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Weatherman

Kenttavihrea or Finnish Olive Green

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Hello to all chaps,

 

Opening this thread in order to discuss around the so called "Kenttavihrea" colour used by the Finnish Air Force during WWII (but as well until last years).  Searching through the internet in various sites, including color photographs of that era, modelling instructions and of course published stuff, someone can find quite large variety of that Finnish green used on almost all aircraft. The matter is, what is the closest hue of that green to be used on a model. The most common FS reference for this colour is the 34096, refered as the ideal one in Special Hobby's colour instructions for Finnish subjects of WWII:

 

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This colour seems quite dull and mostly gray, looking at it on its own. Let us now see what the colour was like on the real airplane (photos are from the Finnish Military Archive). Firstly, we have a great shot of a Brewster Buffalo with a speciality between fuselage and rudder green and a (quite backlit) photograph of a Fokker:

 

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What derives from the colour analysis of the above photos, picking up the green colour in photoshop we have the below hues:

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Fokker wing was very difficult to pick up, because the was not a clear point to chose the colour from.

 

First impressions:

 

1) Looks like that Finns (as most of the air forces of the world) used slightly virabale hues of the same colour on their aircraft, or this is a result of newly painted parts and older ones that came through weathering, fading etc.

2) Can we accept FS34096 as the right colour code for Kenttavihrea? If yes, then it seems to be most closer to the Buffalo fuselage, which indeed seems a bit grayish.

3) From diferrent colour photographs of several kinds of airplanes of the Finnish Air Force, the human eye translates the information for a more vivid and saturated green, rather than the above gray-green colour. Closer to the rudder one. This maybe happens due to the contrast with the black colours that lays just next to the green and occasionally with the yellow coloured parts.

 

Now let us see what modelling colour companies suggest for FS34096:

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Colour charts suggest Humbrol 108, but it seems that this is out of production. AK suggests Humbrol 30 as relative, which is nothing else that the common dark green.

 

As a result from the above comparison through hues and colours, it seems that AK is greatly close to the original green-gray of the buffalo fuselage, but to me - and considering the scale effect - you will end up having a rather gray than green hue. I think MMP is into the point for that so called "olive green" and I would not hesitate to use Lifecolour RLM 82 (was there any connection between German codes and Finnish ones since they were typically allies?), but maybe a little duller with some drops of gray. Vallejo (if this is the real hue) seems to be way too dark).

 

And for the end, a just-eye-comparison among the colour shades:
 

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I think MMP gets to the point!

 

Thank you for your time. Looking forward to read your answers.

 

Themis

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37 minutes ago, Weatherman said:

The most common FS reference for this colour is the 34096

I'll stick some @Kari Lumppio  and @Antti_K  as they are a couple of our Finnish members, but we have others who maybe ablle to add more.

 

Regarding FS 34096,  and FS 595, it's a set of approved paints for the US government, not a colour atlas.   

 

It is commonly used in modelling circles as it's fairly widely available,  but what the quoted FS number usually means is "closest visual match" which then become "matched too"  far too often in the modelling world

 

FWIW, FS 34096 is also oft quoted as match for FAA Dark Slate Grey

despite the name, it's the green colour seen on this Seafire

 

16636868203_1a71c96c33_b.jpgSeafires , 1942. by Etienne du Plessis, on Flickr

 

 

Have you contacted the Finnish Air force museum?  They have always been very helpful when I have contacted them,  and they should know. 

 

48 minutes ago, Weatherman said:

was there any connection between German codes and Finnish ones since they were typically allies?

I assume you mean colours, not codes?  Not typically allies,  more my enemies enemy is my friend, The Finns had been attacked by the USSR in 1939, and lost a chunk of Finland to them, Eastern Karelia.    

 

Anyway, regarding colours, no connection, except for the underside blue, which the Finns called Dornier blue, which was on Do-17's, and the became adopted by the Finns, and is basically RLM 65

 

The paints used were Finnish in origin, I think there is information on this in the Finnish Fighter Colours books, which right now I can't be bothered to go and dig out, but will do later and refresh my memory.

 

HTH

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Hello all,

 

Weatherman, I think that unfortunately you have wasted your time with that colour analysis. Old colour photos (although good quality ones) that have been scanned and then printed on a book or a magazine are not reliable sources for colour research. I've seen and studied several aircraft in that paint scheme and the FS numbers usually given just aren't accurate. Last summer I made colour comparisons on the green and I can give you the NCS (Natural Colour System) code for the dark green colour. HUmbrol 108 is pretty good paint for many subjects but it is too brownish for Finnish WWII green.

