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TheRealMrEd

PJ Productions 1/72 F-84F Thunderstreak -- Re-issued!!

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Hello again.

 

Well, I am excited today to tell you that the postman just brought something I have wanted for a long time --  a PJ Productions 1/72 resin F-84F Thunderstreak.  While like most, I would have preferred a new injection kit, complete with Jato/Rato and Mk7 nuke options, the PJ Productions kit has long been held to be more accurate (particularly in the nose area!) than the Airfix or Italieri offerings, long overdue for a modern re-tooling!!!   Anyway, I am glad to have it at last.

 

This time the kit comes with European markings, and the box looks like this:

 

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Those on the far side of the pond will be glad to hear that Hannants has them in stock, from whence came my soft-side boxed kit.  Here's what's in the box:

 

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You'll note that some of the tiny parts had come adrift in the bag, including some PE pieces, so for now, I'm holding onto every bit (including some that may only be smuts) until I can sort things.  You will note some rather large sprue parts on the fuse halves, which will need sawing off.  Everything else looks quite good, with very little flash and very sharp molding.  The kit offers three ejection seats, based on mark, and two vertical stabilizers, again based on mark that you are building.  There are good details in all wheel bays.

 

The are also two nicely-formed vacuform canopies, which is good is case one is messed up while building, and also, they eliminate the separate rear quarter windows of other existing kits:

 

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Below, more of the kit's detail is shown; particularly the detail in the cockpit side walls:

 

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Despite the inclusion of the well-printed Euro markings, I will of course, be contrary and use American markings, the old Microscale sheet for the 81st FBW, 78th FBS "Bushmasters".  As a nod to my British hosts and fellow modelers, at least there is the Bentwaters connection!

 

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Anyway, as reviews of this it are scarce, I thought it would be nice to throw one in during the building process.  Little "PJ" here is now due for it's bath in Simple Green detergent  --  stay tuned...

 

Ed

 

 

Edited by TheRealMrEd
corrected title

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Looking forward to seeing how this goes together.  As a fan of early military jets, I agree we really need a new tool injection molded plastic model of this aircraft.  I've never attempted an all-resin kit like this, so I have no idea what's involved in a build like this.

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Nice! Will be following with interest. I built the Italeri one but wasn't happy with with the model (or my excecution for that matter) - but I'm bit hesitant to get a resin kit. 

 

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Posted (edited)

Thanks for raising this subject and making us all aware of the release. I now have one on backorder at the big H :). I will watch your build avidly. One day, when I get to it, mine will be a Greek machine or a Turk :).

 

Martin

Edited by RidgeRunner

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23 minutes ago, RidgeRunner said:

I now have one on backorder at the big H

How did you two pull that off? As soon as I read the Real ME's post, I went to the H website, bu they show it as a future release.  Guessing those of you that had them on backorder are getting theirs before the rest of us unworthies can order. Not cheap, by any means, but if an accurate Hog is desired, it looks like the one to have! (Methinks Meng Models or Platz missed a golden opportunity on this one!)

Mike

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Posted (edited)

Correct Mike,

 

I put it on back order about 3 weeks ago; they shipped it about 10 days ago.  It came in about a week ago, but I was out of town.  Couldn't wait to get this one going  --  fills a big missing hole in the collection!

 

Mdaubin and reini, I will try to explain each step very carefully (if I can remember to do so!), but if I overlook something or you don't understand something, feel free to ask questions.  There are NO dumb questions -- just learning opportunities!

 

Martin, I felt that a lot of the die-hards would love one of these, so as soon as I had safely secured mine (snicker snicker) I thought I'd let the cat out of the bag...

 

Will post first build picks tomorrow or next day --- stay tuned.

 

Ed

Edited by TheRealMrEd

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7 hours ago, 72modeler said:

How did you two pull that off? As soon as I read the Real ME's post, I went to the H website, bu they show it as a future release.  Guessing those of you that had them on backorder are getting theirs before the rest of us unworthies can order. Not cheap, by any means, but if an accurate Hog is desired, it looks like the one to have! (Methinks Meng Models or Platz missed a golden opportunity on this one!)

