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cngaero

PayPal Scam

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I received a text message from a mobile number about an hour ago supposedly from PayPal informing me that my account was blocked and giving me a link to open in order to verify my identity. I rang PayPal themselves only to be told that my account was fine, secure and still open with no restrictions whatsoever. They advised me not to hit the link and to delete it. 

So watch out, there's some little tinkers about. 

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I had a similar text yesterday, its the second or third, I just delete them, BUT, I wonder where or how they got my name from, I imagine its just a guess that they put paypal in, if they send thousands of these emails go out, chances are, like you and me, we both use paypal,  but I am sure many they send to are not on Paypal………….just gets me wondering what the criteria is for targeting me, I only use Paypal about twice per month.

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In a similar vein....  anyone else getting plagued with automated calls allegedly from Amazon ?  Distinct whiff of scam to it....

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21 minutes ago, Vince1159 said:

I get them now and again by e-mail,your account's been frozen please click on link blah blah....

I've had those, too.  I just ignore them.

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57 minutes ago, rayprit said:

I had a similar text yesterday, its the second or third, I just delete them, BUT, I wonder where or how they got my name from, I imagine its just a guess that they put paypal in, if they send thousands of these emails go out, chances are, like you and me, we both use paypal,  but I am sure many they send to are not on Paypal………….just gets me wondering what the criteria is for targeting me, I only use Paypal about twice per month.

That's the bit that bugged me, my name wasn't included in the text, but they got my mobile number from somewhere. 

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4 hours ago, cngaero said:

That's the bit that bugged me, my name wasn't included in the text, but they got my mobile number from somewhere. 

That happens in one of two ways.

 

FIrstly, by auto dial, starting at say 0100 0000001 up to say 0999 9999999, and hope someone answers, or

 

Secondly by buying blocks of telephone numbers.

 

You'd be surprised how many businesses sell and buy blocks of phone numbers, and how cheap they can be.

 

My guess is autodiallers, though.

Edited by Whofan

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Text messages are no different than email messages. Send them out blindly* and some are bound to hit people with paypal, amazon, or other targeted accounts. The people without such accounts immediately dismiss the obvious scam attempt. You should do the same even if you have such an account. If you really do wonder if the message is real, do what Chris (the OP) did and contact the org directly via phone or email--that is, WITHOUT using any info from the bogus SMS or email.

 

It is FAR FAR BETTER to distrust each and every communication claiming to be from paypal, amazon, &etc. If there truly is a problem, go to your account using the means you normally do, and then look to see if there's a message for you. 

 

* SMS gateways enable text messages to be sent via email, so the miscreant scammer isn't even paying per message costs--you are, though.

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30 minutes ago, dnl42 said:

It is FAR FAR BETTER to distrust each and every communication

Call me cynical but i don't trust most of the people i meet face to face....

Edited by Vince1159

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2 hours ago, IanHx said:

In a similar vein....  anyone else getting plagued with automated calls allegedly from Amazon ?  Distinct whiff of scam to it....

yep, purporting from Amazon Prime

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2 hours ago, IanHx said:

In a similar vein....  anyone else getting plagued with automated calls allegedly from Amazon ?  Distinct whiff of scam to it....

All the time from them, Visa and Paypal, closing your account, having £600 taken from your visa account and money begin taken from our Amazon account. Both phone calls and emails. The phone slammed down and all the emails deleted and poeple who are live on the phone are asked if they should get a real job instead of trying to scam people. Don't give them half a chance.      ,

Edited by ocatlub

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Include supposed calls from the taxman HMRC saying you have a refund due from last year on the list of scam calls. 
 

the one asking you to press 1 to call back is a divert to an expensive premium line service they make money from on your phone account. Don’t call using that “service”

 

every time engage brain first before doing anything and ask would I be contacted this way? Does the enquiry make sense?  And had I better not just contact this company/ HMRC or whoever directly to check if this is genuine?  

 

1 hour ago, Vince1159 said:

Call me cynical but i don't trust most of the people i meet face to face....

Nor that guy I see every morning when I shave. Dodgy looking and not to be trusted. 

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I keep these AH’s on the phone as long as I can and just play dumb with them. I keep asking them to repeat the question and then when we get to the second question I’ll ask them to repeat the first one again! It’s lots of fun, just keep calm and you end up in control of the conversation in no time. When you’ve had enough, just hang up!! 
 

Cheers and trust no one.. Dave 

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With the internet scams where the scammer pretends to be Paypal, Amazon, Netflix etc. etc. a dead giveaway , and a very simple one to look for is that the genuine emails will address you by name in the body of the email where the scammers will address you as 'Dear Customer' 'Dear account holder' or Dear 'email address user name'. Anyone can get your email address but getting your name is a bit more difficult and takes time.

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They're all fairly obvious scams, and none of them should be trusted. I have been told in the past by various providers like Paypal that if there is a problem with your account you will receive an email, or maybe a text message, asking you to log in to the account and all will be revealed. The message will NOT include a clickable link - if it does it's almost certainly a scam. In fact, as I was told, the clickable link is usually a dead giveaway that the message is not kosher, and you should do nothing other than delete it. 

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This is also where being what some disparagingly refer to as a "grammar Nazi" pays off: quite often these scam emails are full of basic grammar and/or spelling errors, or have odd phrasing, almost as if English was not the first language of the sender.  And it may well not be.