 

If you wish to model (and I hope you do!) a Finnish WWII aircraft, I suggest that you purchase Lifecolor's set "Finnish aircraft WWII colours". The green is extremely accurate.

 

Kind Regards,

Antti

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I would agree that the US F.S.595 standard is pointless in this case.  It didn't even exist in WWII, and the Finns surely didn't use it even then.

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What the others have said.

 

Antii: can you confirm that the Finns used the same shade of green throughout the war?  And if it isn't drifting too far from the subject, what underside colour did they use before the Dornier blue?

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Thank you all for your answers. it seems things are more simple here. I also have Finnish Fighter Colours of WWII by Mushroom. but have not made a good research on it yet. I will do though. Antii, you suggest Lifecolour variety and as I can see the olive green for Finnish camouflage is #540. Yes I am intending to build two models of Suomen Ilmavoimien, a Morane and a Fokker D.21, and I have also built a Hasegawa Buffalo in 1/72 which is this:

 

spacer.png spacer.png

 

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I used humbrol colours and to be honest I have no idea which green I used. Maybe there is written down somewhere in the instructions of the model. I think it seems to vivid, right? If I was to use again humbrol code or AK real color, which one would you suggest? Thank you.

 

Themis

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3 hours ago, Graham Boak said:

What the others have said.

 

Antii: can you confirm that the Finns used the same shade of green throughout the war?  And if it isn't drifting too far from the subject, what underside colour did they use before the Dornier blue?

Hi all,

 

In a recent Finnish modelling magazine was a long article about the "DN-colour". Author claims three different colours used as it: RLM65 variant 1938, RLM65 variant 1941 and a domestic colour, all different. Although I don't understand why older version of RLM65 would be delivered during 1942 this leaves still two hues: German and Finnish ones. 

 

It looks like the same is true with the green. I have seen several aircraft in their original Finnish WW2 Green colour: At least Hurricane, Brewster (although I'm not so sure how reliable it is after 46 years under water), Ripon, Kotka and Aero A.32. Hurricane iand IIRC Ripon are more brownish than the Aero. And none of these is not as grey as dark slate grey.

 

I won't say FS as worthless but I see it as a starting point especially if there is verbal comments about the accuracy. FS 34096 is a good example of the risks when using it. Earlier FInnish green was said as FS 34087.

 

LIfecolor green might be good but at least their original "DN-colour" was far off. I recall Humbrol 86 and 117 said as good matches as well as RAF Dark Green Xtracolor X1.

 

Cheers,

 

AaCee

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Is there now hard evidence for two different colours of RLM 65?  I've seen it talked about for a few years but is it backed up by any evidence in published form - or indeed elsewhere than just "so-and-so on the internet?

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Hello all,

 

that is a lovely looking Buffalo Themis! To my eye the green looks a bit too bright. Hope to see your Morane and Fokker in the near future🙂

 

The Dark Green (tumman vihreä) is NCS S7010-G70Y. If you have the book "British Aviation Colours of World War Two" with a colour chart then look at the chip "Dark Slate Grey" as it is almost a perfect match for the Finnish Dark Green. I would say that there is no match in Humbrol range but recent tins of Hu 163 (RAF Dark Green) are a very good starting point. As a matter of fact I bought few (tins) last summer and was surprised to see that the paint inside was a match for Hu 108! Current Hu 86 is not a particular good match for the Finnish green and Hu 117 is far too bright. As said earlier the Lifecolor set gives a perfect match for Finnish Dark Green. To put it more precisely; my observation about the dark green were made on metal surfaces only. AaCee mentions also aircraft like Jupiter Aero and Ripon with fabric surfaces. It is possible that a completely different paint was used for fabric and metal.

 

I talked to the museum staff during the Buffalo restoration and the guys there said that all the colours changed noticeably week after week as the aircraft dried.

 

As AaCee said the light blue colour in the Lifecolor set raised a storm here in Finland. Many modellers refused to take it as accurate. The guy who did most of the research stated the very hue was uncovered from the Hurricane. And that an "unlabeled bottle of German light blue" paint was recovered from a former ground crew member at Kauhava AB. Maybe the point is that the researchers made some chemical analysis on the pigments and they matched those wartime German paint descriptions. To my eye the Lifecolor light blue looks too dark and too bright. But then again I've only seen samples that have been exposed to all elements for over 70 years...

