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Mike

Windows 7 Users - end of support from MS

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The Windows 10 upgrade is something I've been putting off, but I guess its time to bite the bullet. I'm am very reluctant to pay Microsoft for the privilege of using their crap software, but unfortunately Linux is not an option (for work reasons) ... and don't get me started on Apple!!

 

I've half heartedly looked into this, but get frustrated in trying to determine whether the free options are genuinely viable, will install with my Windows 7 licence and won't leave me with a mess to sort out.

 

Can someone point me to a free source that they know works reliably?

 

Thanks

 

Colin

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1 minute ago, ckw said:

but unfortunately Linux is not an option (for work reasons)

Why exactly? 

There are very few _real_ reasons when it is not an option. If you occasionally need Windows software then your options are

- WINE

- Virtualization (i.e. run Windows inside Linux)

- Dual Boot

 

As I mentioned before, I installed Linux as my main OS on my Dell XPS-15 but I still have small dual-boot Windows partition for BIOS upgrades, video editing and occasional gaming. Last time I booted into Windows some two months ago

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1 hour ago, ckw said:

The Windows 10 upgrade is something I've been putting off, but I guess its time to bite the bullet. I'm am very reluctant to pay Microsoft for the privilege of using their crap software,

If you've got XP, W7 or W8 you don't have to pay.  You should be able to download a copy of W10 and save it to a flash drive or DVD, then run the install type in your existing license and off you go.  You're paying them by allowing them to harvest your data, which is where Anti Beacon comes in.

1 hour ago, ckw said:

I've half heartedly looked into this, but get frustrated in trying to determine whether the free options are genuinely viable, will install with my Windows 7 licence and won't leave me with a mess to sort out.

 

Can someone point me to a free source that they know works reliably?

I'm not sure what you're driving at here.  If you mean to ask whether your hardware is compatible, have a look here.  If you mean something else however, you'll have to explain a bit more :) In general, my fresh install of W10 on my two PCs (I had spare drives) was pretty easy, with only an additional USB3 card not compatible with Windows 10.  My gaming PC is current gen, while my workshop PC is 4th gen i5 with hardware that's of a similar age.  We also have an ancient laptop that we upgraded to W10 when it first came out, and that's been no issue really.  I changed it over to Linux for a while after some malware concerns, but Caz hated it, so I switched back with a fresh install.  Again, I used spare drives and Macrium Reflect to copy the data on occasion.  Another good piece of software.

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3 hours ago, Mike said:

If you've got XP, W7 or W8 you don't have to pay.  You should be able to download a copy of W10 and save it to a flash drive or DVD, then run the install type in your existing license.

If you get windows 10 from the Microsoft download centre and choose upgrade you don't even have to type in the licence, it works all that out for you.

 

Make sure you have plenty of battery or it is plugged I  because it takes plenty of time.  All pretty much automatic though.

 

Cheers,

 

Nigel

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1 hour ago, nheather said:

If you get windows 10 from the Microsoft download centre and choose upgrade you don't even have to type in the licence, it works all that out for you.

 

Make sure you have plenty of battery or it is plugged I  because it takes plenty of time.  All pretty much automatic though.

Yeah, forgot about the upgrade process.  I was moving my OSes to different drives, and they hadn't been cleaned out in a long while, so I did 2 lots of clean installs with all the faffing that usually involves to get all the software back on board.  There's doubtless still a few things I haven't realised I need to reinstall, but I'm 99% there now :)

 

It's a power hungry process fo shizzle.  Less so if you're doing it with a memory key, but still quite intensive.  A USB3 memory key (one of the fast Samsung ones) certainly does make for a fast install though, especially if you're using an NVMe drive for your OS :Tasty:

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We had no option on the desktop but to migrate to Win10 when it was first introduced - initially we got 'warnings' that it was coming, and then one day it downloaded and installed itself. It took an entire day to do so, and left us unable to use the PC during the process. There was an option to 'revert' back to Win7, which we did - taking nearly another full day - but then some time later it did the 'auto-upgrade' thing again, and that time there was no 'go back' button...

....the laptops came with Win10 when we replaced the old Win7 ones - amongst the first things I did on all three units was 'switch off' Cortana, as 'she' is a memory-hungry madam. One of the consequences of doing that was that 90+% of subsequent updates 'failed' - occasional ones would install, but the majority didn't, even if manually downoaded and run as stand-alone packages. It took some time before I discovered it was because I'd de-activated Cortana - sure enough, when I re-instated her, updates would install. A couple of major updates did auto-install themselves though, and re-activated Cortana in the process - but after the most recent one, she remained 'off' and so far without affecting minor updates...