Mike

Hi Mike! Mine is simply on back order, awaiting stock. I've got too many other projects on so can wait ;) ................ ;( 

 

Martin

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14 minutes ago, RidgeRunner said:

I've got too many other projects

...don't we all.

 

Stuart

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Hi Ed, 

 

online reviews show that the rear fuselage is a little like a banana. Rob de Bie @Rob de Bie reports the need for two thin shimS to correct it.

 

Martin

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I built one years ago for SAMI. Still have it in my collection. Wearing bare metal and Italian markings.

Nice kit.

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2 hours ago, RidgeRunner said:

online reviews show that the rear fuselage is a little like a banana. Rob de Bie @Rob de Bie reports the need for two thin shimS to correct it.

Yep, the model has a serious shape problem in the rear fuselage. The tailpipe is angled downwards, instead of horizontal. This problem creates a strange 'sit' of the built model, and it needs to be corrected. I think it needs to be turned up some 2.5 to 3 degrees.

 

rf84-06.jpg

 

Here's the kit shape:

 

rf84-01.jpg

 

I changed the tailpipe angle by making two partial sawcuts from the lower side, leaving the parts attached at the top. The 0.1 mm sawcuts with a JLC razor saw were then filled by oversize 0.4 mm pieces of strip. This forced the tail pipe in an upward curve, enough to take out the droop.

 

rf84-02.jpg

 

So it's not difficult to solve this problem.

 

Rob

 

 

 

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Yes, Hannants says out of stock. I ordered direct from PJ Productions, it’s already on its way. 

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Posted (edited)

I'm tempted to replace the rear end with one cut from one of my spare Sword RF-84Fs. I would also try to use the Sword Canopy .... maybe. I might even use the Sword undercarriage legs.  I would feel bad using the Sword as a sacrificial lamb but it would be a relatively cost effective solution. 

 

Martin

Edited by RidgeRunner

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7 minutes ago, RidgeRunner said:

I'm tempted to replace the rear end with one cut from one of my spare Sword RF-84Fs.

Actually, your solution looks easier, Rob ;)

 

Martin

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Posted (edited)

Save your powder boys, the new one doesn't have that particular problem ...

 

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Can't say whether the profiles in Aerograph Minigraph #15 are correct or to scale or not, but they are at least straight  --  and so is the model!

 

Ed

 

Edit, just noticed that Rob's photos are apparently a different molding and that the new kit has been re-done completely, as far as the fuselage halves, at least.

Edited by TheRealMrEd

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13 hours ago, Rob de Bie said:

I changed the tailpipe angle by making two partial sawcuts from the lower side, leaving the parts attached at the top. The 0.1 mm sawcuts with a JLC razor saw were then filled by oversize 0.4 mm pieces of strip. This forced the tail pipe in an upward curve, enough to take out the droop.

...you would then need to alter the fin base to keep the correct angles of the tail section.

3 hours ago, TheRealMrEd said:

Save your powder boys, the new one doesn't have that particular problem ...

Phew, that was close. We are good to go.

 

Stuart

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Hi again!

 

The fact that I had never seen one of the original PJ F-84F's in person kept me from noticing that the kit had been re-tooled.  Anyone who has built the kit before is welcome to jump in and elaborate upon the changes.

 

For those among us who have never attempted a full resin kit, I will try to make very detailed explanations for all that I do  -- if I can remember!  For all you old timers, just pull over and take a nap!

 

I will explain how I build this model, and make no claim whatever that my way is either the best way or the only way to go.  In fact, I would encourage others to offer alternate solutions, for the edification of our brethren...

 

First off, wash the entire model in mild detergent, such as Dawn dish liquid, or in my case, a weak solution of Simple Green cleaner.  Scrub the parts gently with an old, soft toothbrush, and rinse completely, then let dry.  I use a large plastic jar filled with the soapy water, add the model parts, swish everything around, and then proceed as above.  Then I dump everything into a fine kitchen strainer over a sink to which a VERY fine little strainer has been placed over the drain.  This is to assure that no tiny parts get away.  This was particularly important on this model, as several tiny pieces had come free from their stubs, including some small PE parts.   Some people claim that this washing step is unnecessary, but let me say this  --  the first time that you personally find out that statement is not always true  -- you will become a believer, like me...    I have even recently been bitten by not washing a plastic model, although I have gotten away without doing so quite often.  Refer to Grandma's wisdom, shown later...

