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NickP

Spray booths

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I'm just about to move into my new man cave, I've got a nice area for spraying but I'm debating getting a spray booth.

I Never uses one when I used to spray on the dining room table.

 

Can anyone recommend where to get a reasonably price good spray booth please?

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3 hours ago, NickP said:

Can anyone recommend where to get a reasonably price good spray booth please?

It depends what you mean by 'reasonably priced'. £300, or somewhere nearer £100 perhaps?

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I have been looking at the foldable ones for about 60-80.

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34 minutes ago, NickP said:

I have been looking at the foldable ones for about 60-80.

£300 was well beyond what I was able/willing to pay and I recently bought this:

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Airbrush-Spray-Booth-Extractor-Exhaust-Kit-LED-Lights-Spray-Booths-UK-Stock/232570445341?ssPageName=STRK%3AMEBIDX%3AIT&_trksid=p2057872.m2749.l2649

 

I'm pleased with it and it certainly seems to do what it's intended to. It arrived quite quickly and was very easy to set up.

The only downside is that when the extraction pipe is fitted, it sticks out quite a way at the back

QqF_KI36wLRX7U3wXsIC14PByxrk9smrvPphyfs8

 

I ended up putting it in a corner.  

R5YwBGIpDqppjQpA8IvDygw51AP_XDL4r1zGXLQ1

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That's the kinda thing I'm after. I think I'll have to invest.

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Posted (edited)

Or you could make your own like I decided to do. Large enough for 1:18 car models, plenty of room inside it to move without touching the model against the walls.... The original design included a filter, but I gave up since the area behind the cabinet is directly outside. I might decide on replacing the back piece and installing two fans instead of one at some point, but right now it's more than enough even for lacquer paints.

 

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Edited by bmwh548

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This product has been discussed on this site before...……...if interested, by doing a search of previous interested members, heres one of the topics: 

 

 

 

4 hours ago, Gorby said:

£300 was well beyond what I was able/willing to pay and I recently bought this:

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Airbrush-Spray-Booth-Extractor-Exhaust-Kit-LED-Lights-Spray-Booths-UK-Stock/232570445341?ssPageName=STRK%3AMEBIDX%3AIT&_trksid=p2057872.m2749.l2649

 

I'm pleased with it and it certainly seems to do what it's intended to. It arrived quite quickly and was very easy to set up.

The only downside is that when the extraction pipe is fitted, it sticks out quite a way at the back

QqF_KI36wLRX7U3wXsIC14PByxrk9smrvPphyfs8

 

I ended up putting it in a corner.  

R5YwBGIpDqppjQpA8IvDygw51AP_XDL4r1zGXLQ1

 

 

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Well ive just got home from work and mentioned a booth to the other half. She said I'm not having one, I've spent 6 years happily spraying on the dining room table without one and splattering paint up the wall 😂🤣

I'll buy a new cutting mat and use my old one and maybe a box then lol

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On 23/07/2019 at 18:26, NickP said:

Well ive just got home from work and mentioned a booth to the other half. She said I'm not having one, I've spent 6 years happily spraying on the dining room table without one and splattering paint up the wall 😂🤣

I'll buy a new cutting mat and use my old one and maybe a box then lol

Really a shame that, because a spray booth is a very worthwhile purchase. It makes your whole working environment much more pleasant and allows the use of the more smelly paints without the smell. Convince your missus that it's a good bit of health and safety kit, she wouldn't want you to breathe in those nasty paint fumes, would she now? 😉

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Even if you stick to waterbased the booth would help because it pulls away all the overspray so less dust around the room. Maybe you can sell it that way :D

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I built my own too, based on a flat overhead oven hood that I inverted on the desk and then built a cowling round it, venting the air through hole in the wall with a flexible pipe.  There used to be a lot of talk about us blowing ourselves up because the motors weren't "shielded", but 10 years or more later and I'm still here (nevermind, eh?).  The way I look at it, if it's installed over a gas hob it has to be safe to extract unburned gas, so I'm happy with that :) £50 was the total cost back then, but that's probably risen a bit with inflation - the real inflation rate, not the made-up one that's posted. :yes:

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I justified the expense (more to myself than my other half) by having it for my birthday. Is having it a a prezzy a possibility for birthday or Christmas? Mrs. Gorby's happy because it reduces smells in the house.

