Jump to content
This site uses cookies! Learn More

This site uses cookies!

You can find a list of those cookies here: mysite.com/cookies

By continuing to use this site, you agree to allow us to store cookies on your computer. :)

Sign in to follow this  
593jones

1917 - New Spielberg film

Recommended Posts

A new film produced by Spielberg and directed by Sam Mendes.  I was quite optimistic when I first heard about it, but now not so sure.  Write up on IMDB.com: 

 

Two young British soldiers during the First World War, are given an impossible mission: deliver a message, deep in enemy territory, that will stop their own men, and Blake's own brother, from walking straight into a deadly trap.

 

This leaves me slightly confused.  They have to deliver a message 'deep in enemy territory.'  Who are they delivering it to and how did they get there?  This is the First World War, any troops deep in enemy territory would be mopped up in very short order, and how are the two soldiers supposed to get to them?  I note from the credits that the film was co-written by Sam Mendes with Krysty Wilson-Cairns.  I wonder what they used for inspiration?

 

Anyway, the trailer:

 

https://www.imdb.com/title/tt8579674/videoplayer/vi676641817?ref_=vp_pl_0

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm not over convinced,won't bother with the cinema but wait until there's reviews on IMDB then might get the dvd...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
22 hours ago, Vince1159 said:

I'm not over convinced,won't bother with the cinema but wait until there's reviews on IMDB then might get the dvd...

That sounds like a good plan.  When I first heard about the film I had hopes it might be ok, but from the write up and the trailer I'm no longer hopeful  :(  There's been some discussion about this on the Great War Forum and the general consensus is that a combination of Spielberg and Mendes is not good.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've just googled Mendes and tbh there isn't one in the list on IMDB that he's done that i've heard of!....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Vince1159 said:

I've just googled Mendes and tbh there isn't one in the list on IMDB that he's done that i've heard of!....

You missed out on the Skyfall and Spectre years, then? Movies don't get a LOT more high-profile than the latest Bond... 😜

best,

M.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
22 minutes ago, cmatthewbacon said:

Skyfall

 

 

Sorry my mistake have heard of one,never seen it but Adele did a great job of the theme song...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The trailer is rather confusing, I don't get how the plot as written works in a First World War setting - but I'm sure it will make sense when the film is watched.

 

I find it amusing that people are jumping all over "historical inaccuracies" already when we don't know any of the context yet.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There is apparently an article in The Times today regarding this film.  The article states that Sam Mendes grandfather was a Portuguese creole from Trinidad who volunteered to join the British army and served in the Ypres Salient.  He was awarded the Military Medal for his conduct at the Battle of Poelcappelle.  Possibly this is the background to the film, although I still don't see how it will work out as written.  If it is the Battle of Poelcappelle, it will have some personal interest for me, as my grandfather took part in that battle.  Will have to wait and see. 

 

18 hours ago, Tim R-T-C said:

I find it amusing that people are jumping all over "historical inaccuracies" already when we don't know any of the context yet.

A bit like the modelling fraternity trashing new kits before they've got their hand on them, isn't it   :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ive turned my back on any Spielberg film that deals with history. He tries but he never gets the details correct. I find its very annoying to me. Specifically red tails is the one I'm referring to. However he's goofed other films (indiana jones series for one) referencing nazi's. To me Spielberg's more interested in showing off his special effects and CGI prowess, than overall historical accuracy. It just ruins the stories for me. As such i haven't even watched a Spielberg film in a theater since 1989 i cant justify enriching a person who openly tramples on history. 

 

Dennis

 

ps- In some way shape or form i can hope this finds its way to him. He needs to know he's wee weed some people off out here. Sorry rant is over now. :angrysoapbox.sml::rant::boom:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
24 minutes ago, Corsairfoxfouruncle said:

Ive turned my back on any Spielberg film that deals with history. He tries but he never gets the details correct. I find its very annoying to me. Specifically red tails is the one I'm referring to. However he's goofed other films (indiana jones series for one) referencing nazi's. To me Spielberg's more interested in showing off his special effects and CGI prowess, than overall historical accuracy. It just ruins the stories for me.

Err... Spielberg had nothing to do with Red Tails; it’s a George Lucas film.