 

I do not have the guts (nor the expertise) to confirm that there were two official variants of RLM 65. Michael Ullmann gives two very different paint chips of RLM 65 (1938 and 1941) in his book "Luftwaffe Colours 1935 - 1945". One possible explanation could be in the LDv 521 itself as it was published in 1938 and again in 1941. Possibly the quality of the paint chips wasn't especially good and that allowed a discussion about two different light blues to start. Thomas Hitchcock's Monogram Painting Guide gives only one sample of RLM 65 and that falls between the two samples in Ullmann's book. The light blue in Lifecolor set is darker and more bluish than the chip in Hitchcock's painting guide but it seems possible that fresh RLM 65 could have looked just that.


Graham: Unfortunately I can't "officially" confirm that only one Dark Green colour was used throughout the war. At least there were two or three independent paint suppliers. And over the war years the quality of the raw materials got worse and there was a shortage of just about everything. That must have affected the manufacturing of paints. But the name for the colour (and therefore the specification) remained the same. Before "DN -väri" (DN -Colour, RLM 65) was introduced a light grey was used. Lifecolor set gives a grey that is a good match for L40/52 Hellgrau (see Ullmann's colour chart). It is also an excellent match for RLM 41 (See Hitchcock's painting guide, p. 13).

 

Cheers,

Antti

 

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Regarding undersurface colors on the Brewsters (prior to the introduction of DN-color) there has been considerable debate.  They were delivered in overall aluminum lacquer paint; the green and black uppersurface camouflage was added with little surface prep in June 1941, explaining the tattered paintwork that quickly followed.  The undersurfaces remained in the original Brewster aluminum lacquer.  At some point, repainting of the undersurface was done with either fresh aluminum lacquer or light grey - sources disagree whether the light grey was used for metal surfaces.  In any event, there was some repainting of at least some planes prior to the use of DN color, since the underwing serials disappeared prior to DN's introduction.

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Hi Antti, Jim and all,

On 11/20/2019 at 10:54 PM, Antti_K said:

The Dark Green (tumman vihreä) is NCS S7010-G70Y. If you have the book "British Aviation Colours of World War Two" with a colour chart then look at the chip "Dark Slate Grey" as it is almost a perfect match for the Finnish Dark Green. I would say that there is no match in Humbrol range but recent tins of Hu 163 (RAF Dark Green) are a very good starting point. As a matter of fact I bought few (tins) last summer and was surprised to see that the paint inside was a match for Hu 108!

When compared with this book yes. Several models I have seen with unkown Dark Slate Grey(s)  have looked too grey for me. Your sample is checked from the Hurricane?

 

On 11/20/2019 at 10:54 PM, Antti_K said:

Current Hu 86 is not a particular good match for the Finnish green and Hu 117 is far too bright. As said earlier the Lifecolor set gives a perfect match for Finnish Dark Green. To put it more precisely; my observation about the dark green were made on metal surfaces only. AaCee mentions also aircraft like Jupiter Aero and Ripon with fabric surfaces. It is possible that a completely different paint was used for fabric and metal.

H86 and H117 were mentioned when they were new additions to Humbrol range. If they have chenged I don't know as after Humbrol's quality dropped I have no longer obtained them.

 

I suggest you to read the recent DN-colour article. Although subject is not the dark green it shows part of the latest research of FInnish AF wartime colours and some parts applies to the other colours too. Unfortunately it is available only in Finnish.

 

On 11/20/2019 at 10:54 PM, Antti_K said:

As AaCee said the light blue colour in the Lifecolor set raised a storm here in Finland. Many modellers refused to take it as accurate. The guy who did most of the research stated the very hue was uncovered from the Hurricane. And that an "unlabeled bottle of German light blue" paint was recovered from a former ground crew member at Kauhava AB. Maybe the point is that the researchers made some chemical analysis on the pigments and they matched those wartime German paint descriptions. To my eye the Lifecolor light blue looks too dark and too bright. But then again I've only seen samples that have been exposed to all elements for over 70 years..

I have heard the gentleman's behind these shafdes explanation what happened: Analyze of the chemistry was done without porperly mixing the colours and so the painted sample was too dark. IIRC adding 1/3 of white would correct it. What I remember the story of the colours origin is different, but it is not relevant here.