 

I think it is generally agreed that you will need certain basic tools and supplies to build a resin model.  Fortunately, this same investment is also generally useful for ALL your modeling, so that's a plus:

 

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First up are glue and saws, and maybe nippers of some sort.  Some folks claim to have great results assembling resin models with epoxy glue, and that will certainly hold things together, and give you plenty of time to line things up.  However, the only thing I am aware of that REMOVES most epoxies is acetone, which sadly, may also eat your model!

 

Therefore I personally use CA adhesives on resin models, both thin and medium consistency.  The thin where you have a perfect fit and want the parts to bond immediately, and the medium where the fit isn't as good, or where more time is needed for alignment.  The Debonder, shown above, is for removing the CA adhesive  should you make a mistake and need to re-open a seam; and it has the added nice feature that it won't eat your model!

 

Let me say here and now that not all resins are created equal.  Some are softer or harder; some are brittle or more flexible, and some respond better than other to some solvents.  What I use, is what I use on ALL the resin models I build, and it has worked fine for me over the years.  One last thing --  not all CA glues are equal.  You should experiment a little and find what works for you and what you can easily acquire.  Your mileage may vary.  I like the Zap products because I can pretty well predict their drying times; how well each holds, and so forth.  Plus I figured out how to get it off my fingers...

 

Saws are important also.  While I have sometimes used nippers on resin models, I have had many occasions where the resin part cracked from the stress.  I now use only saws to separate resin parts from their casting blocks, unless parts are cast too close together to fit the saw in, than I have a shot of me mither's milk -- Tullamore Dew  -- and give it a go!

 

The saw shown on the lower right, above, is the finest saw I know of, being basically a toothed razor blade!  But, it has a relatively short depth of cut, that is, from the edge of the blade to the holder.  The X-Acto saw blade on the left above, is not quite as fine.  Mine is so old it doesn't have a number stamped on it; possibly it was a #239, but I am not certain.  Anyway, it has about a one inch depth of cut for larger casting blocks.  Get the finest-toothed saws you can find!

 

Next up some other glues I use and another piece of equipment I recommend:

 

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I suspect that the two products on the lower left, the Dap and the Loctite are probably the same thing, ethyl CA, but I don't know for sure.  I like to use them when gluing wheel wells, tailpipes, cockpits and weights inside a resin model  (and sometimes to hang munitions from the wings).  The little tubes of CA on the right are when you just want a little drop and don't want to fuss with the larger bottles, which sometimes get glue blockages, etc.

 

The half-mask, shown at the top above is what I wear when I use CA, because my reckless abandon with using CA over the years building Balsa R/C models, has left me  now allergic to CA!.  The mask was bought from Amazon for around $16.00 US or less, a Honeywell 7700-30M.  The two screw on cartridges are extra, and while they make several kinds for sawdust, etc. , these particular ones are for airborne contaminants and are rated to stop almost anything short of the Bubonic Plague!  These are North p/n 75SCP100, and are described thusly:  "North® by Honeywell Cartridge helps to offer protection against organic vapors, chlorine, hydrogen chloride, sulfur dioxide, hydrogen sulfide, hydrogen fluoride, chlorine dioxide, ammonia, methyl amine and formaldehyde.; Made in: United States; Dimensions: 2.75 X 7 X 3.5; Manufacturer: Honeywell; Item Weight: 0.65"  --- cha cha cha!

 

For quick sessions with the CA, I have a small 6 inch desk fan that clips on to one edge of my modeling desk; I'll just turn that on, use the glue, and then move upstream of the fan for a few minutes -- usually to my computer.  I could also do all this in my paint booth which vents outside, but it's not as convenient for me.