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10 minutes ago, Gorby said:

Mrs. Gorby's happy because it reduces smells in the house.

I trust you're referring to paint odours...

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3 minutes ago, bhouse said:

I trust you're referring to paint odours...

Not necessarily. :wink: 

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On 7/23/2019 at 6:26 PM, NickP said:

Well ive just got home from work and mentioned a booth to the other half. She said I'm not having one, I've spent 6 years happily spraying on the dining room table without one and splattering paint up the wall 😂🤣

I'll buy a new cutting mat and use my old one and maybe a box then lol

Your house your rules your health, I know when spraying Lacquer paints I couldn't stand the smell without one.

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On 28/07/2019 at 16:20, Mike said:

I built my own too, based on a flat overhead oven hood that I inverted on the desk and then built a cowling round it, venting the air through hole in the wall with a flexible pipe.  There used to be a lot of talk about us blowing ourselves up because the motors weren't "shielded", but 10 years or more later and I'm still here (nevermind, eh?).  The way I look at it, if it's installed over a gas hob it has to be safe to extract unburned gas, so I'm happy with that :) £50 was the total cost back then, but that's probably risen a bit with inflation - the real inflation rate, not the made-up one that's posted. :yes:

Many years ago I built my own from a car radiator fan powered by a spare battery charger unit. To get the fan pulling instead of pushing I just reversed the connectors. It came with a fabulously shaped frame that vented a fair amount of air. It was also during the time of 'blowing yourself up' but I was then hoping it was fairly environmentally sealed. Multiple moves and a change of circumstances means it no longer exists but it certainly did what it said on the tin....

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On 7/28/2019 at 4:20 PM, Mike said:

I built my own too, based on a flat overhead oven hood that I inverted on the desk and then built a cowling round it, venting the air through hole in the wall with a flexible pipe.  There used to be a lot of talk about us blowing ourselves up because the motors weren't "shielded", but 10 years or more later and I'm still here (nevermind, eh?).  The way I look at it, if it's installed over a gas hob it has to be safe to extract unburned gas, so I'm happy with that :) £50 was the total cost back then, but that's probably risen a bit with inflation - the real inflation rate, not the made-up one that's posted. :yes:

Mike,  I understand your thinking, but unfortunately it's real life problems like insurance you  need to be aware of with these devices.  If you are putting anything flammable through the brush and the extractor isn't rated for flammable materials then, your household insurance company would not cover you for any damage if there was a  flashback fire.  I think you will find the instructions to all the cheap Chinese spray extractors usually have a section that says, don't put anything flammable through the device and leave on for 10 minutes after use.   Not too bad if it's your shed that gets damaged, but a bit different if it's your home.  

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1 minute ago, little-cars said:

Mike,  I understand your thinking, but unfortunately it's real life problems like insurance you  need to be aware of with these devices. 

After 10+ years of not exploding even when masses of vapour and aerosolised thinners have gone through the impeller, I'm going to take a guess that'll continue :) I also have no dog in this fight, as I don't sell spray booth extractors. :shrug:

1 minute ago, little-cars said:

and the extractor isn't rated for flammable materials

Gas is quite flammable, and it's already a vaporised. :jump_fire:

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I've also wondered about filters, as most people will duct it through a window or wall to the great outdoors.  Not very environmentally friendly, but no worse than someone spraying a rattle can outdoors - probably better as there are no propellants involved.

 

I suspect the filters are just another money-making thing to keep you spending even after you've handed over £300+ for a glorified cooker hood, clogging up with paint particles that could have been thrown outside and reducing your fan's efficiency until you have to buy a new filter.  Ka-CHING! :shrug:

 

The only time I can see a filter being a worthwhile investment is where you can't vent it outside, and you have one that extracts ALL the nasties from the fumes to the particles and leaves you with clean air.