 

On 11/20/2019 at 10:54 PM, Antti_K said:

HI do not have the guts (nor the expertise) to confirm that there were two official variants of RLM 65. Michael Ullmann gives two very different paint chips of RLM 65 (1938 and 1941) in his book "Luftwaffe Colours 1935 - 1945". One possible explanation could be in the LDv 521 itself as it was published in 1938 and again in 1941. Possibly the quality of the paint chips wasn't especially good and that allowed a discussion about two different light blues to start. Thomas Hitchcock's Monogram Painting Guide gives only one sample of RLM 65 and that falls between the two samples in Ullmann's book. The light blue in Lifecolor set is darker and more bluish than the chip in Hitchcock's painting guide but it seems possible that fresh RLM 65 could have looked just that.

Hitchcock's book was an ultimate Luftwaffe colour reference when it was published. Unfortuntaley it shows what was the knowledge 40 years ago. Later Ullmann's work which has been already once uptated, Ken Merrick's two part Luftwaffe Colours tome and latest AK Interactive's books have superceded it. All these agree with two different variations of the RLM 65. Older deeper blue and later paler and greyer one.

On 11/21/2019 at 6:18 AM, jimmaas said:

Regarding undersurface colors on the Brewsters (prior to the introduction of DN-color) there has been considerable debate.  They were delivered in overall aluminum lacquer paint; the green and black uppersurface camouflage was added with little surface prep in June 1941, explaining the tattered paintwork that quickly followed.  The undersurfaces remained in the original Brewster aluminum lacquer.  At some point, repainting of the undersurface was done with either fresh aluminum lacquer or light grey - sources disagree whether the light grey was used for metal surfaces.  In any event, there was some repainting of at least some planes prior to the use of DN color, since the underwing serials disappeared prior to DN's introduction.

Current understanding is that undersurfaces of metal-built war planes were painted silver dope. In these fabric covered ailerons etc. were also painted with the same colour. Light grey was used with wooden and fabric main structures.

 

Before painting light blue bellies the wing serials might be omitted during repairs or when the whole wing was fitted to another airframe. It was not in Finnish regulations so this was possible.

 

Greetings,

 

AaCee

 

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Hello AaCee and all,

 

thank you for a detailed response.

 

My readings for the dark green come mainly from Tuisku advanced trainer at Vesivehmaa museum. I can't say whether the RAF Museum book has an accurate colour chart or not. Many British modellers and enthusiasts here deem it very accurate. I'm just lucky to have found a copy at rock bottom price😉 If the British book is used as a guide for colour mixing then at least an accurate Finnish dark green can be created.

 

I wouldn't say that Hitchcock's work has somehow "expired" or "out dated" despite the fact that it is more than 40 years old. Hitchcock worked first hand with Observed Colours; not on Specification Colours. When he was examining those war time German aircraft he saw and studied an actual painted surface. I agree that the paint was some 30+ years old even at that point. This of course have some affect on the outcome. Current research (Ullmann & others) concentrates more on specifications. Possibly due to the fact that remaining bits and pieces are now even 80 years old. So I agree that current research has given us far more accurate understanding on Specification Colours and how they should have looked.  But current research can't give us more accurate readings about the fact how those actual painted surfaces looked 40 years ago. I think that the only problem with Hitchcock's work lies in his approach to the subject as he tried to bind every colour sample with a RLM number. Ullmann's research clearly proves such an approach problematic.

 

I am (also) somewhat skeptic over those "original Luftwaffe paint tins" found just last week in a barn nearby in some small Czech village. I saw photos about alleged Luftwaffe tins and they didn't match the descriptions about German paint tins given for example by M. Ullmann. There was at least a plan to publish a "real Luftwaffe colour chart" based on the found paints.

 

Cheers,

Antti

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23 hours ago, Antti_K said:

My readings for the dark green come mainly from Tuisku advanced trainer at Vesivehmaa museum. I can't say whether the RAF Museum book has an accurate colour chart or not. Many British modellers and enthusiasts here deem it very accurate. I'm just lucky to have found a copy at rock bottom price😉 If the British book is used as a guide for colour mixing then at least an accurate Finnish dark green can be created.

Hi Antti,

 

Thank you for your responce.

 

It is interesting that there is a Tuisku at Vesivehmaa as it is not listed in their or Ilmalílumuseoyhdistys listings. Looks like I should visit here some day as it is ages I was there last time. Hopefully it was not the same frame that was some years ago at the Vantaa museum as I understood that one was re-painted.

 

I got my RAF museum colour book from Akateeminen annual book sale some time during 1980's when I was studying at Helsinki. It was a bargain!

