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Mike

German Gas Station 1930-40 (35598) 1:35

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German Gas Station 1930-40 (35598)

1:35 MiniArt via Creative Models Ltd

 

boxtop.jpg

 

With the proliferation of the internal combustion engine in the early 20th century, petroleum/petrol or gasoline/gas stations began popping up over most of the developed world to meet the demand of the newly mobile populous.  Germany was one such nation, and the now familiar sight of a building with branded petrol pumps and equipment on the forecourt have become the standard indicator of a gas station.

 

The Kit

This set contains the likely accessories and equipment found on the forecourt of a German gas station in the 30-40s, and leaves you to source or create the buildings yourself.  The kit arrives in a shrink-wrapped small top-opening box (think a little larger than a figure box), and inside are ten sprues in grey styrene, two in clear, a small fret of Photo-Etch brass, and a decal sheet.  The package is completed with an instruction booklet, and all the sprues are closely packed in a heat-sealed bag, but the majority of the elastic bands had snapped in transit, so perhaps MiniArt should source some more durable bands for the next batch?

 

sprue1.jpg

 

sprue2.jpg

 

Three sprues hold parts for two fuel barrels, with a hand-pump included and some small cans of varying shapes and sizes that you may have seen in other sets so far, plus a five-shelf storage unit to stash tools and the cans on.  The major parts are used to create two pumps that stand on pillars, with the mechanicals hidden away in a cylindrical housing that can be posed open for business or closed, thanks to the two clamshell doors and PE clapping-plate that fits to the inside lip of one of them.  Two clear halves of the brand sign are added either side of a circular frame and fitted to the top, and as these were often a semi-translucent white with a logo painted or etched on the front and back, there is an opportunity to put in lighting if you're adept with those types of thing.  You'll need to provide a little wire to represent the hose from the body to the nozzle, so make sure you have some to hand.

 

The remaining parts are used to create a stand-alone petrol or diesel compressor with a large receiver tanks underneath that has wheels at one end to allow repositioning wheel-barrow style.  A set of handles and a spray gun are included, the latter needing more wire to act as the air hose of whatever length you choose.

 

 

Markings

The decals are printed by Decograph on a small sheet with good registration, colour density and sharpness, plus a part of the colour instruction sheet is devoted to printed replicas of typical signage, posters and so forth that would be found on the walls of stations at the time.

 

decals.jpg

 

posters.jpg

No, the posters don't really look like that - I blurred them a little to make them unusable.  Fair's fair. :)

 

completedmodel.jpg

 

 

Conclusion

Building a fuel station is a task, but not as difficult as making the hardware to go with it.  This set takes all the hard parts out of the finishing touches, then it's up to you to hunt down a suitable building or build your own using your diorama skills if you have them.

 

Highly recommended.

 

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Review sample courtesy of

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