Jump to content
This site uses cookies! Learn More

This site uses cookies!

You can find a list of those cookies here: mysite.com/cookies

By continuing to use this site, you agree to allow us to store cookies on your computer. :)

Recommended Posts

21 hours ago, foeth said:

file.php?id=118749&mode=view

 

Portable support rollers and 'pawls' added to the capstan, plus per request something added for scale. With this heat the glue barely works!

 

I'm sorry to inform you that that 1 litre can of Colourcoats is counterfeit.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

file.php?id=119584&mode=view

 

Cable is now done; I needed to lengthen the first (half) shackle a bit more from 37.5ft to about 44ft or the joining shackle would not match position with the photographs (and would be too close to the stopper and that would be very odd). Chain was cut, links added and here the final link is soldered in place.

Edited by foeth

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Chains is looking really smart.

Please tell me that you haven't made the chain, link-by-link?

 

Stuart

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have to admit I did.... 😱 Nice work during the vacation... running at a break-neck speed of eight links per hour...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Gidday Foeth, that chain makes the mind boggle! I counted about 4 1/2 hours of work displayed in that one photo. Truly incredible. Regards, Jeff.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

While making this chain some company started selling 3D printed chain that is just as fine, if not smaller...  😁 Not sure if I would have started if I knew that, but that's ok.

 

http://www.shipmodels.info/mws_forum/viewtopic.php?f=2&t=199784

 

One the hand it feels like 3d printing is the enemy of craftsmanship, but on the other these products are really nice! I'm going to use 3D printed figures; BlackCatModels is going to make new ones and their products look great. And I use a lot of DIY etch which is basically 2D printing so I should stop being grumpy about 3D...

 

There are two anchor chains and both are about twice as long as the one on the picture; this is half a shackle and you need a bit more to run to the locker. I am really glad that Hood's third anchor was landed though! The problem in the end was not so much the small link and the folding (though making the links from wire took time too), but my inconsistency with soldering. Sometimes all links would fail, one after the other, and then twenty in a single sitting would go really well. The problem is usually the tip of the iron not being clean and it just keep picking up dirt. And I also went to much higher temperatures as the hold & fold extracts a lot of heat. I used a special tip cleaning agent bit this was not enough to keep the tip clean. I stopped using the wetted sponge and went to abrasive brass shavings to clean the tip; in the last sitting that seemed to help. But I do use a lot of tips and they are fairly expensive. Anyway, I do not have my soldering under control yet.

 

This chain also includes all the joining shackles and swivel pieces that you can expect in the real thing. It was really fun to learn about cables and how these were operated aboard ships. The mooring procedure with catting, breaking and joining the cables sounds as a particularly challenging procedure.

 

The next step is preparing for the stoppers and cable holders. A bit more soldering and even smaller links, but these are not studded. I am a bit anxious about even smaller joining shackles though, these were a pain to get right.... there is so much happening on such a small stretch of ship!

Edited by foeth

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was about to make a frivolous comment about making sure that you have the correct thread on the bottle-screw slips... but frankly I wouldn’t put it past you to build one that worked!  You are an inspiration.

 

Most of us are striving hard for something that looks “about right”: you are adding cable links because you didn’t have an accurate half shackle.

 

Awesome.  The maritime equivalent of Peter @airscale

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am sorry Evert Jan, but I cannot find words to explain how much I admire your workmanship .... so I will just sit and watch in silence. Be assured that I am still here watching and admiring ....... in silence 🙂

Edited by maurice northcott
Last 2 words added

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, maurice northcott said:

I am sorry Evert Jan, but I cannot find words to explain how much I admire your workmanship .... so I will just sit and watch in silence. Be assured that I am still here watching and admiring ....... in silence 🙂

Likewise!!

 

Cheers

 

Nick

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

file.php?id=119724

 

Thanks guys; helps keeping the pace up 😄 Previous Anchor arrangement nearly fully removed, preparing to add wider planks for the capstan and cable holder arrangements (same style as the quarterdeck capstan, 0.75mm strip). These both lie fully in the horizontal, so a minor correction due to the bow's sheer was carved in the deck. Last year I bought a chisel set by Sujiborido (https://www.1999.co.jp/eng/search?typ1_c=101&cat=&state=&sold=0&sortid=0&searchkey=Sujiborido+chisel); very very(!) expensive (even before import tax!) but they are glorious to use. I bought them to carve in all the deck detail. So, all the plank ends are carved and you see some plank nibbing around the now-removed anchor chain locker, bollards or edge of the deck. The hatch is now open, as I thought it would be nice to have a ladder showing to the inside of the resin hull (it's still a WEM core inside!) but I want to build Hood at sea and it will be replaced by a closed hatch. The planks have already been added but the wife ordered me to help watch Formula 1 (which was "over" after 3 seconds for Team Verstappen...)