 

23 hours ago, Antti_K said:

I wouldn't say that Hitchcock's work has somehow "expired" or "out dated" despite the fact that it is more than 40 years old. Hitchcock worked first hand with Observed Colours; not on Specification Colours. When he was examining those war time German aircraft he saw and studied an actual painted surface. I agree that the paint was some 30+ years old even at that point. This of course have some affect on the outcome. Current research (Ullmann & others) concentrates more on specifications. Possibly due to the fact that remaining bits and pieces are now even 80 years old. So I agree that current research has given us far more accurate understanding on Specification Colours and how they should have looked.  But current research can't give us more accurate readings about the fact how those actual painted surfaces looked 40 years ago. I think that the only problem with Hitchcock's work lies in his approach to the subject as he tried to bind every colour sample with a RLM number. Ullmann's research clearly proves such an approach problematic.

This is a valid point about Hitchcock's work. In fact my favorite source is late Ken Merrick's 2-colume set as he had already published 4-part study and a photo condendum about the Luftwaffe colours  during 1970's. The latter work was based after that with the later digged out information including Farben Kiroff-produced faximile colour charts. And on top of that the latest research of the late war colours (RLM80 onwards) from either Ullman's second edition or AK's book.

 

I see that Monogram book has it's value but combined with later works, not as the only source.

 

Cheers,

 

AaCee

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Hello AaCee and all,

 

well there is actually only the fuselage of Tuisku and it is in original colour. I got a permission to clean the surface before examining the colour. I then made some comparisons with the Ripon but the greens are different. The readings taken from Tuisku are a close match to Hurricane. And I was very disappointed when I realized that the Caudron was ferried to Poland... I even heard a rumor that they are possibly going to re-paint it.

 

About Luftwaffe colours: I recently bought an old book called "Luftwaffe colours and markings" published by Kookaburra Publications in the 1970s (yellow covers and a bf-109 on the cover). My volume is actually an annex to the three original volumes. It contains a facsimile colour chart but only a few colour samples match current research (like Ullmann or Kiroff). I also bought Ullmann's first edition. Actually I have been using Monogram book together with Ullmann's and Kiroff's books as well. And of course also the RAL colour chart. Ullmann gives some interesting ideas about the late war shades and those still available at the RAL K5 collection.

 

Cheers,

Antti

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12 minutes ago, Antti_K said:

And I was very disappointed when I realized that the Caudron was ferried to Poland... I even heard a rumor that they are possibly going to re-paint it.

Do not worry, in recent issue of Polish journal for aviation fans there is an article on restoration of Caudron 714 and and the original paint is restored by art restoration professionalists, I hope nobody want to paint it over at the end...

Here is a this year photo with reconstructed parts (taken from here: http://www.muzeumlotnictwa.pl/muzeum/caudron-odzyskuje-dawny-blask/)

Caudron_00-600x306.jpg

and here:

https://www.altair.com.pl/news/view?news_id=27674

some more photos here

https://forum.odkrywca.pl/topic/742595-caudron-renault-cr-714-cyclone-w-krakowie/page/4/?tab=comments#comment-2019284

(you have to scroll screen down)

 

Regards

J-W

 

P.S. 

I am just about to finish MBR-2 M17,  VV-183....  Soon at RFI, I hope.

 

 

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That sounds promising J-W! The original paint is in bad state at places and it is nice to hear that professionals are taking care of her. Let's indeed hope that nobody gets any "bright" ideas about re-painting. Thank you for the links🙂

 

Waiting for that Beriev...

 

Cheers,

Antti

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Is the AK Interactive book considered as a reliable latest word on Luftwaffe colours?  Certainly I wasn't impressed by the one book I saw, if only on brief acquaintance, and I gather that the British Army colours bear poor relation to the advice they were given and even acknowledge.   On this basis I have doubts about their value as an independent reference.

 

Of course, given the lack of decent recent reference for Soviet and Japanese, at least those reflecting the greater knowledge that is now available, the AK work may well be assumed valuable here.

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19 hours ago, Antti_K said:

well there is actually only the fuselage of Tuisku and it is in original colour. I got a permission to clean the surface before examining the colour. I then made some comparisons with the Ripon but the greens are different. The readings taken from Tuisku are a close match to Hurricane. And I was very disappointed when I realized that the Caudron was ferried to Poland... I even heard a rumor that they are possibly going to re-paint it.

Hi Antti, J-W, Graham and all,

 

Good to know that the Tuuisku is in original colours. I really have to visit there when the weather gets better next spring.

