which is what your tire should fit snugly against.

 

49273915571_7c76d69025_c.jpg

 

TIRE TREADS:

 

Recently I purchased a cheap "knurling tool" for my lathe which is designed to emboss a pattern into a tool handle for better grip.  It has been very effective for impressing a diamond pattern onto the tread area.  My device came with several pairs of serrated wheel patterns which, between them, can produce a variety of "treads".

 

49273451973_519b148ae4_c.jpg

 

And Finally ...

I wanted to be able to emboss those little radial lines around the outer sidewall of a tire ... As in the following picture.

 

49274125457_c69a074344_c.jpg

 

To do this I removed an adjustment wheel from my knurling device which has parallel grooves on its' perimeter.  

This one ...

 

49278174568_237b2b8d9d_o.jpg

 

I jury rigged it on a bolt, locked it into the tool holder and ran it along the outer rim of my tire and got the above pattern.

 

49274128157_47ed66bbee_c.jpg

 

OK, that's about it.   There's a lot of steps and some are finicky but once you've tried it (if you bother to) you might like the results.   

Feel free to modify my design and suggest improvements.

 

Frank

 

As seen on ...

 

36543390965_623b3704fc_c.jpg

 

 

49278192008_741b85c73c_c.jpg

 

 

49278206058_90c685d952_c.jpg

 

and others!!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Edited by albergman
Typo

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Very effective! I'm getting tempted to buy a lathe now. Ive been using plastic tubing for the rims, the ends of guitar strings for hubs and fishing line for the spokes, but the results aren't nearly as good as yours. And trying to hand carve four identical wooden tyres is a recipe for madness!

 

by the way, that testa rossa is a gem.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, Redshift said:

Very effective! I'm getting tempted to buy a lathe now. Ive been using plastic tubing for the rims, the ends of guitar strings for hubs and fishing line for the spokes, but the results aren't nearly as good as yours. And trying to hand carve four identical wooden tyres is a recipe for madness!

 

by the way, that testa rossa is a gem.

Thanks RS.    Glad you liked my Testa Rossa.   I really enjoy bringing a favourite shape from a block of wood and have done quite a few over the years,

 

 I invested in a hobby lathe a couple of years ago with the only intention being to make a set of wires for my very old GTO.   I've been pleasantly surprised to find how much I use it and it's great fun.    I hadn't used one since high school days back in the 50's but it's a simple tool and one can quickly learn how to use it.   Let me know if I can be of any help if/when you want to try some wheels.   I think there's a limit to how small my technique can be taken ... i.e. maybe 1/18th scale.    Bigger is even better.

 

Frank

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...