 

Spielberg did make Empire of the Sun, Saving Private Ryan, Schindler’s List, Lincoln, Munich and Bridge of Spies, all of which IMHO are good/great movies dealing with historical events delivered in powerful, dramatic and moving stories. If you haven’t seen them, you’ve missed out. He goes to great lengths to be as accurate as possible... within the constraints of practical filming. Empire of the Sun for example has a couple of flying sequences that were done with real planes, by Ray Hanna and the Old Flying Machine Company. It took a while and cost a lot, because Spielberg wanted accuracy AND the best shots for the film...

 

IMHO (but I’m not alone) Spielberg is the most _complete_ director working in movies, and has been for 30 years. He’s a master in every genre, and can direct everything from a powerful two-hander scene in a claustrophobic cell (Hanks and Rylance in Bridge of Spies) to a completely immersive large scale battle scene from a hand held point of view (first 20 minutes of SPR). 

 

...and what exactly is your beef with the Nazis in Indiana Jones? “I hate those guys...” obviously, but as cartoon baddies in pure entertainment romp deliberately done in the style of 30s adventure serials, what’s the problem?

 

best,

M.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
18 hours ago, cmatthewbacon said:

what exactly is your beef with the Nazis in Indiana Jones? “I hate those guys...” obviously, but as cartoon baddies in pure entertainment romp deliberately done in the style of 30s adventure serials, what’s the problem?

 

  Fair enough on the red tails, i had remembered wrong. I hate the nazi's as well but lets start with the afrika-korps not existing before march of 1941. Yet everything is stamped with the palm tree/swastika in both the original movie which takes place in 1936. The fact that Indy is holding an RPG  and aiming it at the ark. RPG's or panzerfausts didn't exist until 1943. And the last crusade with Sean Connery which takes place in 1938. I realize the movie is based on the 1930 serials. But you would think a man who supposedly has tried to be so accurate in his film making would get some of this stuff right ? The empire of the sun was in my mind the only film where the flying was good. I agree saving private ryan was good. 

      As someone who is Jewish i have never not once watched Schindlers list, to be honest because of the great dislike for Spielberg. Likewise I've not seen Lincoln or Munich for similar reasons. The bridge of spies i have seen. I thought it was just ok but not exactly my favorite film so I've only seen it once , and that was on dvd. In fact I have only seen a handful of his work since 1990. Those only on VHS or DVD with only one exception Saving private ryan. Now these are my opinions and i will keep them. Short answer is i cant stand the man and will keep my opinions. I realize that this may seem petty or even crazy, but these are my opinions. 

 

Dennis

 

ps - Sadly I'm someone that liked his work prior to that date(1990). I just cant get on with him or his work now and never will. 

Edited by Corsairfoxfouruncle

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 05/08/2019 at 19:31, 593jones said:

This leaves me slightly confused.  They have to deliver a message 'deep in enemy territory.'  Who are they delivering it to and how did they get there?  This is the First World War, any troops deep in enemy territory would be mopped up in very short order, and how are the two soldiers supposed to get to them?  I note from the credits that the film was co-written by Sam Mendes with Krysty Wilson-Cairns.  I wonder what they used for inspiration?

May I say somat.

A long time ago I was asked by a friend to research how his great-grandfather died in WW1.

In short; his unit was part of the 36th Division. They advanced on July 1st at the beginning of the battle known just as 'The Somme'. The man was only a private in a company. The company advanced and took positions over a period of 5 days. Then they got stopped and held their position. There were about 35 men plus officers spread between a small village, some trenches and some shell holes. They held this position for a further 10 days. What they did not know was that their section of the line had fallen back to the original starting trenches. The company was in fact about 1.5 miles behind the German lines. Messengers to the company had not succeeded in bringing orders for the company to fall back. In their rapid reposte the main German army had swept around this small pocket of British soldiers. The company had consolidated its position by occupying the village only.

On August 12th orders were received to fall back. There were only about 24 men, including 3 officers left. They fought a rear-guard action for 4 more days, during which my friend's great-grandfather was shot. Although he was wounded he went into the n-m-l to rescue at least two mates. Bringing in the last of those men they were hit by a grenade which killed them. Of the company, 2 officers and 12 men returned.

I found out that this was only one of several similar stories of events during the first 6 months of the Somme

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
17 hours ago, Black Knight said:

May I say somat.

A long time ago I was asked by a friend to research how his great-grandfather died in WW1.