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4 minutes ago, Mike said:

After 10+ years of not exploding even when masses of vapour and aerosolised thinners have gone through the impeller, I'm going to take a guess that'll continue :) I also have no dog in this fight, as I don't sell spray booth extractors. :shrug:

Gas is quite flammable, and it's already a vaporised. :jump_fire:

 

2 minutes ago, Mike said:

I've also wondered about filters, as most people will duct it through a window or wall to the great outdoors.  Not very environmentally friendly, but no worse than someone spraying a rattle can outdoors - probably better as there are no propellants involved.

 

I suspect the filters are just another money-making thing to keep you spending even after you've handed over £300+ for a glorified cooker hood, clogging up with paint particles that could have been thrown outside and reducing your fan's efficiency until you have to buy a new filter.  Ka-CHING! :shrug:

 

The only time I can see a filter being a worthwhile investment is where you can't vent it outside, and you have one that extracts ALL the nasties from the fumes to the particles and leaves you with clean air.

Yes, the filter stops the particulates getting into the atmosphere, that's what they are there for.  As to cost, a filter for the booth I have is £18 and for a  productive modeller lasts around a year.  I have a number of customers that I see once a year or two at shows who buy filters.  

  

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1 minute ago, little-cars said:

Yes, the filter stops the particulates getting into the atmosphere, that's what they are there for.  As to cost, a filter for the booth I have is £18 and for a  productive modeller lasts around a year.  I have a number of customers that I see once a year or two at shows who buy filters. 

Are the particles harmful to the environment in those small quantities, or just a tiny amount of dust?  I've cleaned my hose once in 10+ years and there was a tiny residue of dust in the bottom of the tube.  I had a spare section knocking about from an extractor fan, so I just replaced it rather than clean it out.  I suppose with a sealed extractor you'd be worried about clogging it up with dust, but my extractor hood can be dismantled quickly to clean all the dust out, so once every year or so I grab the little hoover and clean up.

 

It's entirely up to folks what they go for in the end, but as @Gorby said, not everyone can afford the expense and I don't really think that fear-mongering about a cooker hood is doing anyone any favours.  Buy a booth if you want, or make your own if you want. :shrug: Some of us are skint, some are tight, and some have loads of spare money, with everyone else in between.  Not everyone is a customer.

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3 minutes ago, Mike said:

Are the particles harmful to the environment in those small quantities, or just a tiny amount of dust?  I've cleaned my hose once in 10+ years and there was a tiny residue of dust in the bottom of the tube.  I had a spare section knocking about from an extractor fan, so I just replaced it rather than clean it out.  I suppose with a sealed extractor you'd be worried about clogging it up with dust, but my extractor hood can be dismantled quickly to clean all the dust out, so once every year or so I grab the little hoover and clean up.

 

It's entirely up to folks what they go for in the end, but as @Gorby said, not everyone can afford the expense and I don't really think that fear-mongering about a cooker hood is doing anyone any favours.  Buy a booth if you want, or make your own if you want. :shrug: Some of us are skint, some are tight, and some have loads of spare money, with everyone else in between.  Not everyone is a customer.

Mike, I'm tight with cash & you wouldn't believe my overdraft !  At the time I used the fit for purpose approach and decided on a booth.   All I would say is check the instructions of whatever you buy for any restrictions that could create a problem. 

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1 hour ago, Mike said:

The only time I can see a filter being a worthwhile investment is where you can't vent it outside, and you have one that extracts ALL the nasties from the fumes to the particles and leaves you with clean air.

When I rebuilt my room a couple of moths ago I ducted it to an airbrick with a vent that can be closed. I used something called 'Kair System 100 rectangular'. It doesn't get rid of the smell completely, but the ducting makes a big improvement, well worth the £37 it cost.

 

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I'm thinking of setting up a couple of computer fans to battery packs, with a ventilation pipe to point of out of the window to upgrade my booth. 

 

Before I go cutting holes in my booth, does anybody have any thoughts on how effective this might be, or have you tried it out already and can impart some words of wisdom.

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