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The names are randomly selected by computer; its why we tend to get lots of these "have you had an accident lately calls are coming from, no such thing as ex directory now, lol, there's no directory. its just a computer generated list. I tend to KNOW what's happening in my Paypal account and when i get spoof mail like this i dont even open it but send it straight to trash; i used to see the posts a bit and without opening them i checked my Paypal account and all was well. I do see more clever ways for these kinds of people and i will forward these on to Paypal.

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43 minutes ago, Beardie said:

With the internet scams where the scammer pretends to be Paypal, Amazon, Netflix etc. etc. a dead giveaway , and a very simple one to look for is that the genuine emails will address you by name in the body of the email where the scammers will address you as 'Dear Customer' 'Dear account holder' or Dear 'email address user name'. Anyone can get your email address but getting your name is a bit more difficult and takes time.

No way to check in my case as they are txt messages to my mobile, I do a trace on google relating to the number, sometimes I find out its a common spam number and other ppl have received txt, but on other searches, nothing is found or, number does not exist as its something not like a phone number - begins with a "2" but still a txt msg

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Not all scam artists are on the internet, step forward Currys (London Rd, Coventry branch) and a particularly odious salesman who despite repeatedly being told no to an extended warranty support contract still managed to raise the paperwork for such and it was only after I steadfastly refused to sign a direct debit and was about to go ballistic on him that he went to customer services and cancelled what he shouldn't have tried to do in the first place. Sheesh. Not shopping there again.

Edited by IanHx

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10 minutes ago, Markh-75 said:

The names are randomly selected by computer; its why we tend to get lots of these "have you had an accident lately calls are coming from, no such thing as ex directory now, lol, there's no directory. its just a computer generated list. I tend to KNOW what's happening in my Paypal account and when i get spoof mail like this i dont even open it but send it straight to trash; i used to see the posts a bit and without opening them i checked my Paypal account and all was well. I do see more clever ways for these kinds of people and i will forward these on to Paypal.

I used to forward these messages to spoof @ Paypal to their Fraud department, but, I suspect its undermanned or investigated ad-hoc if and when they show an interest...……..I find it pointless sending them now as nothing happens and still these scams keep appearing in my "inbox"

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8 minutes ago, rayprit said:

I find it pointless sending them now as nothing happens and still these scams keep appearing in my "inbox"


paypal won’t be able to stop them coming to you because they aren’t from them in the first place!  
Any scammer can send you a bogus email claiming whatever from any address. When/if that address gets blocked they will just hassle you from another account of theirs. 
 

They are so easy to spot as mentioned. Always the same formula used by them too - its never your actual name, always a link to click and always a threat of losing something if you don’t take immediate action etc. Plus not to mention spelling or grammar errors as well. The originator address is always non official too. 

Laughable really now, surely everyone has cottoned on to these type of emails?  I guess some gullible or mis-informed person will panic and click the link then lose their life savings or something. 
 

 

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2 minutes ago, Tony Oliver said:

Laughable really now, surely everyone has cottoned on to these type of emails?  I guess some gullible or mis-informed person will panic and click the link then lose their life savings or something. 

I fully agree with your response, as for gullible, there will always be gullible ppl, there are always "new" ppl joining the net from all ages completely unaware of such things as spam and scam.  Until they become experienced with the net and its ways ppl will not be sure what button to press and some who receive threatening letters relating to court action willingly sending cash to be rid of the non existent debt...…...once again I agree whole heartedly with all you say

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As for scams, stay away from a website called wainershop.com. It’s a scam and all the images are direct copies from eBay. It’s actually quite a clever site and offers free worldwide postage for orders for a relatively small amount. You will find most modelling products at incredibly cheap prices and as we all love a good bargain it’s quite tempting to test it. Take it from me - DON’T!! I eventually got my money back however it took quite a bit of convincing to my banks fraud department to prove it was a scam. Basically the girl I ended up speaking with was also duped and I had to tell her that even someone with her working background was easily caught out! 
 

Cheers.. Dave 

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1 hour ago, Rabbit Leader said:

I keep these AH’s on the phone as long as I can and just play dumb with them. I keep asking them to repeat the question and then when we get to the second question I’ll ask them to repeat the first one again! It’s lots of fun, just keep calm and you end up in control of the conversation in no time. When you’ve had enough, just hang up!! 
 

Cheers and trust no one.. Dave 

There's apparently an iphone app that does that for you. I've heard some of the calls, and they're hilarious!

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1 hour ago, IanHx said:

Not all scam artists are on the internet, step forward Currys (London Rd, Coventry branch) and a particularly odious salesman who despite repeatedly being told no to an extended warranty support contract still managed to raise the paperwork for such and it was only after I steadfastly refused to sign a direct debit and was about to go ballistic on him that he went to customer services and cancelled what he shouldn't have tried to do in the first place. Sheesh. Not shopping there again.

Ian if you want to have a bit of fun on the extended warranty sale follow the template of:-

salesperson - you should take out extended warranty for three years in case the washing machine goes wrong. 
customer - Oh my old one was good for five years before it gave any trouble but this one might be problematic in under three?  Turn to wife and say “maybe we should go home and think about it and check the Which Reports online? We don’t want one that will need repairs inside three years

Wife - Yes and we might find another one that won’t go wrong and it could be cheaper too online

Look at salesperson thinking is this sale walking out front door and trying to think how best to recover the customer 

It’s fun seeing them now trying to square the circle they have just drawn themselves

you can finesse their next response which most likely will be “ well nothing is likely to go wrong in three years with this machine” to which you can say well insurance seems pretty unnecessary then followed by if it’s not going to break why only one years warranty?

if you are imaginative it can go on a while

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