In short; his unit was part of the 36th Division. They advanced on July 1st at the beginning of the battle known just as 'The Somme'. The man was only a private in a company. The company advanced and took positions over a period of 5 days. Then they got stopped and held their position. There were about 35 men plus officers spread between a small village, some trenches and some shell holes. They held this position for a further 10 days. What they did not know was that their section of the line had fallen back to the original starting trenches. The company was in fact about 1.5 miles behind the German lines. Messengers to the company had not succeeded in bringing orders for the company to fall back. In their rapid reposte the main German army had swept around this small pocket of British soldiers. The company had consolidated its position by occupying the village only.

On August 12th orders were received to fall back. There were only about 24 men, including 3 officers left. They fought a rear-guard action for 4 more days, during which my friend's great-grandfather was shot. Although he was wounded he went into the n-m-l to rescue at least two mates. Bringing in the last of those men they were hit by a grenade which killed them. Of the company, 2 officers and 12 men returned.

I found out that this was only one of several similar stories of events during the first 6 months of the Somme

That's an interesting post, Black Knight.  I know that, compared with other divisions, the 36th did spectacularly well, but I understood that, owing to the failure of the divisions on either side, the Ulsters were forced to withdraw to the British line.  The Royal Irish website gives this:

 

By 2200 hours on 1 July, after a day of slaughter and sacrifice, the remnant of the 36th (Ulster) Division was forced back to the extent that it had no troops in any of the German lines except the dead, wounded and captured. When it was relieved by the 49th Division the following day the 36th (Ulster) Division had over 5,000 casualties. The dead numbered 2,069. All three regiments were awarded the Battle Honour ALBERT 1916, for the opening phase of the Somme Offensive, oficially designated the Battle of Albert, for the fighting from 1-13 July 1916.

 

Link here: https://www.royal-irish.com/stories/the-36th-ulster-division-on-1-july-1916

 

What unit did your friend's great-grandfather serve in?  If it managed to hold out behind German lines until receiving orders to fall back on 12th August, that's a remarkable achievement, and I'm surprised I've not heard of it before.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, 593jones said:

What unit did your friend's great-grandfather serve in?  If it managed to hold out behind German lines until receiving orders to fall back on 12th August, that's a remarkable achievement, and I'm surprised I've not heard of it before.

I did the research back in about 1994. I can't remember his unit except what confounded it was 1. his regiment was actually in the 16th but some companies were joined to the 36th. 2. There was another man with exactly the same name in the 36th, in a similar scenario, and was killed in July '16. 3. There was another man with exactly the same name in the 16th who was killed in September '16. His unit was smaller but was trapped in captured trenches. His action took place in early September.

There were actually about 15 men with exactly the same name in the 36th, 10th & 16th. Of these, 4 men came from the same town, and 3 came from the same street in that town yet they were not directly related

I used the war logs of the officers of the various units for the research plus records in various regiment museums and archives plus some first-person papers of those involved. In doing one man I filled in the history of over 20 men killed in WW1 which relatives had no info on

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
23 hours ago, Black Knight said:

I did the research back in about 1994. I can't remember his unit except what confounded it was 1. his regiment was actually in the 16th but some companies were joined to the 36th. 2. There was another man with exactly the same name in the 36th, in a similar scenario, and was killed in July '16. 3. There was another man with exactly the same name in the 16th who was killed in September '16. His unit was smaller but was trapped in captured trenches. His action took place in early September.

There were actually about 15 men with exactly the same name in the 36th, 10th & 16th. Of these, 4 men came from the same town, and 3 came from the same street in that town yet they were not directly related

I used the war logs of the officers of the various units for the research plus records in various regiment museums and archives plus some first-person papers of those involved. In doing one man I filled in the history of over 20 men killed in WW1 which relatives had no info on

Researching soldiers' service can be very rewarding, and surprising, too.  It can also explode family stories; for example my grandfather served in the infantry and family stories had him taking part in the Battle of the Somme, the battalion he enlisted in certainly did.  However, when I found his service record I discovered that he did not, in fact, see action on the Somme, he was evacuated to the UK on 27th June 1916, this missing the opening of the Somme by one week.  He remained in the UK for the rest of 1916 in hospital and with a home service battalion before being posted back to France in January 1917, to a different battalion which took part in actions in the Third Battle of Ypres.  Quite a surprise.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...