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On 26/10/2019 at 15:32, andyf117 said:

initially we got 'warnings' that it was coming, and then one day it downloaded and installed itself. It took an entire day to do so, and left us unable to use the PC during the process. There was an option to 'revert' back to Win7, which we did - taking nearly another full day

It did that to my gaming PC when it first launched.  I was watching a movie on the PC late one evening, and it just shut down Kodi and installed Windows 10.  Took about an hour, and when it had finished the graphics drivers couldn't handle my Nvidia GPU (a known issue at the time), so I was stuck at 1024 x 800 or whatever on a 1920 x 1080 screen that was chugging due to the crappy generic VGA driver. :angry: I did the revert back to W7 thing and lost another hour of my life.  By the time I was finished I was fuming, and that put me off W10 for a long time, but I'm currently typing this on a PC running W10 that has that same GPU (Graphics Processing Unit, not ground power unit) installed, and it's fine :shrug: :mental: I do wonder about the sanity of some of the MS people at times.

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The Windows 10 free "up"grade thing was like a treadmill for almost a year IIRC, as Microsoft kept attempting to subvert my efforts to decline their kind offer. I did manage, though, by preventing updates from installing automatically in Windows 7, and then scrutinizing all the proposed updates carefully each time before letting them run - Microsoft had a recurring habit of putting a tick in the "Windows 10 Optional Upgrade" box for you.

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4 minutes ago, Hamiltonian said:

The Windows 10 free "up"grade thing was like a treadmill for almost a year IIRC, as Microsoft kept attempting to subvert my efforts to decline their kind offer. I did manage, though, by preventing updates from installing automatically in Windows 7, and then scrutinizing all the proposed updates carefully each time before letting them run - Microsoft had a recurring habit of putting a tick in the "Windows 10 Optional Upgrade" box for you.

just download this. It runs in the background and blocks W10

https://www.grc.com/never10.htm

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2 hours ago, bentwaters81tfw said:

just download this. It runs in the background and blocks W10

https://www.grc.com/never10.htm

Thanks, but the "free upgrade" thing stopped being an issue back in the middle of 2016.

Towards the end, I half-expected weeping Microsoft executives to start phoning me personally, such was the fever-pitch of excitement my refusal to upgrade seemed to be creating.

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Just to give the other side of the discussion, I actually like Windows 10.  I was very reluctant at first having seen the mess that was Windows 8 and clung onto Windows 7 for a while.

 

But all my home PCs run Windows 10 - I still use Windows 7 on the PCs at work.  Of the two, I prefer Windows 10.  Don’t really see what the objection to it is.

 

Cheers,

 

Nigel

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Hi @Mike thanks for the advice. Thanks to the link to the iso file I have upgraded my netbook and 10 year old pc to Win10. Unfortunately my AGP video card has reverted to Microsoft generic drivers but still able to use it but not all the resolution modes.

 

It somehow seems faster but could be I am thinking that it is.

 

EDIT Regarding the AGP card l was able to use Windows 8 version software from the Nvidia site now l have got back all my screen resolution modes.😃

 

Rregards

Robert

Edited by Robert
Info about video card

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On 11/2/2019 at 5:56 PM, nheather said:

Just to give the other side of the discussion, I actually like Windows 10.  I was very reluctant at first having seen the mess that was Windows 8 and clung onto Windows 7 for a while.

 

But all my home PCs run Windows 10 - I still use Windows 7 on the PCs at work.  Of the two, I prefer Windows 10.  Don’t really see what the objection to it is.

 

Cheers,

 

Nigel

In terms of the free "upgrade" offer, I had several objections. Firstly, upgrading your operating system while you have software installed is a little like trying to install new foundations under your house - it's possible, but not without consequences. Secondly, it was quite obviously a mass beta-test program; if Microsoft had been willing to pay me for my time and trouble, I might have considered it. Thirdly, the more bullying, cajolery and outright deception Microsoft used in an effort to get their software on to my machine, the less inclined I was to cooperate.

 

Windows 10 is certainly better now than it was during that early phase - it's easier to turn off or kill a lot of the stuff you don't want. But they're still doing intrusive things that needs to be circumvented - like making it difficult to set up a new machine without opening a Microsoft account, or occasionally just reverting file associations to point to their own software. Every time I start digging around trying to kill or circumvent some "feature", I seem to hear a Microsoft developer intoning, "Now, now. Don't you worry your pretty little head about that."

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