Edited by foeth

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

file.php?id=120027

 

A bit of work on the cable holder base; after one round of magic sculpt to correct... errors... Also added a 'something'  (red arrow) in the deck (1.2mm disc with 0.6mm Albion Alloy tube).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

file.php?id=120271


The cable holder dimensions were estimated from photographs. I set the number of spokes in the holder to six, fitting both the links and having a good distance between the two ends of the chain coming of the holder. The round parts were either lathed or made from disc. The spokes were added using a small template to get a consistent spacing.

 

Edited by foeth

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

file.php?id=120339&mode=view

Next in line for production is Blake's screw stopper, a small chain to tightly hold the anchors in place. In order to make sure that the anchor is really secured a rather large bottle screw is used. This part is about 0.7 by 3.5mm for the model and today I just felt like experimenting a bit. I do not have a milling machine but I hoped my drill press with a reamer would do the job; and it did! Took a bit of time to get the settings right (and I may have damaged the clamp a bit). To have the grooves on opposite sides I just turned the tube by (hopefully) about 180 degrees and start over if the part didn't work out. When the part did work out it was added to a 0.3mm drill with two 0.5mm tubes and soldered into place. The chamfered edges are just a bit of CA (Magic sculpt wouldn't adhere to such a small part).

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The wife claimed the hobby table this morning (during my week off!) so I did some updating of work done the beginning of this year from my bloglet.... copying the blog post whole:

 

new post

 

So last Christmas was going to be a week of modeling that should have ended with the forecastle deck painted, but I spent a bit too much time adding all the deck details, the aft breakwater and remodeling all the vents around B-barbette: they just didn't look quite right. This work was completed a few months ago (I'm currently finalizing the section in front of the breakwaters).

 

decks_48.jpg

Copying from an earlier post: the breakwaters were first drawn in Rhino in 3D; much easier to get part sizes rather than doing my own math.

decks_61.jpg

There are a few interesting details on the aft breakwater. A portable plate can be taken out of the breakwater and stored against the breakwater itself (A). Making a single piece breakwater is much easier, but I like this detail. Also, images of HMS Hood at sea show that these plates were not always fitted. A small cleat is visible at (B). Not so well visible is a small vent that starts in front of the breakwater, but ends up behind it (C); Ian Johnston's Clydebank's Battlecruisers shows this particular vent more clearly. And at (D) a small footplate for an awning stanchion is present.

decks_62.jpg

I made the small vent piping a bit over-scale so that I could add a nicely detailed mushroom vent. The barbette was fully stripped of detail, puttied and repopulated with vents. The location in the deck for the steam winches was nearly forgotten...

 

decks_63.jpg

The deck edge details are a combination of awning stanchion foot plates, gutters, tie-downs and railing stanchions; this required a lot of pre-drilling with a 0.25mm drill along the entire length of the hull. Working with small drills is possible if you have a steady hand, but when you drill through the flare of the hull you (or: I) typically loose a drill... if it breaks and you cannot reach it you have to carve it from the model. Fortunately I found a good address to buy large quantities of small drills at a good price, going to as small as 0.1mm (edit: they since moved the drills to a new website and increased prices... a lot). The cleats and awning foot plates (PE detail) are a plate with a rectangular hole (for aligning the parts automatically) plus a detail part with a small pin fitted into the deck. The small hole in the awning footplate didn't have enough margin in the design and the parts didn't fit, so, all the footplates needed to be drilled in and the parts soldered at the correct angle which was took time. In hindsight having the parts re-etched would have been a better decision. The cleat footplate had most of the top half etched away and didn't have this problem and was easier to make.

 

 

Edited by foeth
Annoyed

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have to admit that the real ship took less time to build... 🤫 I try to not think about that too much...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

file.php?id=120822&mode=view

 

Small plate with 6 eyelets made today and added the mooring swivel, the mess at the end of the red arrow. The swivel itself was hell (built in July) so I hope something is left after painting!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 10/11/2019 at 1:00 PM, foeth said:

I have to admit that the real ship took less time to build... 🤫 I try to not think about that too much...

Yeah, but they weren’t having to spend hundreds of hours poring over old photographs to work out what they were supposed to build!  I think you can be forgiven, somehow...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Every time I drop in on this thread, more marvellous details have been exquisitely created. No exception today. I have to keep reminding myself what scale this is.

 

Superb work.

 

Terry

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 10/11/2019 at 7:00 AM, foeth said:

I have to admit that the real ship took less time to build... 🤫 I try to not think about that too much...

True but then they also had hundreds of men building the 1:1 version. If it was just one man that built the Hood we’d probably still be waiting for her to be finished after 100 years. 
 

Dennis

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 11/10/2019 at 08:00, foeth said:

I have to admit that the real ship took less time to build... 🤫 I try to not think about that too much...

A few years back I built a WWII ship model.  The model build lasted longer that the actual war.  Good thing I wasn't building ships for the allied war effort. :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...