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Julien

F-104G Luftwaffe Starfighter (K48083) - 1:48 Kinetic Model

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F-104G Luftwaffe Starfighter (K48083)

1:48 Kinetic Model

 

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The F-104 starfighter was designed by the famous Kelly Johnson from Lockheed after a series of visits to USAF Bases in Korea where he sounded out pilots about what kind of aircraft they wanted. Their main focus was on a small simple aircraft with a high speed/altitude capability.  The new General Electric J79 engine was chosen to power the aircraft and he would wrap around this the lightest possible airframe he could. The new aircraft would be all metal with wings located further back than most designs to allow a minimum drag angle of attack. The aircraft would feature an internal 20mm Gatling gun with additional missile armament.  One downside to the new aircraft was the downward firing ejection seat which was developed after concerns of a normal seat clearing the tail. The seat would later be replaced by a conventional one, but only after a significant number of deaths during low altitude ejections.  Many operators would replace the Lockheed seats with Martin Baker ones.

 

The F-104G was developed by Lockheed at the time the USAF was not happy with the aircraft. The Luftwaffe at the time was looking for a new multirole aircraft and the Starfighter was reworked with a stronger fuselage and wing, larger fuel capacity, a larger vertical fin, new landing gear, and upgraded avionics. Many of these models would be built under license by Dornier, Fokker, Fiat, Canadair and SABCA. The aircraft had a poor safety record with the German forces leading it do be dubbed the "Widow maker", pilot workload was high and it emerged that original fatigue calculations had not taken into account the new role of the aircraft. It would later transpire that underhand methods secured many overseas orders with German and Dutch officials accused of accepting bribes. 

 

 

The Kit

This is a new tool from Kinetic. The Box top is branded as Kinetic Gold, with no explanation anywhere to what makes it a "Gold" kit.  The kit features an open electronics bay behind the cockpit, nose radar There are three sprues of grey plastic, a clear spure and a small PE fret. The plastic looks to be upto the recent high standards of Kinetic., the panel lines are very fine and I fear will disappear under primer and paint to a greater degree.  Construction begins with the cockpit, and the seat is the first thing to be built up. This is multipart affair and there is a C-2 seat and a Martin Baker one. The back and sides attach to the seatpan, the head part with the handles is attached and the seat gun fitted to the back. Seat rails are then fitted to the sides. PE belts are then fitted. The cockpit tub is built and the control column followed by the seat are installed. 

 

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Next up we have a few sub assemblies to make. The radar and electronics boxes for the nose are made up. Its worth noting there is no parts in the kit to fold the radome back to expose the radar? The rear jet pipe and the exhaust nozzle follow. For the undercarriage the front and rear bays are made up, and lastly the nose cone is put together. All of these can then be added into the main fuselage and it closed up. Some additional panels are then added to the underside.  The top to the T tail is then added as is the rudder. The three part intakes (each side) are built up and added to the fuselage. The nose wheel is now built up and added as well. Two different types of wheel are included, however there is no information as to which to use for any aircraft, so the modeller will need to check their references. The nose boy doors can then be added after the nose gear is in. The main gear is now built up as well, again two types of wheel are supplied, and again without any information. Once the gear is on the doors can be added. Moving to the rear of the fuselage the air brakes can be installed.

 

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We now move onto the stubby wings. There is a main centre section with separate leading edges and flaps. Holes must be made if using the underwing pylons. If not using the wing tip tanks then there are PE faces for the end of the wings. Once made up the wings can be attached. Back to the fuselage the cover for the electronics bay behind the cockpit is added. This can be open or closed. The glazing is now added. There are PE parts for inside the canopy. Small parts are then added to the airframe including PE AOA indicators. For stores, fuel tanks are provided for the wing tips, and underwing pylons. A double sidewinder adaptor is provided for under the main fuselage. 

 

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Markings

There are designed by Crossdelta and printed by cartograf. It is noticeable there are very few stencils on the sheet.

 

  1. 22+39 Fighter Bomber Wing 34 Memmingen 1984-87 With Earlier type Splinter scheme
  2. 21+64 Fighter Bomber Wing 34 Memmingen 1984-87 With Later type subdued scheme
  3. 26+60 German Naval Air Wing 2, Eggebek, 1985

 

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Conclusion

.This is a good new tool from Kinetic, Recommended.

 

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In association with

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Please note that the JaBo options would not use the AIM-9 catamaran. 

 

Cheers,

 

Andre

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Nice touch is the canopy tubings completely forgotten by Hasegawa, with open canopy is really important.

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Great review, thanks for taking the time to do it so comprehensively. i can't wait to see inside the boxes when my stock arrives next week :jump_fire:

 

Duncan B

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21 hours ago, Doom3r said:

Do you know how is it if you compare it to Hasegawa one?

Well unlike Hasegawa it appears to have correct sized wings , and doesn't seem to have rows of rivet holes on rear fuselage to represent the flush spot welds. Closer inspection will no doubt throw up other differences.

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