 

I have understood that Polish has been wishing to get the Caudron changed into markings of Polish pilots but it is not allowed in the agreement related to the loan.

18 hours ago, JWM said:

Do not worry, in recent issue of Polish journal for aviation fans there is an article on restoration of Caudron 714 and and the original paint is restored by art restoration professionalists, I hope nobody want to paint it over at the end...

Here is a this year photo with reconstructed parts (taken from here: http://www.muzeumlotnictwa.pl/muzeum/caudron-odzyskuje-dawny-blask/)

Caudron_00-600x306.jpg

and here:

https://www.altair.com.pl/news/view?news_i

d=27674

some more photos here

https://forum.odkrywca.pl/topic/742595-caudron-renault-cr-714-cyclone-w-krakowie/page/4/?tab=comments#comment-2019284

(you have to scroll screen down)

Thank you for the links, J-W! Good to see that the Caudron is in respective hands!

 

17 hours ago, Graham Boak said:

Is the AK Interactive book considered as a reliable latest word on Luftwaffe colours?  Certainly I wasn't impressed by the one book I saw, if only on brief acquaintance, and I gather that the British Army colours bear poor relation to the advice they were given and even acknowledge.   On this basis I have doubts about their value as an independent reference.

 

Of course, given the lack of decent recent reference for Soviet and Japanese, at least those reflecting the greater knowledge that is now available, the AK work may well be assumed valuable here.

I checked the AK's book's Luftwaffe part and it looks to be in line with Merrick and Ullman research. For example RLM76 was shown with official, relic based and late war versons. Of course one fourth of a book can't go very deep in such a vast subject and the colour samples are printed which is a minus. I woul say it is a useful starting point for studying the Luftwaffe colours. Better colour samples would help a lot.

 

What are the problems with the British section?

 

Soviet part is likely the best printed source of the subject so far. I can't comment British and US ones.

 

Cheers,

 

AaCee

 

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On 11/20/2019 at 11:24 AM, NorthBayKid said:

I would agree that the US F.S.595 standard is pointless in this case.  It didn't even exist in WWII, and the Finns surely didn't use it even then.

M8, everybody agrees with that. We use FS595 because modelling paints matched to it are generally available and if a colour in it by chance is suitable it is a solution to your problem. And a fairly easy one. Regards.

Fernando

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Hi, everyone,

 

I have always read what Troy said: "WIW, FS 34096 is also oft quoted as match for FAA Dark Slate Grey despite the name, it's the green colour seen on this Seafire". However, that very ´picture of a Buffalo rudder put me off (going to FS for "visual matching", I would say it is closer to 34102) However, the now clearer picture fo the fuselage of the same very machine shows a colour much closer to the originally proposed. Any explanation to this difference? Regards!

Fernando

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3 hours ago, Fernando said:

Any explanation to this difference? Regards!

replacement rudder?

bufa.jpg

note the difference in camo pattern, does not look like a match,  note how rear of fuselage in black, and rudder is green,  and the balck on the fin you would expect to sweep back over the rudder. 

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It appears to me, and I'm most likely wrong, but if you look at the base of the rudder and compare the trailing edge to the curved part of the tail cone where it is cut out to meet the rudder, that the rudder is deflected, putting it in direct sunlight- this might account for the difference in appeareance. 

Mike

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On 12/4/2019 at 8:28 PM, Troy Smith said:

replacement rudder?

bufa.jpg

note the difference in camo pattern, does not look like a match,  note how rear of fuselage in black, and rudder is green,  and the balck on the fin you would expect to sweep back over the rudder. 

Hi Troy and all,

 

Good question! In fact the rudder of the BW-393 was earlier blue with white "7"" and when the aircraft changed flight it was re-painted to 3rd flight of Lentolaivue 24 colours.

 

Cheers,

 

AaCee

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On 12/4/2019 at 3:28 PM, Troy Smith said:

replacement rudder?

bufa.jpg

note the difference in camo pattern, does not look like a match,  note how rear of fuselage in black, and rudder is green,  and the balck on the fin you would expect to sweep back over the rudder. 

But Why the replacement rudder would have been painted in another Green colour? Unless covering the earlier unit ID colour would have altered the chroma.

 

Fernando

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1 minute ago, Fernando said:

But Why the replacement rudder would have been painted in another Green colour?

Fresher paint?  Different paint batch?  Just suggestions,  but the fin is pretty chipped, so is reasonably weathered and assume faded.

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