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Phantom Landing Flaps etc


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Just getting my Fgr2 ready for painting and I’m displaying it as if landing. Does anyone know what’s meant to be hanging out flaps wise, spoilers, air brakes etc. I’m doing it taking the wire at Port Stanley. Maybe an old pilot has the gen.  Thanks.....

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Full flaps on the trailing edge, but not the ailerons. Leading edge flaps down, outer wing and outer section of the main wing, but not the inboard sections, they were locked up. No airbrakes.

Hope that helps...

 

-Daz

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Have done similar with the 48 Hasegawa FG.1.  If it helps I used spare missile bodies for the extended oleos.

Aswel as what Dazza says, I posed the aux air doors open  a bit and angled the tailplanes nose down (check photos for reference), that was quite tricky to maintain the right dihedral.

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10 hours ago, delticfan said:

...what did you mean by drooped?

Some aircraft droop their ailerons to act as extra flap area when the flaps are deployed, they still can act in opposition to each other to maintain roll control in the dropped position.

The most visually obvious example of this that I can think of is the Buccaneer.

 

This tends to be a feature of high performance carrier based aircraft to increase flap area for take-off & landing configurations while still retaining the same aileron area and function, hence why the Phantom FG.1 had dropped ailerons and not the land based only FGR.2, as Dazza mentioned.

 

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As memory serves (this was a long time ago!) the ailerons on FG1’s drooped to give more lift & reduced speed for carrier landings but FGR2’s (proper Tooms!) didn’t.

As an ex 23 Sqn rigger at Stanley in 1983, we used to see them taking the RHAG pretty much every day. They would stream the drag chute on or just before touch down, to reduce the speed they hit the RHAG. It made a tremendous noise as it ran out!
Also be aware that the back end (metal blast panels & hook) were very darker than usual, as we were using naval fuel (AVTAG) not AVTUR. The  inhibitors & additives in this made this very sooty. If you just brushed against it, your kit was black. 
Hope that helps & I look forward to seeing the finished article. I am gradually trying to bring my skill levels up after a 20 year lay off from modelling.

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Thanks for the gen all very interesting stuff, as a kid I had a b and w photo of the first f4 to land at Stanley, hence the inspiration, I now have to work out how to make a drag chute! I love the sparks off the hook when it drag on the metal runway.

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From what I understand, The initial F-4B's in the US Navy had the inner leading edge flaps deflecting.  Those were later deactivated and the loss of lift compensated by drooping ailerons instead (also on the F-4J and FG.1).  One of the side effects of the drooping ailerons is that it created a pitch down effect. Therefore the tailplane needs more deflection in order to compensate.  That would be the reason the FG.1 and F-4J tailplanes have a slot on the leading edge as the unslotted 'standard' tailplane would be too close to stalling at low speed / high AOA...

 

Maybe someone with more knowledge on the Phantom can either confirm or deny this?

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We have a photo in our museum archive that shows a visiting F-110A/F-4B in USAF markings, with the inboard leading edge flap deflecting. It is however taking off, rather than landing, so I don't know if there were different settings.

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1 hour ago, bentwaters81tfw said:

a visiting F-110A/F-4B in USAF markings

The USAF F-4C/D and RF-4C kept the movable inboard leading edge flaps throughout their carreer... 

 

Apologies for not sticking to FGR.2's, but I just love Phantoms a little bit too much haha

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15 hours ago, guillaume320 said:

From what I understand, The initial F-4B's in the US Navy had the inner leading edge flaps deflecting.

 

Here's Phantom #1000, an F-4B, that has the inboard l/e flaps down...

 

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