 

For the longer sessions with CA, I slap on this mask and filters, then put my glasses back on, then glue away.  When done, I turn on the fan and vacate the room for a couple of hours.  Otherwise, my nose plugs up and my eyes water and I sneeze a lot -- took a lot of allergy medicines before I figured out it was the CA.  As my Sainted Grandmother used to say " Let A Word To The Wise Be Sufficient..."

 

Now, enough edumaction, and back to the building!

 

The above-mentioned saws are used to saw off the various casting blocks from the fuselage side and all the components that need to be messed with before joining the fuselage halves:

 

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Next, based on block number of the aircraft I'm going to build, the correct ejection seat was chosen, and assembled according to kit instructions:

 

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Next, all the selected parts were primed with Alclad II Grey Primer, and then painted with appropriate-color  enamels:

 

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Above, the primer-ed parts have been sprayed, with the intake and tail-pipe areas of the fuselage and the air intake splitter being aluminum, the tailpipe burnt metal, and the cockpit walls, floor, instrument panel, etc have been painted Cockpit grey, FS#36231, or as they say on the Brit side of the pond, Barley Gray.

 

Next, using one of the thicker glues shown above, in this case the Loctite, the tailpipe and the intake splitter have been installed in one fuse half, as well as a little lead weight, just in case:

 

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Modern alarmists  aside -- I have used lead in modeling for over 60 years, and during much of that time I also have fished, using lead sinkers of various sorts.  I am pleased to note that many of my mental faculties seem to still work properly, and so far, none of my children have grown three eyes or extra appendages, so there you go.  Your  mileage, again, may vary...

 

One last thing -- when adding the intake splitter, tailpipe (or any other parts, I guess) one should take care that both pieces will align correctly to the fuselage halves, that is centered upon the center line:

 

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otherwise, you're just gonna hate yourself in the morning!

 

Well, time for some detail painting before closing up the fuse halves, so back later.

 

Ed

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Posted (edited)

Thanks for the excellent intro to resin etc, Ed. This - one day - will be my first full resin kit. I'll sit back awhile with a mug of hot stuff in hand and watch :).....

 

Martin

 

PS: Oh, having an Icarus decal set in my file I know mine will be Greek, and I'm certain which one :). Mike @72modeler will have an idea ;)

Edited by RidgeRunner

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Martin,

 

I would have never guessed that you hadn't built a resin kit yet.  Time to get your feet wet!

 

Corsairfoxfouruncle, looks like that would be a good choice, as the kit has the short tail for the GK's...

 

Thanks reini, this one's for you!

 

Ed

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An excellent start Ed, very informative.

I'm currently building a full resin kit and one thing you haven't mentioned (unless I missed it) is the use of 'wet-n-dry' abrasive paper. Like you've mentioned, you have to be careful of dust and must of that will come from sanding, so when it comes to sanding, always use it with water, you produce a resin sludge and not dust :yes:.

 

Stuart

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Posted (edited)
6 hours ago, Courageous said:

An excellent start Ed, very informative.

I'm currently building a full resin kit and one thing you haven't mentioned (unless I missed it) is the use of 'wet-n-dry' abrasive paper. Like you've mentioned, you have to be careful of dust and must of that will come from sanding, so when it comes to sanding, always use it with water, you produce a resin sludge and not dust :yes:.

 

Stuart

 

Hi Stuart!

 

I'm with you on this. My only experiences of resin have been the odd aftermarket piece (cockpit or similar). Even with such small parts there is a lot of fine dust and, aside from the health aspect, there is a lot of regular work around my study with a duster and polish. I haven't ever ventured down the wet route but I should and I will :). When my head stops spinning with great kits coming on line, and the ideas for them filling my every waking hour, I will settle on what I will build after my Mustang and Sabre line. It seems like Christmas every day and I've acquired loads of kits across the past year that I dont yet have a plan for :(. I am, though, thinning out the pile in the loft, employing the global reach of the E auction site. :) I didnt realise that I had so much hidden away!

 

Martin

 

Edited by RidgeRunner

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45 minutes ago, RidgeRunner said:

thinning out the pile in the loft,

If only it was so simple Martin. I have very little that I don't want to build in my numerous stashes but I still add to them...mental.

 

Stuart

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